Real Diabetes Support Group

Real Diabetes Support Group Real Simple - no shaming - people helping people lower their blood sugars, helpful suggestions and recipes. We are here to help and support each other - no shaming - no saying wrong wrong wrong - suggestions, helping each other through the good and bad - and recipes Every country has a different level of what is acceptable - I have posted the different sugar levels as a cover so everyone can see the different counts

12/20/2014

Query - when you have sugar lows - do you taste buds go weird on your for that day?

12/20/2014

Ok may have been ambitious to start this JUST before Christmas - will try and put up some recipes this week-end

12/16/2014

Should I start a folder for us to put in recipes that we may like to share?

12/16/2014

Tell us are you Type 1 or Type 2 ?

12/15/2014

Welcome all - I have posted the A1C chart as a cover - different counties have different rates of acceptability - it also shows the difference between the 2 different ways of reading (aka US vs the rest of the world)

in Canada the acceptable readings around between 5 an 7 - going below 4.5 is inadvisable (according to my diabetic doctor) others have been told it is okay

We are not here to say WHAT your level should be - BUT help you go get it into the manageable area - we don't believe in fad diets or how to lower it by being extreme - all suggestions and recipes (please include the nutrition values especially the carbs) would be great

LET'S HAVE A REAL CONVERSATION ABOUT DIABETES

12/15/2014

6 Diabetes Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

By Matt McMillen

WebMD Feature Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. Staying healthy also means making healthy habits in the little things you do every day, including what you eat and how active you are.

Start by avoiding these common mistakes.

1. Not Taking Control of Your Condition
Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day.

“You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University.

You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule.

You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes.

“Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other."

2. Expecting Too Much Too Soon
It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent.

“Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.”

To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit.

Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective.

3. Working Out Alone
“One error that people make when it comes to exercise is that they try to do it without help from other people,” Ahmann says.

Spouses, partners, friends, and family members make great exercise buddies. They also are terrific cheerleaders.

The same is true for your diet. It's easier to make changes when you have a friend or relative who's also on board.

4. Neglecting Other Problems
Constant stress and depression can really get to you. It's easy to feel too discouraged to deal with your diabetes. That can make matters worse.

“You need to recognize depression and work with it,” Srikanthan says.

Depression and stress can also have a bad effect on blood sugar levels. Constant stress may boost hormones that make it harder for insulin to do its job. Doing “anything to reduce stress will improve your blood sugar," Ahmann says.

Exercise helps relieve stress, and there’s evidence that meditation and massage will benefit blood sugar levels, he says.

5. Misunderstanding and Misusing Medications

Ahmann says many of his patients think medications are more powerful than diet and exercise. But in many cases, type 2 diabetes can be controlled by a combination of a healthy diet and regular exercise without the need for medication.

For many people, medication can be helpful.

Ahmann sees one mistake that stands out.

“It’s surprising how many people miss doses,” he says. That's a risky mistake, so tell your doctor. He might be able to change your dosing schedule to one that better suits you.

6. Poor Food Choices

When it comes to food and blood sugar, the big mistake is not the single candy bar that you couldn’t resist, Srikanthan says. It’s ongoing unhealthy eating habits -- what you eat over and over again -- that have a worse effect on your blood sugar.

“People think it’s a one-time diversion, but no, it’s a consistent problem that affects your test results,” she says.

The two biggest hurdles, she says, are calories and carbohydrates. You have to control both to keep your blood sugar level steady.

Keep a food diary to keep track of what you eat and drink, and always read nutrition labels so you know what’s in the food you choose.

Not eating on a regular schedule is another common food mistake. Make time for breakfast and eat regular meals during the day, so you don’t lose control and overeat in the evening.

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12/15/2014

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12/15/2014

Real Diabetes Support Group's cover photo

Real Diabetes Support Group
12/15/2014

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Comments

my blood sugar is 24.1 how do I lower it fast
I am so confused. I have been a diabetic for about 10 years now and I still don't get it. First you have to understand i am a blonde, and i've also had a few memory problems along with Neurolognical issues also, so things don't absorb as good as they should or used to. I've been to nutritionist several times.I also had one Endocrynologist tell me that i'm insulin resistant. Ok. Not sure what the difference is between good sugars and bad sugars. Are you supposed to eat when your not hungry just to get all your meals and snacks in a day?I guess for some reason i just don't get he whole concept of eating. HELP PLEASE.
I was diagnosed with diabetes last month. I've tried really hard to watch what I eat but I always feel like I'm hungry. What can I do to help with this?
Hi there, I am a postgraduate student at the University of Hull conducting my doctoral research into the emotional impact of Type 2 Diabetes. I feel this is a topic that is often overlooked and I am hoping that more research into this area will help to improve support for those living with the condition. I am trying to get as many people with Type 2 Diabetes involved as possible – and taking part only requires completing a simple online questionnaire. If you are interested, you can find more information or contact me via my website: https://compassionindiabetes.wordpress.com/ Or access the questionnaire directly via the link below: https://hull.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/exploring-shame-and-self-c… Thank you for allowing me to post on your page, and please feel free to share this post to help get people involved :)