Diocese of Albany Ministry for People with Disabilities / Different Gifts

Diocese of Albany Ministry for People with Disabilities / Different Gifts Diocese of Albany's Office of Deaf and Disabilities Ministry. To provide the means to assist those with varied physical, developmental and emotional abilities to participate fully in all aspects of their faith community including parishes and schools.

This page is for those interested in the inclusion of people with disabilities in the life of the church be it in a parish or school setting in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany.

Operating as usual

10/16/2021

For those who are wondering the article about Our House is in today’s paper

Photos from Xavier Society for the Blind's post
10/15/2021

Photos from Xavier Society for the Blind's post

10/11/2021
Photos from NAMI New York State's post
10/02/2021

Photos from NAMI New York State's post

Photos from NAMI New York State's post
09/30/2021

Photos from NAMI New York State's post

09/23/2021

#DailyPrayer

08/15/2021

🔥FIRE-D Up FRIDAYS🔥 Follow our Friday series of stories from our FIRE Family along our 25 Years! #InclusionRevolution #Celebrating25Years

Leo started at St. Elizabeth when he was in Pre-K. Prior to that school year I reached out to Mrs. Aubuchon to tour the school and talk with Jen Moreland, the Special Education Director, about Leo. They were both very kind, open and encouraging. The summer before classes started, Jen and Leo's para took time to visit with Leo's therapist and work towards a plan to help him be successful at school. I really appreciated that effort and knew we were in the right place. His teachers and classmates have always wanted to include Leo in all aspects of the school day. I am grateful for the FIRE foundation for making it possible for Leo to attend St. Elizabeth and for our school being open to Leo being fully included and part of a class. Inclusion is not just important for my son, but it allows all children to learn from each other and continue to break barriers and experience full diversity in school. This helps all children be comfortable, empathic, and open to knowing many people and eventually our world won't see differences.

This year has been tough with the pandemic but St. Elizabeth has worked hard to keep kids in school and to offer virtual learning when it was needed. This offered opportunities for all children to thrive, learn and grow. I have great peace of mind knowing Leo is in a safe and loving environment. It was always important to me that my children attend Catholic school. Even though Leo's older brothers have graduated and are attending college, I still want him to have what his siblings had and grow in faith at St. Elizabeth, our neighborhood Catholic school. I want him to receive his sacraments with his classmates and be a part of the wonderful loving community at St. Elizabeth."

~Susan Lopez, mom and FIRE school liason

A representative of the the Santabarbara family originally contacted me for assistance with arranging Michael’s Confirma...
08/15/2021

A representative of the the Santabarbara family originally contacted me for assistance with arranging Michael’s Confirmation. So happy for Michael and his family.

06/30/2021

Love this.

Instagram Photos
05/08/2021

Instagram Photos

04/17/2021

In 1970, the Autism Society launched an ongoing nationwide effort to promote autism awareness and assure that all affected by autism are able to achieve the highest quality of life possible.  In 1972, the Autism Society launched the first annual National Autistic Children’s week, which evolved into Autism Acceptance Month (AAM). This April, we continue our efforts to spread awareness, promote acceptance, and ignite change.

The Autism Society of America, the nation’s oldest leading grassroots autism organization, is proud to celebrate Autism Acceptance Month in April 2021 with its “Celebrate Differences” campaign. Designed to build a better awareness of the signs, symptoms, and realities of autism, #CelebrateDifferences focuses on providing information and resources for  communities to be more aware of autism, promote acceptance, and be more inclusive in everyday life.

The Autism Society recognizes that the prevalence of autism in the United States has risen from 1 in 125 children in 2010 to 1 in 54 in 2020 – recognizing this continued increase, the goal for AAM is to further increase awareness about autism signs, symptoms and opportunities through: information and referrals, events, printable and digital resources, and community partnerships with businesses and organizations dedicated to building inclusive experiences. #InclusionRevolution #BeKind #AutismAcceptance #differentnotless💙

Footsteps to Inspire Us: Women Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Blind and Low Vision, and Deaf-Blind
03/09/2021
Footsteps to Inspire Us: Women Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Blind and Low Vision, and Deaf-Blind

Footsteps to Inspire Us: Women Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Blind and Low Vision, and Deaf-Blind

March is Women's History Month. As we celebrate all the women in American and world history whose influence has shaped our lives, we should not forget the influences of women who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or low vision, and deaf-blind. At first you may not be able to think of any such women...

"Millions of children had relied on schools for mental health services that have now been restricted."  This, in combina...
02/01/2021
Surge of Student Suicides Pushes Las Vegas Schools to Reopen

"Millions of children had relied on schools for mental health services that have now been restricted." This, in combination with many stressors they may be facing due to the pandemic is leading to "surge" in su***des and forcing difficult decisions for schools.

Firmly linking teen su***des to school closings is difficult, but rising mental health emergencies and su***de rates point to the toll the pandemic lockdown is taking.

Thinking better about autism
01/13/2021
Thinking better about autism

Thinking better about autism

Grant Macaskill’s reflection on neurodiversity becomes a stimulus to renewal of faith.

09/14/2020
There's Never Been a Better Time

NCPD has many resources and has been a great gift to this diocese.

Watch this inspirational video relevant to the mission of the National Catholic Partnership on Disability, with a message from the executive director. To sup...

Diocese of Albany Ministry for People with Disabilities / Different Gifts's cover photo
07/14/2020

Diocese of Albany Ministry for People with Disabilities / Different Gifts's cover photo

06/28/2020
Autistic Priest

Autistic Priest

Disabled people, the new Vatican directory on catechesis says, “are not only the recipients of catechesis, but protagonists of evangelization. It is hoped that they themselves can be catechists and, with their testimony, transmit the faith more effectively.”

05/05/2020
Northern Rivers Family of Services

Northern Rivers Family of Services

May is #mentalhealthawareness month. Our Chief of Behavioral Health Services, David Rossetti, talks about the importance of fighting stigma and asking for help

UAlbany's Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (CARD Albany)
05/04/2020

UAlbany's Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (CARD Albany)

Join our Regional Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at NYU for a Web Ex Event - Mindfulness for Families of Children with ASD on Friday, May 8, 2020

Courageous article about how some people demonize our disabilities.
04/21/2020
Is Autism Demonic?

Courageous article about how some people demonize our disabilities.

There is a subset of Christianity in which the belief is prevalent that demons cause disabilities, or at least certain disabilities. This belief is discriminatory towards us (autistic people). It demonizes difference. By default, it makes us into a lesser category of people who are “in bondage” ...

For Autism Awareness Month: an interview with a priest diagnosed with autism only a few years ago.
04/13/2020

For Autism Awareness Month: an interview with a priest diagnosed with autism only a few years ago.

APRIL: AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH

Sharing the work of Father Mark Nolette, a priest with autism.
By Esther Garcia

While searching the web looking for resources of our Catholic faith for persons with disabilities, I came across the blog of Father Mark Nolette.

Fr. Mark has been a priest at the Diocese of Portland (Maine) since 1987, and in 2014 he was diagnosed with autism. He has served in Parish Ministry, chancery and tribunal work. He is the spiritual director of the Mission of St. Thorlak, an apostolate dedicated to recognizing the gifts of all members of the Body of Christ, particularly those with autism.

Fr. Mark, who was very kind to agree to a phone conversation, said that while working in parish ministry he has had the opportunity to see the challenges that persons with autism have in the church. His personal experience helped him to make the community more aware, and become more welcoming.

How the faithful can engage with persons with autism and their families in the parish community?

Fr. Mark advises to be sensitive to several issues:

Sensory: Provide opportunities for families to attend Mass where persons with autism can be, without experiencing the overwhelming sensory input of the regular service.
Emotions: For some persons with autism, it is difficult to express their emotions, so don’t assume they don’t feel affection; it’s that they don’t usually show it.
Time to process: If you ask a question to a person with autism, don’t expect an immediate response; give them time to process the new information (sometimes it even takes days).
Social events: Social activities can be exhausting for persons with autism. It takes lots of their energy, so please be understanding.
Child behavior: don’t judge parents if their child is making noises or doesn’t have a typical behavior in Mass; this child may have autism, and the parents already feel overwhelmed. Help families to feel welcome and close to the church community.

He mentioned that during his priesthood formation, he didn’t have any training on disability/autism, but that “it would be very helpful for the seminary formation to have a session to learn about persons with autism and their families, basic understanding what autism is, the range of the spectrum and how this affects the persons and their families,” he said. “Learn from a person with autism, a parent or family member about their experience will help their ministry in supporting them.”

Fr. Mark's work is to bring Christ to those with autism and their families, and to recognize the importance of each one of us as part of the Body of Christ. To achieve this, he uses his blog, articles, his book of Scriptural Stations of the Cross for Autistic People and website.

We are very grateful with father Mark Nolette for sharing his knowledge and resources with us.

Esther Garcia is the NCPD Director of Outreach and Diocesan Relations.
[email protected] www.ncpd.org. For more NCPD autism resources go to https://ncpd.org/disability-ministry/autism-spectrum-disorder

Fr. Mark Nolette’s links
Blog
Priest. Hermit. Aspie.
https://www.theanchorite.net/about-me/

Book
Scriptural Stations of the Cross for Autistic People
by Rev. Mark P. Nolette
https://www.amazon.com/Scriptural-Stations-Cross-Autistic-People-ebook/dp/B07VKPZF81/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=stations+of+the+cross+mark+nolette&qid=1586274098&s=books&sr=1-1

Website
https://autismconsecrated.com

Article
https://portlanddiocese.org/harvest/bringing-people-autism-closer-christ

Important document from National Catholic Partnershipon Disability on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to Medical...
04/08/2020

Important document from National Catholic Partnership
on Disability on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to Medical Treatment During the COVID -19 Pandemic. Diocese of Albany Respect Life Diocese of Albany New York State Catholic Conference

Rights of Persons with Disabilities to Medical Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Statement from the Ethics and Public Policy, Board Committee of the National Catholic Partnership on Disability, April 7, 2020

The Ethics and Public Policy Committee of NCPD has prepared the statement and video introduction to assist anyone faced with a situation where lifesaving medical care is being rationed in ways that discriminate against persons with disabilities

You can find the statement and video on our website.
https://ncpd.org/covid-19-resources

Live streamed masses from the Archdiocese of Washington for Holy Week.
04/06/2020

Live streamed masses from the Archdiocese of Washington for Holy Week.

We are ever so grateful to Archbishop Gregory for ensuring that all the Holy Week Liturgies will be accessible to the Deaf Community! Please see below for the full schedule. The link for the YouTube channel can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/washarchdiocese

Autism Society of the Greater Capital Region, NY
04/03/2020

Autism Society of the Greater Capital Region, NY

Today is World Autism Awareness Day, and April is National Autism Awareness Month!

This month and every month, we work to spread awareness of factual information about autism, in order to promote acceptance and appreciation.

You can help us celebrate our community this month by adding this frame to your profile picture! Click here to try it out: www.facebook.com/profilepicframes/?selected_overlay_id=3004768789616927

Address

40 N Main Ave
Albany, NY
12203

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Comments

This article about my ministry was in the Times Union today. I am very proud of what we have accomplished in 8 years. My thanks to my Pastor and friend Patrick Butler for giving me the opportunity to serve the disabled population in our community
I wish to God this ministry had existed when my mother was widowed, disabled and poor with two children to raise. She lived less than a block from our parish church, to which we were all devoted, and was ignored completely by the clergy! No doubt, they were preoccupied cultivating the friendship of the wealthy.