Tooth Truth

Tooth Truth Tooth Truth was created during the COVID pandemic 2020. It has continued its presence to answer any tooth and dental questions you may have. There are also current articles posted as well as small contests!

EDAA Oral Health Initiatives
TOOTH TRUTH - FACE BOOK PAGE
The Edmonton Dental Assistants Association has a proud history of community service and oral health promotion. Since 1957, our dedicated and enthusiastic volunteers, RDA’s and RDH’s, give of their time and expertise in oral health education to ensure that the public is informed of many resources to assist them in maintaining optimal health

EDAA Oral Health Initiatives
TOOTH TRUTH - FACE BOOK PAGE
The Edmonton Dental Assistants Association has a proud history of community service and oral health promotion. Since 1957, our dedicated and enthusiastic volunteers, RDA’s and RDH’s, give of their time and expertise in oral health education to ensure that the public is informed of many resources to assist them in maintaining optimal health

Operating as usual

07/01/2021

To all of our Registered Dental Assistants and oral healthcare colleagues who have worked tirelessly throughout the pandemic on the front lines, we wish you a Happy Canada Day! Thank you for your service and for ensuring that Canadians continue to receive quality oral healthcare!

https://www.hu-friedy.com/blog/oral-health-challenges-facing-women?utm_source=pardot&utm_medium=emailTHE UNIQUE ORAL HEA...
06/29/2021
The Unique Oral Health Challenges Facing Women

https://www.hu-friedy.com/blog/oral-health-challenges-facing-women?utm_source=pardot&utm_medium=email

THE UNIQUE ORAL HEALTH CHALLENGES FACING WOMEN
Hu-Friedy
| 06-22-2021
The Unique Oral Health Challenges Facing Women
HOW HORMONAL CHANGES THROUGHOUT A WOMAN’S LIFE CAN INCREASE THE RISK OF GUM DISEASE AND TOOTH DECAY
Being a woman at any age means contending with certain unique health risks. As a dental health care professional, you can help your female patients manage these risks by refamiliarizing yourself with the direct connections between a woman’s oral health and her overall health.

The teeth and gums hold vital clues to body-wide conditions. And poor oral health can increase the risk of certain fatal diseases – some of which, such as heart disease, affect women disproportionately.

By learning to recognize the warning signs of systemic illness and by encouraging good oral health habits, you can help the women in your care enjoy longer, healthier lives.

In the following sections, we’ll explore some of the oral health issues your female patients may encounter at different stages of their lives – many of them driven by natural hormonal cycles – and how those issues connect to overall health.

Oral Health Considerations After Menstruation Begins
Changing hormone levels can cause a woman’s gums to swell and become irritated. This may happen during ovulation and a few days before a woman starts her period when progesterone levels are high.

Women are also more susceptible to getting canker sores (small ulcers within the mouth with a white or gray base and a red border) during their menstrual periods.

Hormonal contraception (including oral birth control, patches, vaginal rings, and hormonal intrauterine devices) can raise estrogen and progesterone levels, making gums sensitive, red, or swollen.

The higher hormone levels associated with birth control can also prevent blood clots from forming after teeth are removed. One study found that oral contraceptive use may increase the incidence of painful dry socket in women after impacted mandibular third-molar extraction.

Woman's oral health

It’s crucial for women to develop good oral health habits and get regular cleanings and dental checkups. As you know, gum disease often goes unnoticed until it reaches an advanced state, and it is associated with several potentially deadly health conditions:

People with periodontal disease are two to three times as likely to have a heart attack, stroke, or other dangerous cardiovascular events. Experts speculate that the relationship may have to do with periodontal disease increasing the body’s burden of inflammation. Heart disease is the number-one killer of women in America.
Gum disease may increase the risk of developing diabetes, possibly by making it more difficult for people to control their blood sugar levels. Gum disease is also a complication of diabetes; people with diabetes are more likely to develop severe periodontal disease. Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease in women by about four times and puts women at risk for blindness, kidney disease, and depression.
Bacteria that grow in the oral cavity can migrate to the lungs, triggering respiratory diseases such as pneumonia. People with gum disease are especially vulnerable to this phenomenon.
Oral Health Considerations During Pregnancy
To protect their own health and that of their babies, pregnant women should continue regular dentist visits and receive all necessary dental treatments. Women should let their dental care providers know that they are pregnant. Dental practices may choose not to x-ray pregnant women out of an abundance of caution, although the risks to the unborn baby are small.

The Unique Oral Health Challenges Facing Women

Many pregnant women may not realize that they can pass cavity-causing bacteria on to their babies during and after pregnancy. This can lead to early childhood cavities and extensive dental care at a young age. Children whose mothers have multiple untreated cavities or tooth loss are more than three times as likely to have cavities themselves.

In addition, a quarter of women of childbearing age have untreated cavities, and as much as three-quarters of pregnant women have gingivitis. If you have pregnant patients, it is vitally important to instruct them that more than their own health rides on their oral hygiene routine.

Oral Health Considerations During Menopause
During menopause, a woman’s estrogen levels drop significantly. This can have an impact on oral health and comfort.

For example, low levels of estrogen can decrease the amount of saliva women generate. A dry mouth (xerostomia) can cause a number of oral health issues, such as sore and sensitive gums, cavities, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay.

After menopause, women face a higher risk of osteoporosis, which causes bones to weaken and break easily. Women with osteoporosis are three times as likely to lose teeth as those without.

This article from Dimensions of Dental Hygiene offers some guidelines for treating patients with osteoporosis and periodontitis. They include:

Routine dental hygiene care and periodontal assessments.

More frequent radiographs.
Evaluation for temporomandibular disease.
Promotion of a well-balanced diet with plenty of calcium and vitamin D.
Counseling your patients to avoid tobacco, vaping, cannabis, and carbonated soft drinks.
Recommending the use of a power or soft-bristled toothbrush and flossing.
Oral Health Considerations for Transgender People
When considering the implications of oral health for women, it’s important to not limit these considerations to cisgender women only. Transgender people also may face unique oral health needs related to hormonal changes.

A 2019 CUNY study explained that changes in periodontal health may be associated with the variations in hormones that accompany either feminizing or masculinizing hormone therapy.

And even if hormone therapy isn’t in the picture, transgender people who were assigned female at birth may fly under the radar of dental professionals, particularly if they present as very masculine.

For this reason, it’s important to touch base with all patients, no matter what you assume their gender to be, and ask them if there are any existing hormonal issues that you should know about so as to provide more accurate care. Keep in mind that many trans people may be reluctant to come out to medical professionals due to fear of bias and discrimination, so clearly communicating that your practice is LGBTQ-friendly will go a long way toward encouraging that openness.

Your Role as a Dental Health Care Professional
Many women might not think much about how their biology impacts their oral health or that it would be any different for them than for men. It’s up to dental professionals to instruct their female patients on the need to take their oral health seriously. In most practices, dental hygienists are uniquely positioned for this educational role, as hygienists are the people patients spend the most time with, and they often establish trusting relationships with their patients.

How Hormonal Changes Throughout a Woman’s Life Can Increase the Risk of Gum Disease and Tooth Decay Being a woman at any age means contending with certain unique health risks. As a dental health care professional, you can help your female patients manage these risks by refamiliarizing yourself wit...

WATER, please consume for better oral health and of course, overall health. We sometimes forget to rehydrate when we are...
06/23/2021
7 Wonders of Water

WATER, please consume for better oral health and of course, overall health. We sometimes forget to rehydrate when we are busy or in the Summertime when we are having so much fun!!!
https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-water-health?ecd=wnl_spr_061921&ctr=wnl-spr-061921_supportBottom_title_3&mb=HYd9PHtEJhAJrhQgseCSALkPPfIfa0v42ekLyK2i5Yc%3d

Pure water can help you stay slim, boost your energy, and keep you healthy. See the 7 wonders of water in this slideshow from WebMD.

There are so many products on shelves and social media designed to separate you from your money. Teeth are not like fing...
06/09/2021
What to Know About Activated Charcoal Whitening

There are so many products on shelves and social media designed to separate you from your money. Teeth are not like finger nails. They do not regenerate. They are finite. Permanent teeth that you have right now are the only ones you have until death!
It may be best for me to stop posting what is no good, and get back to posting and educating you about "Your mouth, the gateway to your body".
I just hate how many people are getting scammed and scarred.
https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-to-know-about-activated-charcoal-whitening?ecd=wnl_orh_060721&ctr=wnl-orh-060721_support_title_1&mb=HYd9PHtEJhAJrhQgseCSALkPPfIfa0v42ekLyK2i5Yc%3D

Learn more about activated charcoal teeth whitening, including the potential benefits, risks, and alternatives.

contact@electricteeth.co.ukhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqcyRg1Nql0I still can’t recommend a mouthpiece toothbrush. (...
06/03/2021
Toothbrush Tech Roundup Q2 2021

[email protected]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqcyRg1Nql0
I still can’t recommend a mouthpiece toothbrush. (says Jon from Electric teeth)
This is a phrase I feel like I am repeating all too often. And I think that I am going to be saying it for quite some time to come.
But I am ok with this if it means protecting the oral health of others.
The most recent product I have tested is Unobrush. Having raised $2.6 million through crowdfunding, the end result is alarming. It is the worst product of this type I have ever tested — read my review here.
I am optimistic for the future, but it is going to take more time and more attempts to get it right.
Ideally, mouthpiece toothbrushes would be better than manual or electric, but at the very least they need to be comparable. Unfortunately, we are not there yet.
There are a few companies working on solutions, but these have all been delayed.
If you can do one thing today, please do let others know that for the foreseeable future the regular manual and electric toothbrush is here to stay.
I continue to see dishonest adverts promoting products like these that pose a serious long term risk to your teeth and gums. Too many are being fooled into believing these products are the answer they have been waiting for. They only realise they are not once it is too late.

Jon gives a roundup of the latest products coming to market in 2021 and the technology they offer.===📨Toothbrush Technology Email:https://www.electricteeth....

Probably floss and brush more often!
06/02/2021
Are your parents responsible for your cavities, or do you need to floss more?

Probably floss and brush more often!

To "cry poor mouth" is an expression used to habitually complain about a lack of money. A literal poor mouth, however, represents one of the most widespread global diseases: tooth decay. Cavities resulting from poor oral health can drive everything from emotional issues to low self-esteem and health...

Lot of articles on ECC again. Lock down probably brought out candy and sticky snacks?
05/27/2021
A gentler strategy for avoiding childhood dental decay

Lot of articles on ECC again. Lock down probably brought out candy and sticky snacks?

By targeting the bonds between bacteria and yeast that can form a sticky dental plaque, a new therapeutic strategy could help wash away the build-up while sparing oral tissues, according to a new study.

Early Childhood Dental Decay harms the primary and incoming adult teeth. Protect the child from pain and later problems ...
05/24/2021
A gentler strategy for avoiding childhood dental decay

Early Childhood Dental Decay harms the primary and incoming adult teeth. Protect the child from pain and later problems with dental care.

The combination of a carb-heavy diet and poor oral hygiene can leave children with early childhood caries (ECC), a severe form of dental decay that can have a lasting impact on their oral and overall health.

Why Your Dentist Might Seem Pushy
05/22/2021
Why Your Dentist Might Seem Pushy

Why Your Dentist Might Seem Pushy

Dentists know how to maximize the profits in your mouth. But sometimes it’s outright fraud — to the tune of billions every year.

Playing in the dirt is so cathartic!
05/14/2021

Playing in the dirt is so cathartic!

Playing in the dirt is so cathartic!

Margaret was pleased to receive her prize from all the entries in the April Oral Health Challenge!!She thanked the EDAA ...
05/13/2021

Margaret was pleased to receive her prize from all the entries in the April Oral Health Challenge!!
She thanked the EDAA for posting the notification on the dental hygiene page!

Margaret was pleased to receive her prize from all the entries in the April Oral Health Challenge!!
She thanked the EDAA for posting the notification on the dental hygiene page!

A great deal of research is pointing to oral disease exacerbating overall disease. We should start listening and taking ...
05/07/2021
Researchers Suggest Link Between Gum Disease and COVID Deaths - Oral Health Group

A great deal of research is pointing to oral disease exacerbating overall disease. We should start listening and taking note!

New research suggests that poor oral hygiene can lead to COVID-19 complications. McGill University researchers have found that people with periodontitis were 8.8 times more likely to die of COVID-19 than those without gum disease. Researchers say there are links…

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EDAA Oral Health Initiatives

The Edmonton Dental Assistants Association has a proud history of community service and oral health promotion. Since 1957, our dedicated and enthusiastic volunteers, RDA’s and RDH’s, give of their time and expertise in oral health education to ensure that the public is informed of many resources to assist them in maintaining optimal health of their teeth and gums. We look forward to continuing to serve our communities and contributing to the improved oral health of Albertan’s!

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Thank you Tooth Truth for the April fun. We appreciate the awesome prizes! Ps I flossed today.