Raquel Fermin, Registered Massage Therapist

Raquel Fermin, Registered Massage Therapist Massage Therapist at Jane's Skin Care & Day Spa Medical & Health

Operating as usual

06/14/2021

Hello everyone! Thank you for following my page. I would like to announce that I will be taking maternity leave starting July 2021. I will keep in touch to let you know when I will be back! Thank you so much for the support 🤗

05/22/2021

Congratulations!

Massage Therapist Association of Saskatchewan has announced that The Massage Therapy Act is officially a Statute in Saskatchewan, marking a huge milestone for its members who put in endless hours since 1997, and for the profession!

View the MTAS' post: https://www.facebook.com/MTASaskatchewan

05/05/2021

🔈 TIGHT HIP FLEXORS CAN GIVE YOU A HEADACHE

ℹ️ Can tight hip flexor muscles cause a headache? Certainly, tight myofascial tissue in one region of the body can cause pain and/or dysfunction locally, but as most manual therapists know, it can also cause pain and dysfunction elsewhere in the body. There are many ways that a problem in one region of the body can affect another distant region of the body, including myofascial meridian lines of tension and myofascial trigger point referral. But another way is through mechanical kinematic chains of myofascial pulls that result in postural distortion compensation patterns. So, with this in mind, let’s examine the kinematic chain of elements that can lead from tight hip flexor musculature to headaches.

💡 A kinematic chain of elements simply refers to the links in a chain that are interconnected that involve movement. So, for example, the movement of the lower extremity involves the following kinematic “links”: foot, leg, thigh, and pelvis. Similarly, the movement links of the upper extremity are the: hand, forearm, arm, and shoulder girdle. And the kinematic links of the axial body are the: pelvis, lumbar spine, thoracic spine, cervical spine, and head. The concept is that motion and posture at one link of the chain affects motion and posture at the other links along the chain.

So, here is how it is happening:

➡️ Tight hip flexor musculature causes excessive anterior tilt of the pelvis,
➡️ which causes hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine,
➡️ which causes hyperkyphosis of the thoracic spine,
➡️ which causes hypolordosis of the lower to middle cervical spine with hyperlordosis (hyperextension) of the head at the atlanto-occipital joint,
➡️ which causes forward head carriage,
➡️ which causes tight posterior neck muscles,
➡️ which causes a headache.

✔️ CONCLUSION

When working as a manual therapist, it is necessary not only have excellent hands-on skills, but also understand how the human body functions mechanically and learn to recognize patterns of mechanics and pathomechanics that travel through the body.

Healthy Street
01/26/2021

Healthy Street

🔈 SERRATUS POSTERIOR INFERIOR - OVERLOOKED CAUSE OF LOWER BACK PAIN

You have a client who tells you this:

'I reached for something and suddenly I felt a sharp spasm in the lower part of my back, slightly to the side of the spine, at the bottom of the ribs, and when I breathe in really deep I can feel it'.

Based on the above description you should suspect that you might be dealing with the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle.

💡 Where is the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle?

The Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle connects the lower 4 ribs to four vertebrae (T11, T12, L1, L2) in the low back.

💡 What movements does the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle control?

✔️ Forced expiration (breathing out when breathing hard)
✔️ Assists with twisting at the waist
✔️ Assists with straightening the trunk (standing up straight)

💡 Activities that cause Serratus Posterior Inferior pain and symptoms:

✔️ Twisting the body when lifting
✔️ Overreaching overhead or to the side of the body
✔️ Lifting something heavy using the back muscles instead of leg muscles
✔️ Sleeping on a sagging or too soft mattress

ℹ️ Trigger Points

Trigger points in the Serratus Posterior Inferior may cause an uncommon local ache radiating over and around the muscle.

This may extend across the back and over the lower ribs, even continuing through the chest to the front of the body.

This discomfort is typically described by clients as a nagging ache.

In many cases this pain remains after other trigger points have been inactivated. This should be a good indicator for the therapist to recheck the Serratus Posterior Inferior for undiscovered trigger points.

👩‍🔬 Stretching for self-release of the Serratus Posterior Inferior

Cross your forearms just above the wrist, at about chest height. Inhale deeply as you slowly raise them up until the area where the arms cross is level with your forehead. Now lower the arms as you exhale.

Do this once or twice, allowing for a brief rest (a few breaths) before repeating. Do this exercise set several times a day.

Healthy Street
01/19/2021

Healthy Street

🔈 SHIN SPLINTS - MEDIAL TIBIAL STRESS SYNDROME

ℹ️ WHAT IS IT?
Clinically referred to as medial tibial stress syndrome, shin splints describe pain that develops at the front of the shin bone (tibia). It’s caused by excess stress and strain to the shins which may occur in multiple ways, including a bending stress on the tibia and excess strain on the musculature at the front of the legs.

ℹ️ CAUSES
While runners may be most familiar with this pain, other individuals may suffer from them as well. Repetitive activities, like running, are the most well known cause, but flat feet, tight calves, inappropriate training or poor shoes may also contribute to shin splints.

ℹ️ SYMPTOMS
Symptoms may include pain and swelling along the front and/or the inside aspect of the lower leg. Shin splints may go away for some runners after they become accustomed to the activity, but for others, the pain can persist. It is important to get treatment as the condition can progress to stress fractures of the tibia.

💡 SELF-CARE FOR SHIN SPLINTS
Self-care for shin splints begins with RICE: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If the client/patient has anterior shin splints that is caused by running or some other physical activity that involves running, the client/patient should stop the activity until the condition is resolved. If the condition is not severe, then the client/patient might be able to continue participating in the sport if either the distance that is being run is decreased or the client switches to running on a softer surface. However, it is also likely that continuing to run will delay healing and prolong the condition. If the client has posterior shin splints that is caused by an activity that involves plantarflexion, the client should stop or lessen this activity.

Once the acute phase of shin splints is over, strengthening the involved musculature can be helpful. Individual muscle groups can be easily exercised at home with resistance tubing. Plantarflexion musculature (e.g., the soleus) can be easily exercised with heel raises. The client/patient simply stands and then rises up on their heels (engaging the muscles of plantarflexion concentrically) and then slowly lowers their body back down (engaging the muscles of plantarflexion eccentrically). The client/patient should do one set of heel raises until the musculature reaches exhaustion, working up to the goal of performing a set of 100. One to three sets should be done per day.

ℹ️ HOW MASSAGE CAN HELP IN SHIN SPLINTS?
Massage can improve shin splints as it relaxes the tension on the calf muscles and other nearby attachments. The massage should be done in both front and back portion of the leg for better results. It reduces pain and swelling.

Healthy Street
01/13/2021

Healthy Street

🔈 ACTIVATE YOUR VAGUS NERVE

The Vagus Nerve is the brain’s method of controlling the parasympathetic nervous system – the rest and digest system. It is not the only nerve controlling our ability to decrease stressors, but it is by far the single most important nerve due to its far reaching effects. The word “vagus” means wanderer, as this nerve wanders throughout the body to many important organs and imparts signals from the brain regarding their level of function.

This nerve connects the brain to the gut (intestines and stomach), heart, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, kidney, ureter, spleen, lungs, sex organs (in females), neck (pharynx, larynx and esophagus), ears and the tongue. No other nerve in the body has such a broad and far reaching effect as the Vagus Nerve.

FUNCTIONS:
• In the brain, the vagus helps control anxiety and depression.
• In the gut, it increases stomach acidity, digestive juices, and gut flow.
• In the heart, it controls heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure. Vagus activation will lower the risk for heart disease and stroke.
• In the liver and pancreas, it helps controls glucose store and balance.
• In the gallbladder, it helps release bile, which can help you get rid of toxins and break down fat.

Vagus nerve stimulation has the potential to help those suffering from various health conditions, including but certainly not limited to anxiety disorders, heart disease, some forms of cancer, poor circulation, leaky gut syndrome, alzheimer’s, memory and mood disorders, migraine’s and headaches, fibromyalgia, obesity, tinnitus, addiction, autism and autoimmune conditions.

So how can we stimulate this nerve to ensure that this nerve is functioning optimally? Here are a few ways you can exercise and stimulate your vagus nerve:

COLD SHOWERS
Any acute cold exposure will increase vagus nerve stimulation. Studies have shown that when your body adjusts to cold, your fight or flight (sympathetic) system declines and your rest and digest (parasympathetic) system increases, which is mediated by the vagus nerve.

MASSAGE
You can manually stimulate your vagus nerve by massaging several areas. A foot massage can stimulate vagus nerve activity, as can massaging your neck. A neck massage along the carotid sinus (the right side of your throat near where you check your pulse) can also stimulate the vagus nerve.

YOGA
Yoga increases vagus nerve activity and your parasympathetic system in general.
A 12-week yoga intervention was associated with greater improvements in mood and anxiety than a control group who just did walking exercises. The study found increased thalamic GABA levels, which were associated with improved mood and decreased anxiety.

BREATHING TECHNIQUES
Deep breathing is always relaxing to your body, but you can use other breathing techniques to stimulate your vagus nerve. Alternate nostril breathing or yogic breathing is a great way to stimulate the vagus nerve. Another breathing technique that you may never have tried is inhaling deeply and then closing your airway while pushing your breath against the inside of your chest and bearing down with your abdominal muscles (like you are trying to pass gas). This method of applying internal pressure from the lungs out to the surrounding organs stimulates the vagus nerve as it connects your heart, spleen, lungs, stomach, and small intestines.

Healthy Street
11/30/2020

Healthy Street

🔈 SERRATUS POSTERIOR INFERIOR - OVERLOOKED CAUSE OF LOWER BACK PAIN

You have a client who tells you this:

'I reached for something and suddenly I felt a sharp spasm in the lower part of my back, slightly to the side of the spine, at the bottom of the ribs, and when I breathe in really deep I can feel it'.

Based on the above description you should suspect that you might be dealing with the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle.

💡 Where is the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle?

The Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle connects the lower 4 ribs to four vertebrae (T11, T12, L1, L2) in the low back.

💡 What movements does the Serratus Posterior Inferior muscle control?

✔️ Forced expiration (breathing out when breathing hard)
✔️ Assists with twisting at the waist
✔️ Assists with straightening the trunk (standing up straight)

💡 Activities that cause Serratus Posterior Inferior pain and symptoms:

✔️ Twisting the body when lifting
✔️ Overreaching overhead or to the side of the body
✔️ Lifting something heavy using the back muscles instead of leg muscles
✔️ Sleeping on a sagging or too soft mattress

ℹ️ Trigger Points

Trigger points in the Serratus Posterior Inferior may cause an uncommon local ache radiating over and around the muscle.

This may extend across the back and over the lower ribs, even continuing through the chest to the front of the body.

This discomfort is typically described by clients as a nagging ache.

In many cases this pain remains after other trigger points have been inactivated. This should be a good indicator for the therapist to recheck the Serratus Posterior Inferior for undiscovered trigger points.

👩‍🔬 Stretching for self-release of the Serratus Posterior Inferior

Cross your forearms just above the wrist, at about chest height. Inhale deeply as you slowly raise them up until the area where the arms cross is level with your forehead. Now lower the arms as you exhale.

Do this once or twice, allowing for a brief rest (a few breaths) before repeating. Do this exercise set several times a day.

Healthy Street
10/09/2020

Healthy Street

🔈 MASSAGE THERAPY FOR EDEMA

Edema is a condition where there is accumulation of fluid in the tissues resulting in swelling. Edema usually affects the dependent parts of the body such as extremities. The causes of edema are various medical conditions and massage therapy may not benefit in systemic causes of edema. However, massage therapy can be beneficial in local causes of edema. Massage should always be started after the patient has consulted with his/her health care provider. Patient should always get massage done by an experienced and qualified massage therapist, because if massage is done by an amateur or if done incorrectly, it can cause more harm than good.

Lymphatic Massage involves a light touch massage therapy which helps in enhancing the functioning of the lymphatic system. It is also known as Lymphatic Drainage Massage or Manual Lymphatic Massage. If there is a problem in the functioning of the lymphatic system, then it leads to swelling, headaches, cramps, fluid retention, fatigue, lethargy, joint pain, and repeated cold and flu infections.

The lymphatic massage technique involves stimulating the lymphatic drainage system. This helps in encouraging the drainage of accumulated fluids and helps in restoring the normal function of the lymphatic drainage system. Lymphatic massage technique involves gentle touch with the massage strokes directed towards the heart (direction of the lymphatic flow). Preferably one finger should be used to perform these massage strokes. The massage strokes should be short and in one direction beginning with the affected limb lying closest to the trunk.

BENEFITS OF LYMPHATIC MASSAGE

* Lymphatic massage therapy should be done by trained and professional massage therapists only.
* Only light pressure with circular rhythmic movements should be used in order to stimulate the lymphatic system in improving its function.
* Lymphatic massage, when done properly, helps in removing the blockages present in the lymphatic system.
* Lymphatic massage helps in increasing the lymph flow in the body which in turn helps in removal of waste and toxins from the body and enhances metabolism and makes the immune system stronger.
* Patient feels very rejuvenated, energetic and relaxed after a lymphatic massage. Patient may also feel thirsty and must drink lots of water.

Healthy Street
10/02/2020

Healthy Street

🔈 SHOULDER HYPERMOBILITY - ANATOMY, CAUSES, EXERCISE

Joint mobility and muscle, tendon and ligament flexibility occur along a spectrum with everyone displaying individual levels of mobility/flexibility; hypermobility is an extreme form of connective tissue laxity which can cause structural dysfunction, pain and a multitude of long term problems. You can’t change your natural predisposition toward hypermobility but you can change how you control it.

Women have a higher pre-disposition towards symptoms of hypermobility, due to their individual levels of oestrogen, progesterone and relaxin produced within their bodies during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Men, due to their hormonal make up, display lower levels of individuals with hyper-mobility.

Hypermobile people feel tight; it’s most likely that muscles are fighting to hold joints together because tendons are lacking tension. At best, stretching is only going to feed into the dysfunction. Some individuals have more congenital laxity than others. This essentially means their tendons and ligaments have a bit more give to them. As a result, they can have substantially more flexibility because of the lack of passive stiffness. This means the muscles have to work harder to create stability at the hypermobile joints. This can often be accompanied by feelings of pain in end ranges of movement and general fatigue.

KNOW THE SHOULDER

To understand how your shoulders can lose stability, it helps to first understand their basic structure and proper functioning. There are five parts of the shoulder joint:

1. The scapula (or shoulder blade): The scapulae are flat bones in the upper ack that connect the arms to the trunk and serve as “the foundation for the shoulder joint. The scapula transfers force from the shoulder joint to the trunk.

2. The glenohumeral joint: This “ball and socket” joint is where the head of
he humerus (upper arm bone) meets the shoulder blade. It allows for tremendous range of motion but tends to be unstable because the contact area between the humerus and the shoulder socket is very small.

3. The rotator cuff: The muscles and tendons that make up the rotator cuff compensate for the glenohumeral joint’s lack of stability by pressing the humeral head into the joint during heavy lifting and high-speed activities. It’s like a set of magnets that suck the humerus into the shoulder socket for added stability.

4. The shoulder capsule: This ligament tissue encapsulates the head of the humerus and attaches to the shoulder socket through a layer of cartilage called the labrum. The shoulder capsule is the primary source of structural stability in the glenohumeral joint.

5. The scapular muscles: The muscles that connect the shoulder blades to the rib cage, spine, collarbones and upper arms enable the shoulder blades to move in various directions. They also stabilize the shoulder during movements such as throwing.

Ideally, each part of your shoulder would do its job exactly as described, but the relationship between mobility and stability can go bad when one or more elements of the shoulder structure loses its ability to function optimally.

ACTIVATION / STABILISATION

Activation and stabilization become increasingly important for the individual with instability or hypermobility. However, the approach to stabilization is similar to any client working on a corrective shoulder program. Shoulder stability begins with scapular stability. If the client demonstrated more downward rotation of the scapulae, instead of the scapula truly sliding down the ribcage, emphasis should be placed on teaching proper depression. Further, optimal retraction and protraction must be taught.

✅ Single Arm Depression (monitor the position of the shoulder blade to prevent downward rotation): 12 reps with 5-second isometric hold, repeat on other side

✅ Modified Plank—Depression Protraction: 12 reps with 5-second isometric hold

The rotator cuff is also important as these muscles provide additional stabilization to make up for the lack of joint integrity. Two methods for taking advantage of rotator cuff activation in the client with joint hypermobility are compression and distraction.

✅ Supine Distraction/Shoulder Packing: Stabilise shoulder as partner pulls up. The shoulder should remain retracted and properly depressed: 12 reps with 2-second isometric hold, repeat on the other side

✅ Static Push-up with Arm Lifts: Lift the arm as high as possible while maintaining shoulder stability. Alternate sides for a total of 16-20 reps

An often-overlooked technique which cannot be forgotten in the hypermobile client is perturbation training. Perturbation is when something stable is pushed out of balance and then must return to its stable state. There are many different highly-effective methods of perturbation training, such as the Body Blade that generates a wave action to increase stability demands.

However, if a tool like the Body Blade is unavailable, then a simple resistance band or tubing can suffice.

Address

2323 Smith St
Regina, SK
S4P 2P7

Opening Hours

10am - 1:30pm

Telephone

3067578889

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