Simply Nourish

Simply Nourish I help REAL families, with REAL feeding challenges She then travelled to Toronto where she worked as a NICU and Perinatal nurse. Specifically.
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Katy received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Kwantlen University in 2007 and began her career as a Labour Delivery/Postpartum Nurse at Royal Columbian hospital. Katy returned in 2012 where she joined a team of Public Health Nurses through Fraser Health. Katy's career has allowed her to gain valuable experience supporting
mothers to be able to breastfeed their little ones. Since the birth

of her daughter in 2013, she began to feel a urge to become more involved in lactation consultant work. In 2016, she gave birth to her son and obtained her International Board Certified Lactation Consultant certificate (IBCLC). Katy specialize in many breastfeeding issues such as difficulty latching, flat, sore/cracked ni***es, low milk supply, preterm infants, breastfeeding twins and transitioning from bottle to breast. Her mission as an IBCLC and nurse is to help families achieve their individual breastfeeding goals. This means providing evidence based information and resources while helping her clients create a care plan that feels right to them. She places emphasis on reducing stress, anxiety and improving maternal/infant health. Most importantly Katy hopes to increase a parent's self-confidence in their ability to trust their instincts and nourish their baby. Every parent needs a village supporting them and I would love it if you would let me be a part of yours.

Valentine’s Day get together.  Please RSVP!
01/12/2024

Valentine’s Day get together. Please RSVP!

You get to choose how you want to feed your baby.   With support and education.   Through discussion and exploration of ...
01/10/2024

You get to choose how you want to feed your baby. With support and education. Through discussion and exploration of options. Without judgment or criticisms. YOU decide. Then we get to watch you and your baby thrive! No one else gets a say. Not your doctor, midwife, friend, mother in law, partner, doula. Let us rally for you while you take control over what works for yourself and your family. What brings you happiness, peace, confidence? Do that and feel proud of that informed place you’re coming from.

I wanted to take a moment to celebrate this beautiful human.   I’ve been encouraging her for years to take the steps to ...
01/09/2024

I wanted to take a moment to celebrate this beautiful human. I’ve been encouraging her for years to take the steps to become an IBCLC. Why? Because she is one of the most genuine, kindest, smartest and most encouraging people I know. Here is a little snippet into Steph! Steph is a mother, birth and postpartum doula & pathway 3 IBCLC candidate. She brings her own personal experiences, as well as the wisdom she has gained by working with hundreds of families in their parenting journeys, to this work as an IBCLC. Steph has a passion for educating people about human milk, breast/chest feeding options, and helping families find what works for their unique, individual family. She believes that people know themselves best and that her role is to provide evidence based information while supporting families to trust their own intuition. Steph, I welcome you with wide open arms and cannot wait to see you gain skills and knowledge from the families we have the privilege to serve!

I’ve posted this message before but seriously no one needs another onesie! Please offer a new parent (or a seasoned one)...
01/08/2024

I’ve posted this message before but seriously no one needs another onesie! Please offer a new parent (or a seasoned one) a feeding assessment instead of buying more gear. We offer gift certificates for home and office visits after baby is born as well as prenatal breastfeeding 1:1 classes.

In lactation work, prioritizing the well-being of the breastfeeding parent and baby is crucial. An ego can hinder effect...
01/04/2024

In lactation work, prioritizing the well-being of the breastfeeding parent and baby is crucial. An ego can hinder effective communication and support, as it may lead to judgment or a lack of empathy. Being an effective IBCLC requires a compassionate and client-centered approach, putting the needs of the parents and baby first without personal biases. In collaborative postpartum team work, I have found that remaining a humble life long learner is key. Reminding myself to be reflective in my responses and ensuring I know how my words impacts families, is an ever evolving process. Thank you for providing feedback and encouragement while we problem solve and find solutions together. You make me better; personally and professionally.

We am forever grateful to do this work along side you all.   You’re so inspiring and courageous. Thank you for trusting ...
12/31/2023

We am forever grateful to do this work along side you all. You’re so inspiring and courageous. Thank you for trusting us to care for your families. It’s a privilege to support you while you reflect, evolve, grieve, celebrate and transition throughout your parenting journey. I’m right there with you. Feeling all the big feels as we wrap up 2023.

Pinterest worthy milk stash photos can be overwhelming and very misleading.  When you are planning to have others care f...
12/30/2023

Pinterest worthy milk stash photos can be overwhelming and very misleading.

When you are planning to have others care for your baby, a milk stash certainly can provide them with the necessary breast milk for bottle feedings. However, an average milk supply will be able to store an extra 2oz or less a day in the freezer for future use. So when you see an exclusively breastfeeding parent have a freezer full of frozen milk, remember she likely has oversupply which comes with many challenges as well!

If you’re returning to full-time work and your baby is going to need your milk, I recommend 24-32oz per day to meet their intake needs. On average baby will take 2-4oz every 2-4hrs.

When parents come to me for advice on how to build a milk stash, I always inquire about their WHY. It matters what they need extra milk for. I ask because building a stash involves pumping and most people cannot fathom doing anything extra after caring for a baby 24/7. No need to add to the already busy day!

Most people can build a small amount of extra frozen milk for future use by doing the following:

1) Add an extra pump session after your milk supply is established (usually around 4-6 weeks postpartum). Pumping after your morning feed can do the trick.

2) I recommend using milk storage bags, collecting in 2oz increments, to avoid defrosting excess milk that your baby may not take in one feeding.

3) Freeze the bags of milk while lying flat after getting rid of the extra air inside.

I hope this has helped you understand why it’s not necessary to have hundreds of ounces stored up. First, focus on reaching your feeding goals and then spend time building a stash if you want one.

- Wear black - it’ll hide leaking milk stains and baby puke/drool- Try to wear something that opens or lifts up easily t...
12/23/2023

- Wear black - it’ll hide leaking milk stains and baby puke/drool
- Try to wear something that opens or lifts up easily to allow for comfortable breastfeeding
- So you’re best to not “pass the baby”. When everyone bounces and soothes a little one back to sleep we often miss hunger cues and this may lead to a hungry kiddo and sore/swollen breasts(or worse mastitis). Don’t skip feeds!
- Baby wearing can be a lifesaver
- You don’t need to pump and dump if you choose to have a drink or two. Dr. Jack Newman says…”Reasonable alcohol intake should not be discouraged at all. As is the case with most drugs, very little alcohol comes out in the milk. The chest feeding parent can take some alcohol and continue breastfeeding as she normally does. Prohibiting alcohol is another way we make life unnecessarily restrictive for nursing mothers.”
- Babies are great excuses to head home early or take a break in another room. Deep breaths help a lot too!
- Remember you are the parents. No need to take unsolicited advice or defend your parenting choices.
- We know you are capable, but during the holidays — ask for help! Simple things like asking your partner to make a plate for you will take the pressure off
- Remember not all Christmas’s will feel magical. It’s completely normal if it’s just “okay”

The truth about thrush Ni**le Thrush is very over diagnosed!  Most cases of sore ni***es are caused by positioning, oral...
12/14/2023

The truth about thrush

Ni**le Thrush is very over diagnosed! Most cases of sore ni***es are caused by positioning, oral tension and tongue tie concerns.

Within the past year I attended a Douglas College Breastfeeding day. Dr.Katrina Mitchell explained that “websites and lactation lore report yeast as “burning, itching, and stinging” with “dry and flaky skin” or a “fine white rash.” This is a spot-on description of dermatitis or eczema”

She founded The Physicians Guide to Breastfeeding and as a breast surgeon, and an IBCLC who is active in the ABM as well as perinatal mental health certified, she is a wealth of experience and knowledge!

She explained that thrush is not contagious.  She explains that “va**nal yeast infections also are not contagious: sexual contact with a partner does not transmit them in the way sexually transmitted infections occur, and yeast from your va**na does not cause a yeast infection on or in your breast.  Diaper rash isn’t transmissible to your breast”

She goes on to explore that despite other protocols out there, she doesn’t see evidence supporting that both chest feeding parent and baby need to be treated if baby is + for thrush.  She recommends parents stop cleaning and sterilizing pump parts, infant toys, and other household items. She says that detergents may worsen allergy, which is often at the root of the chest feeding parents symptoms of burning and itching ni***es.

The take away? In the past year, I’ve been able to better assess ni**le soreness and I have not seen one case of thrush! I’ve appropriately supported clients in healing their dermatitis, vasospasms and milk blebs with better assessment skills.

Is your mind blown yet?

Everything I ever learned about candida has been challenged with evidence and so I thought I’d share with you!

“Tell your story. Shout it. Write it. Whisper it if you have to. But tell it. Some won't understand it. Some will outrig...
12/06/2023

“Tell your story. Shout it. Write it. Whisper it if you have to. But tell it. Some won't understand it. Some will outright reject it. But many will thank you for it. And then the most magical thing will happen. One by one, voices will start whispering, ‘Me, too.' And your tribe will gather. And you will never feel alone again.“ ― L.R. Knost

Got Milk!?Breast milk production begins with the stimulation of mammary glands in a person’s breast, typically triggered...
11/18/2023

Got Milk!?

Breast milk production begins with the stimulation of mammary glands in a person’s breast, typically triggered by hormonal changes during pregnancy. After childbirth, the hormone prolactin plays a key role in initiating milk production. When a baby latches onto the breast and begins to suck, it stimulates nerve endings, signaling the release of prolactin.

Prolactin prompts the alveoli, small milk-producing sacs within the mammary glands, to take nutrients from the bloodstream and convert them into milk. Meanwhile, another hormone called oxytocin is released, causing the muscles around the alveoli to contract and push the milk into milk ducts.
The process of milk ejection, also known as the let-down reflex, is crucial for milk release. Some people can feel they’re let down, others can’t. Both are normal!

Oxytocin is released in response to the baby's suckling or other stimuli, such as pumping or hand expressing, which causes the milk to flow through the ducts to the ni**le.

But be gentle expressing and massaging because some of these ducts are as delicate and as thin as a strand of hair!

The composition of breast milk changes over time to adapt to the baby's evolving nutritional needs. Initially, colostrum, a thick and yellowish fluid rich in antibodies, is produced in the first few days after birth. As the baby continues to breastfeed, mature milk replaces colostrum, providing a balance of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals essential for the baby's growth and development. Breastmilk is shown to continue to have amazing benefits for toddlers/children.

The continuous demand for milk by the baby helps maintain milk supply, and the process is finely tuned to respond to the specific requirements of both the mother and the infant.

Kinda amazing right!?

Happy Friday!

Ooph! The idea that parents may need a break from their baby is rooted in the understanding that caring for an infant ca...
11/06/2023

Ooph! The idea that parents may need a break from their baby is rooted in the understanding that caring for an infant can be physically and emotionally demanding. Parenting is a 24/7 responsibility, and it can be exhausting. People recognize that parents, like anyone else, need rest, self-care, and time to attend to their own needs and well-being. These breaks can help parents recharge, reduce stress, and maintain their physical and mental health.

A chestfeeding parent often doesn’t need a physical break from their baby but instead needs support with laundry, dishes, meal prep, house cleaning and running errands. Especially in the first few months staying close to baby often feels naturally necessary. The overwhelming part comes with the unsolicited advice, overbearing pressure to have an independent sleeper and to get back into our pre baby clothes. Have you checked out amazing doulas in your area to ensure you gain this type of help?!

Please be patient with yourself as you find your “new normal”. Lactation support often involves mental health support. I love that I get to act as your cheerleader, reminding you how truly awesome you are, along the way!

A fl**ge is the funnel part of a pump that makes contact with the breast. Having the proper fl**ge size can impact how y...
10/31/2023

A fl**ge is the funnel part of a pump that makes contact with the breast.

Having the proper fl**ge size can impact how your pumping sessions feel as well as have direct effect on your supply/pumping volumes .

Ensuring you have the correct fit is very important. 

In most cases, the fl**ges your pump came with kits is likely a size 24mm fl**ge. In all actuality, people usually need a smaller or bigger size.

To size yourself take a measuring tape to determine the diameter of your ni**le. NOT your ar**la. Measure your ni**le in millimeters at the widest part. Most pumping people find that adding 1-3mm to their ni**le size provides the most comfortable and effective fl**ge size.

A lactation consultant can be of great help if you're not sure what size fl**ge you need, or if you think you might need a different fl**ge. Book a consultant today if you need some extra insight!

www.simplynourish.ca
Online booking available!

A fl**ge is the funnel part of a pump that makes contact with the breast. Having the proper fl**ge size can impact how y...
10/31/2023

A fl**ge is the funnel part of a pump that makes contact with the breast.

Having the proper fl**ge size can impact how your pumping sessions feel as well as have direct effect on your supply/pumping volumes .

Ensuring you have the correct fit is very important. 

in most cases, the fl**ges tour pump came with kits is likely a size 24mm fl**ge. In all actuality, people usually need a smaller or bigger size.

To size yourself take a measuring tape to determine the diameter of your ni**le. NOT your ar**la. Measure your ni**le in millimeters at the widest part. Most pumping people find that adding 1-3mm to their ni**le size provides the most comfortable and effective fl**ge size.

A lactation consultant can be of great help if you're not sure what size fl**ge you need, or if you think you might need a different fl**ge. Book a consultant today if you need some extra insight!

www.simplynourish.ca
Online booking available!

Have you ever had a well-meaning family member, friend, or pediatrician tell you that you are letting your baby nurse to...
10/18/2023

Have you ever had a well-meaning family member, friend, or pediatrician tell you that you are letting your baby nurse too often? Did they tell you your baby was using you like a pacifier? Did they encourage you to spread out your feeds so that your breast had time to fill up before the next feed? While I never think that anyone intentionally is causing a chest feeding dyad to fail, these comments, can absolutely lead to pour outcomes of low weight gain and low supply. In order to make milk, we have to move milk. Think of the breast like an ice machine in your refrigerator. When the ice tray becomes empty, the fridge knows to make more ice. When the ice tray is full, this tells the refrigerator there is no need to make more ice. The same is true for your breast. When your breasts are emptied frequently, your body knows to produce more. When your breast remains full, or hasn’t been fully emptied, this tells your body to not produce more prolactin, which is a milk making hormone. Some people may find that they are at risk for low supply for other reasons, such as gestational diabetics, someone who may have experienced postpartum hemorrhage, or an unplanned caesarean section, someone who’s baby went to special care nursery, and there was a separation and delay in breast-feeding. Placing babies on a Feeding schedule often will lead to low supply because we are not reading our baby and instead we find ourselves reading a clock. If we have a baby who is having difficulty transferring milk at feedings, we may need the support of hand expression or an electric hospital grade double pump to stimulate milk production. When breastfeeding sessions are replaced by bottles of formula or frozen milk, there is a risk of milk supply decreasing unless steps are taken to protect it. Emptying the breast during this time is necessary! Any time you have or suspect low milk supply, I encourage you to seek qualified lactation support. Not everyone who claims to know about breastfeeding gives good, evidence-based advice.

No idea who created this so I can’t give credit to its artist.  But I love it.
09/29/2023

No idea who created this so I can’t give credit to its artist. But I love it.

Offering formula doesn't necessarily mean your breastfeeding journey is over. Many parents choose to supplement with for...
09/25/2023

Offering formula doesn't necessarily mean your breastfeeding journey is over. Many parents choose to supplement with formula while continuing to breastfeed. Breastfeeding and formula feeding can coexist, allowing you to tailor your approach to what works best for you and your baby's needs. It's a personal choice, and you can find a balance that suits your family.

Advice? if you are needing to offer additional milk or formula due to baby’s weight loss or other medical rationale-then you should pump x 10-20min after a breastfeeding session to ensure your body knows you need to offer extra milk to baby. If you give formula and skip a body feeding session but you want to maintain your milk supply, then you need to probably pump 20-30min each side. It’s all about supply and demand! If you are offering formula but are not concerned if your supply drops then just feed on demand and monitor for engorgement/treat accordingly.

If you have specific concerns or questions about breastfeeding, it's a good idea to consult with someone like me; a lactational consult who has experience in infant feeding support!

I’ve always loved babies 💜         To all of those mothering without their mothers.  I see you.  Holding space for you a...
09/17/2023

I’ve always loved babies 💜

To all of those mothering without their mothers. I see you. Holding space for you and the grief that can come when you lose that part of your village.

It's entirely possible to have mixed feelings about chest/breastfeeding. Many parents I’ve worked with have complex emot...
09/16/2023

It's entirely possible to have mixed feelings about chest/breastfeeding. Many parents I’ve worked with have complex emotions when it comes to this topic. Here are a few reasons why someone might feel this way: ❤️ You might feel motivated when you learn of the benefits of breast milk, however, you also could feel touched out and not wanting to be the only one who can settle them and offer nutrients.
❤️ You may want to bond through body feeding. Even if you don't particularly enjoy the physical act, you might value the emotional connection it provides. ❤️ Society often places high expectations on parents to chest feed, which can lead to feelings of guilt or obligation even if you don't personally enjoy it. ❤️ Some parents find breastfeeding physically uncomfortable or painful. If this is you please don’t “power through”. Get help from an IBCLC asap!
❤️ You might be trying to balance your own comfort and well-being with the well-being of your baby, which can be challenging. 🙌
It's important to remember that there's no one-size-fits-all approach to parenting, and what works best for you and your baby may not be the same as someone else's experience. If you have concerns or questions about breastfeeding, it's a good idea to consult with a lactation consultant who can provide guidance and support tailored to your specific situation. We are here for all of the feels!

Although recovery from a caesarean section commonly takes weeks, you definitely will feel better day today.  if you don’...
09/11/2023

Although recovery from a caesarean section commonly takes weeks, you definitely will feel better day today. if you don’t, you should speak to your healthcare provider. What we notice as a challenge for some parents who had a caesarean section is finding a comfortable position. Using pillows to help position baby and side lying in bed, can prove extremely beneficial as it will allow you to not have any extra pressure on your abdomen and it encourages rest. Take it slow and don’t push yourself too hard! Sometimes babies who are delivered via C-section will be separated from their birthing parent. This is when antenatally hand expressed colostrum and skin to skin with another person who cares for baby, can prove extremely beneficial. You can finger feed your baby any previously expressed colostrum while waiting to be reunited after you come back from the recovery room. You will probably find football hold to be the most comfortable The medications you are prescribed in the Hospital for pain will be compatible with breast-feeding. In fact, we encourage you to take medication for any pain you are having as pain can inhibit your letdown response, making milk transfer more difficult for baby. Extra support for the first few weeks after birth can not only be necessary, but can promote breast-feeding success. Feel free to reach out for a prenatal to ensure breast-feeding gets started off on the right foot and/or an initial consult after baby is born so you can reach your feeding goals.

Today is Tracy’s last day with us.  She’s taking on an incredible job in prenatal work and we couldn’t be more thrilled ...
09/05/2023

Today is Tracy’s last day with us. She’s taking on an incredible job in prenatal work and we couldn’t be more thrilled for her. Never goodbye, only see ya laters are allowed for this Bon Voyage! Thank you for everything you’ve done for Simply Nourish and the families you have helped! Clients: Leave a memory or shout out for her below!

Babies are very rarely allergic to their parent’s breast milk itself. However, they can be sensitive to certain foods or...
08/14/2023

Babies are very rarely allergic to their parent’s breast milk itself. However, they can be sensitive to certain foods or substances that the parent consumes, which can then pass into the breast milk and cause a reaction in the baby. Allergy symptoms in breastfed babies can vary but may include fussiness, eczema, rash, diarrhea, blood in their stool, vomiting, excessive gas, or congestion. If you notice any of these signs, consult an IBCLC and paediatrician to determine if there's an underlying concern such as oral restriction or if changes to your diet might be needed.

Feel free to reach out for support. This is inclusive to all feeding/infancy related inquiries!

Online booking available.

www.simplynourish.ca

Pregnant? Book a Prenatal Breast/Chest feeding 1:1 class with us in your home or our office/virtually.   We cover any qu...
08/12/2023

Pregnant? Book a Prenatal Breast/Chest feeding 1:1 class with us in your home or our office/virtually. We cover any questions or concerns you may have. We take the time to review
how to know if your baby is getting enough milk and signs of a correct latch. We discuss how to avoid painful latch and sore damaged ni***es. We teach you how to optimizing positioning and latch while ensuring you are getting the support you need with any challenges that may arise along the way. You may want us to size you for a pump and ensure you know how to pace bottle feed. These classes are whatever you need them to be. Planning to chest feed? We’ll support you. Planning to bottle feed? We’ll support you. Not sure how you want to feed your baby? Let’s explore the variety of options available to you and your family.

Tongue tie revisions are generally not considered emergencies in infants because they are not life-threatening condition...
08/02/2023

Tongue tie revisions are generally not considered emergencies in infants because they are not life-threatening conditions. While tongue tie can affect feeding and airway/oral development, it's often manageable with appropriate care and intervention. We say a collaborative approach is always necessary. Our chiropractors, cranial sacral therapists, RMTs, Naturopaths, Physicians, Midwives, Dentists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists are just a few of the people we refer to. This ensures your baby’s body and nervous system are cared for before and after the release. IBCLC involvement allows for you and your baby to be set up for success. Please don’t cut a tie without proper support behind you.

“My baby is always on my boob!!!!”Baby snacking" is a term used to describe a pattern of frequent, shorter feeding sessi...
07/20/2023

“My baby is always on my boob!!!!”

Baby snacking" is a term used to describe a pattern of frequent, shorter feeding sessions in chest feeding infants. It's a common behavior among breastfed babies and can be entirely normal. Here's some relevant information:

Frequent Feeding: body feeding infants often feed more frequently than formula-fed babies because breast milk is digested more rapidly. Babies may feed every 1.5 to 3 hours, or even more frequently during growth spurts or developmental leaps.

Shorter Feeding Sessions: Babies may have shorter feeding sessions, especially if they are in need of comfort nursing. These sessions can last just a few minutes but still offer essential nutrition and hydration.

Growth and Development: Babies go through growth spurts, developmental leaps, and times of increased emotional or physical needs. It’s not just physical pounds we will see. It’s brain activity too! During these times, they may nurse more frequently as a way to comfort themselves and meet their increased nutritional requirements.

Establishing Supply: Frequent nursing in the early weeks helps establish a parent’s milk supply and ensures that the baby gets enough milk to thrive.

Responsive Feeding: feeding is a responsive process, meaning that babies feed on demand. They know when they are hungry or need comfort, and parents can respond to those cues by nursing whenever the baby shows signs of hunger or distress.

Seek Support: If you have concerns about your baby's feeding patterns or growth, it's essential to consult a lactation consultant to ensure that your baby is getting enough nourishment.

Remember that every baby is unique, and feeding patterns can vary widely. As long as your baby is producing an adequate number of wet diapers, gaining weight appropriately, and showing signs of contentment between feeds, there is likely no cause for concern. However, we are always here if you have any worries about your baby's feeding or development.

Got white, sore and blanching ni***es? Vasospasm during breastfeeding is a condition where the blood vessels in the ni**...
07/08/2023

Got white, sore and blanching ni***es?

Vasospasm during breastfeeding is a condition where the blood vessels in the ni***es constrict, leading to pain and discomfort for the breastfeeding parent. It is also known as Raynaud's phenomenon of the ni**le or ni**le blanching.

During breastfeeding, if the blood vessels in the ni***es constrict, it can reduce blood flow to the area, causing pain, throbbing, and a bluish or white discoloration of the ni***es. The pain is often described as a burning or stinging sensation and can occur during or after breastfeeding.

Vasospasm can be triggered by various factors, including:

Cold temperatures: Exposure to cold air or exposure to temperature changes.

Poor latch: If the baby doesn't latch properly or there are issues with the baby's oral anatomy, it can lead to ni**le trauma and increase the risk of vasospasm.

Smoking and caffeine. Smoking can contribute to poor circulation, making a breastfeeding mother more susceptible to vasospasm. Caffeine is known to exacerbate symptoms in many

Underlying conditions: Certain conditions, such as Raynaud's syndrome can increase the risk of vasospasm during breastfeeding.

Managing vasospasm during feeding often involves addressing the underlying causes and implementing strategies to improve blood flow and reduce discomfort. Here are some steps that may help:

Warmth: Applying warmth immediately after a baby unlatches or you stop pumping can help improve blood circulation. This can be done by using warm compresses or taking warm showers. I often advise a heating pad or hand warmers

Correct positioning and latch: Ensuring a proper latch and positioning during breastfeeding can help prevent trauma to the ni***es and reduce the risk of vasospasm. Seeking assistance from a lactation consultant will prove helpful

Keep ni***es dry: Moisture can exacerbate vasospasm symptoms. After feeds make sure to gently pat the ni***es dry to prevent prolonged moisture exposure.

Medications: In persistent cases, a healthcare provider may prescribe medications to help improve blood flow and reduce pain associated with vasospasm. These may include calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine.

Breastfeeding in the summer can come with its own set of challenges and considerations due to the warmer weather. Here a...
07/01/2023

Breastfeeding in the summer can come with its own set of challenges and considerations due to the warmer weather. Here are some important points to keep in mind:

Hydration: It's crucial for breastfeeding mothers to stay well-hydrated, especially in hot weather. Remember that body feeding can increase your fluid needs, so make it a habit to keep a water bottle nearby.
Clothing: Choose lightweight, breathable clothing that allows easy access for breastfeeding. Opt for loose-fitting tops made from natural fabrics like cotton, which can help you and your baby stay comfortable in the heat.
Stay cool: Find ways to keep yourself and your baby cool during breastfeeding sessions. You can sit near a fan or air conditioner, use a small handheld fan, or place a cool damp cloth on your neck or forehead.
Sun protection: If you're spending time outdoors, protect your skin from the sun's harmful rays. Apply sunscreen to exposed areas and seek shade whenever possible
Baby's comfort: Help your baby stay cool and comfortable while breastfeeding. Dress them in light, breathable clothing and avoid covering them with heavy blankets or fabrics during feeds. Consider finding a shady spot or using a lightweight nursing cover to shield them from direct sunlight.
Sweat and moisture: Increased heat can lead to more sweating and moisture, which may increase the risk of skin irritation or fungal infections, such as thrush. Ensure both you and your baby are kept dry and clean. Change nursing pads frequently and consider using nursing-friendly pads made of breathable materials.
Increased feedings: Babies may nurse more frequently in hot weather due to increased thirst. Breast milk is not only a source of nutrition but also helps to keep babies hydrated. Pay attention to your baby's cues for feeding, and offer the breast more frequently if needed.
Be flexible with positioning: Experiment with different breastfeeding positions to find what works best for you and your baby in warmer weather.
Remember, children under 6 months of age do not need extra water to stay hydrated, just chest feed and offer a bit more sessions on those hot summer days!

It’s been awhile since I introduced myself.  I’m Katy, a registered nurse with 16 years of maternity and infant health e...
06/15/2023

It’s been awhile since I introduced myself. I’m Katy, a registered nurse with 16 years of maternity and infant health experience. I founded Simply Nourish in 2016 after becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. I have 2 crazy wonderful kids who challenge me, humble me and remind me to not take life so seriously. They are 10 and 6. When I’m not helping parents bring their babies into the world, I’m likely supporting you to feed them. The work I do never really feels like work and I’m so grateful to be a part of it all. When I’m not running my practice, I’m usually running after my kids! We enjoy ice cream dates, swimming and attempting to domino build together. My village is fierce and I’m always ensuring you have one around you. Reach out - this parenting gig is beautiful but nonetheless intense. I’m glad your here!

Every baby is unique, and there can be variations in p**p patterns. If you have any concerns about your baby's p**p, it ...
06/08/2023

Every baby is unique, and there can be variations in p**p patterns. If you have any concerns about your baby's p**p, it is always best to find a IBCLC and physician to rule out problems. Breastfed baby p**p: The stool of breastfed infants typically has a mustard-yellow color and a loose or watery consistency. It may resemble seedy or curdled mustard. Breast milk is easily digestible, so breastfed babies tend to have MORE frequent bowel movements.
Formula-fed baby p**p: Formula-fed babies may have p**p that is tan or yellowish-brown in color. The consistency can vary, but it is typically firmer than breastfed baby p**p. Formula takes longer to digest, so formula-fed babies may have FEWER bowel movements than breastfed babies. Abnormal p**p: Changes in color, consistency, or frequency of a baby's p**p can sometimes indicate a problem. For example, if the stool is white, black, bloody, or contains mucus, it is important to consult a healthcare professional. Similarly, if the baby experiences severe diarrhea or constipation, a health care visit is definitely warranted.

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