Tracy's Mobile Nursing Footcare

Tracy's Mobile Nursing Footcare Advanced nursing foot care Includes: * Diabetic foot care * Trim and file nails * Corn & Callus removal Relax in the comfort of your own home.

12/12/2017

Seventy-five percent of Americans experience foot problems in their lifetime, according to the Illinois Podiatric Medical Association. Many of these foot conditions, including corns, bunions, and hammertoes, usually have one thing in common, overlapping toes.

Painful at the very least, an overlapping toe extends over, or under in the case of an underlapping toe, an adjacent toe. This condition usually leads to foot pain, discomfort, and irritation.

What causes an overlapping toe and what can you do to prevent or fix the problem?

What are Overlapping Toes?

An overlapping toe condition occurs when one of your toes, usually the big toe or pinky toe, extends over the adjacent toe. A similar condition, called an underlapping toe, develops when your toe extends under the adjacent toe.

Overlapping Pinky Toe

Referring to the overlapping of your pinky, or fifth, toe. This is typically the most common scenario and is often a result of tight shoes smushing the outside toe against the others.

Overlapping Big Toe

Another super common condition that is also typically caused by tight shoes. Initially, friction from the shoe will cause a bunion to form, taking away space from the second toe and, in turn, causing the big toe to overlap.

Underlapping Toes

Similar to overlapping toes, this condition usually occurs with toes three, four, and five. These toes tend to move underneath the others. Sometimes thought to be caused by unbalanced muscle strength within the smaller muscles of your foot, but exact cause is still unknown.

What Causes Overlapping Toes

Determining the cause of an overlapping toe condition can help you determine the best way to correct the condition and prevent it once corrected. The cause of an overlapping toe usually boils down to one of three basic conditions:

Wearing shoes that are too tight.
A condition such as a hammertoe or bunion.
Your genetics.
Improperly fitting footwear

Improperly fitting footwear that is either too tight or doesn't provide enough flex can cause your toes to overlap. The restrictive nature of a too-tight shoe crams your toes together, giving them little room to flex as needed.

10/22/2017

A heel pain sufferer commonly feels pain either under the heel (plantar fasciitis) or just behind it (Achilles tendinitis). Plantar fasciitis (plantar fasciosis) - inflammation of the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is a strong bowstring-like ligament that runs from the calcaneum (heel bone) to the tip of the foot.

10/21/2017

Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition characterized by sharp, stabbing heel pain.

This pain often occurs when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time.

"The majority of heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis, or an inflammation of the tissue on the bottom of the foot," says Alan K. Mauser, DPM, a podiatrist in Louisville, Kentucky.

Located on the bottom of the foot, the plantar fascia is a dense band of tissue that covers the bones.

This band of tissue, says Dr. Mauser, acts like a bowstring on the bow.

"When you're off your foot it's not tight, but when you step down it becomes tight," he says.

"Over time a person can develop a strain or inflammation of the fascia into the heel bone, and it becomes a chronic and repetitive condition. One never really rests their foot enough to heal and get better."Plantar fasciitis is usually described as shooting pain in the heel. The condition can also cause some swelling in the heel.

While pain from plantar fasciitis can be extremely intense after rest, it usually eases during the day — although it may reappear after exercise or long periods on your feet.Causes and Risk Factors

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia becomes tight from too much pressure on the tissue, which leads to inflammation.

As tension in the plantar fascia increases, tiny tears form in the tissue. The more tension and tearing that occur in the plantar fascia, the more inflammation and irritation there will be.

This buildup of tension and tearing causes plantar fasciitis and results in heel pain.

Men between ages 40 and 70 are most likely to experience the condition.

There are a number of risk factors that can lead to plantar fasciitis, including:

Obesity or sudden weight gain: Excess weight can damage the plantar fascia, making it less able to absorb shock, which can lead to heel pain.
Too much pressure on the heels: People who walk frequently, run, or have to stand all day at work sometimes have this problem.
Foot abnormalities: These include low arches (flat feet), very high arches, or having an unusual step when you walk.
All of these factors can increase pressure and tension on the plantar fascia.

Diabetes and arthritis: Especially in the elderly, diabetes can inflame tendons, and some types of arthritis can do the same.
Wearing the wrong shoes: If shoes don't fit well, they won't support the foot. This can impair walking and add additional stress to the plantar fascia.
Plantar Fasciitis Symptoms and Diagnosis

Searing heel pain is the main symptom of plantar fasciitis and is an often unmistakable sign of the condition.

If your heel pain doesn't go away after a few weeks, it's a good idea to make an appointment with a podiatrist.

A podiatrist will talk to you about your pain and symptoms, and examine your foot to rule out other conditions that can cause heel pain.

Your podiatrist may order an X-ray or other tests to make sure there isn't a fracture in your foot, or something else that's causing your heel pain.

Heel spurs — small, pointed overgrowths on the heel bone — are sometimes detected on these X-rays.

But heel spurs aren't considered to be the cause of the pain in plantar fasciitis.

In fact, they're often seen on X-rays of people who don't have heel pain or plantar fasciitis, and are therefore believed to be an incidental finding.

Everyday Health » Plantar fasciitis » Plantar Fasciitis
What Is Plantar Fasciitis?
By Diana RodriguezMedically Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD
You may have plantar fasciitis if you get out of bed, put your heel down, and then want to scream in pain.
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition characterized by sharp, stabbing heel pain.

This pain often occurs when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time.

"The majority of heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis, or an inflammation of the tissue on the bottom of the foot," says Alan K. Mauser, DPM, a podiatrist in Louisville, Kentucky.

Located on the bottom of the foot, the plantar fascia is a dense band of tissue that covers the bones.

This band of tissue, says Dr. Mauser, acts like a bowstring on the bow.

"When you're off your foot it's not tight, but when you step down it becomes tight," he says.

"Over time a person can develop a strain or inflammation of the fascia into the heel bone, and it becomes a chronic and repetitive condition. One never really rests their foot enough to heal and get better."

Plantar fasciitis is usually described as shooting pain in the heel. The condition can also cause some swelling in the heel.

While pain from plantar fasciitis can be extremely intense after rest, it usually eases during the day — although it may reappear after exercise or long periods on your feet.

Causes and Risk Factors

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia becomes tight from too much pressure on the tissue, which leads to inflammation.

As tension in the plantar fascia increases, tiny tears form in the tissue. The more tension and tearing that occur in the plantar fascia, the more inflammation and irritation there will be.

This buildup of tension and tearing causes plantar fasciitis and results in heel pain.

Men between ages 40 and 70 are most likely to experience the condition.

There are a number of risk factors that can lead to plantar fasciitis, including:

Obesity or sudden weight gain: Excess weight can damage the plantar fascia, making it less able to absorb shock, which can lead to heel pain.
Too much pressure on the heels: People who walk frequently, run, or have to stand all day at work sometimes have this problem.
Foot abnormalities: These include low arches (flat feet), very high arches, or having an unusual step when you walk.
All of these factors can increase pressure and tension on the plantar fascia.

Diabetes and arthritis: Especially in the elderly, diabetes can inflame tendons, and some types of arthritis can do the same.
Wearing the wrong shoes: If shoes don't fit well, they won't support the foot. This can impair walking and add additional stress to the plantar fascia.
Plantar Fasciitis Symptoms and Diagnosis

Searing heel pain is the main symptom of plantar fasciitis and is an often unmistakable sign of the condition.

If your heel pain doesn't go away after a few weeks, it's a good idea to make an appointment with a podiatrist.

A podiatrist will talk to you about your pain and symptoms, and examine your foot to rule out other conditions that can cause heel pain.

Your podiatrist may order an X-ray or other tests to make sure there isn't a fracture in your foot, or something else that's causing your heel pain.

Heel spurs — small, pointed overgrowths on the heel bone — are sometimes detected on these X-rays.

But heel spurs aren't considered to be the cause of the pain in plantar fasciitis.

In fact, they're often seen on X-rays of people who don't have heel pain or plantar fasciitis, and are therefore believed to be an incidental finding.

Complications

Plantar fasciitis requires treatment to prevent it from becoming persistent or growing worse.

If untreated, plantar fasciitis can impair mobility and keep you from getting much-needed exercise.

It can also lead to back problems, knee and hip problems, and other foot conditions because of how it affects the way you walk.

Such a good article and worth the read.
10/15/2017
Death by Pedicure

Such a good article and worth the read.

Death by Pedicure In 2011, Dr. Robert T. Spaulding wrote a book titled, Death by Pedicure, the dirty secrets of nail salons. In his book,

09/17/2017

Footwear can sometimes be a culprit. Tight shoes can lead to the formation of bunions caused by friction, and these in turn can cause overlapping toes to develop over time. This is particularly true when the bunions form on the big toe, which leads to the second toe not having enough space.

09/06/2017

An ingrowing toenail is one that pierces the flesh of the toe. ... Whereas a nail that is curling (involuted or convoluted) into the flesh, but isn't actually piercing the skin, isn't an ingrowing toenail but can feel very painful and also appear red and inflamed as well.

08/30/2017

It causes peeling, redness, itching, burning, and sometimes blisters and sores. Athlete's foot is a very common infection. The fungus grows best in a warm, moist environment such as shoes, socks, swimming pools, locker rooms, and the floors of public showers.

08/21/2017

"Corns and calluses form on the feet and can make walking painful. Although corns and calluses are often talked about together, they are separate conditions. Corns generally occur on the tops and sides of the toes. A hard corn is a small patch of thickened, dead skin with a small plug of skin in the centre."

08/19/2017

People who have diabetes are more likely to have problems with poor blood flow (circulation) or loss of feeling (sensation) in their feet. Poor circulation to the foot may lead to sores that are slower to heal. Loss of feeling or sensation is caused by damage to the nerves in the lower legs and feet.
One reason why good foot care is so important. Call today and I would be happy to help. 😊

08/10/2017

Welcome everyone!

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Town Of New Alliston
Alliston, ON

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7054348588

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