CEMHD CEMHD is a collaborative, community-engaged research center focusing on minority health disparities in the smaller cities and towns of New York.

CEMHD is a collaborative effort focusing on minority health disparities in the smaller cities and towns of New York. We work toward eliminating minority health disparities by developing capacity in faculty at the University at Albany and by partnering with community groups to identify community health concerns and sources of disparities, plan strategies to alleviate them, and test their effectiveness.

Operating as usual

Tomorrow there will be a panel on The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity, this year's theme for Black...
02/17/2021

Tomorrow there will be a panel on The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity, this year's theme for Black History Month. The event will be hosted by Albany County Legislature on Facebook Live from 12pm-1pm EST.

Tomorrow there will be a panel on The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity, this year's theme for Black History Month. The event will be hosted by Albany County Legislature on Facebook Live from 12pm-1pm EST.

“This is an opportunity for everyone to get on board. These conversations about implicit bias are important because it i...
10/23/2020
Talking about implicit bias helps break down walls | LMH Health | Lawrence, KS

“This is an opportunity for everyone to get on board. These conversations about implicit bias are important because it is based on stereotypes and attitudes that have been embedded in our minds. We can bust down some shame and guilt because having implicit bias doesn’t mean we are bad people. Talking about this can allow walls to come down and conversations to continue.”

Implicit bias - the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner - is developed over the course of a lifetime. This bias can be harmful when personal attitudes and feelings influence health outcomes of others.

👁‍🗨⁣Capital District Latinos (CDL), an affiliate of the nonprofit Acacia Network, will host a special event, “Wellness W...
10/21/2020

👁‍🗨⁣Capital District Latinos (CDL), an affiliate of the nonprofit Acacia Network, will host a special event, “Wellness Workshops & Health Screenings for Men of Color,” in collaboration with the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities Prevention.⠀

This free event will feature onsite COVID-19 testing; prostate and colorectal cancer information; colorectal cancer screening for men 50 and older; mental health sessions with a certified psychologist; nutrition and wellness workshops; yoga and exercise; information on the effects of COVID-19 on men in the LGBTQ+ community, and more. ⠀

Register with Mickey Jimenez and join CDL this Saturday in Downtown Albany! ⁣⚕️

⁣⁣📮Check out our new Summer 2020 Newsletter (available now in both English & Spanish)!⠀▫️Read up on news pertaining to C...
10/09/2020

⁣⁣📮Check out our new Summer 2020 Newsletter (available now in both English & Spanish)!

▫️Read up on news pertaining to COVID-19 Disparities, recent Disparity Fellow Graduates, SUNY Downstate's SPRINTER Program Event, and more! 📊

🦠"⁣NPR, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conducted a five-part polling ...
09/17/2020

🦠"⁣NPR, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conducted a five-part polling series in July – August 2020 to examine the most serious health and financial problems facing households across America prior to the expiration of federal coronavirus support programs, with an aim to identify vulnerable populations in urgent need of government help or charitable aid."⠀

"⁣This report details the experiences of U.S. households, by the racial and ethnic identity of adult respondents. It highlights findings among three racial/ethnic minority communities in American society who are at high-risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19, and it examines other serious problems facing these populations at this period in the coronavirus outbreak."⠀

To access the full report, a link to a PDF can be found on our LinkTree!

Spoiledsocks Comics
08/04/2020

Spoiledsocks Comics

Since this is being shared around so much I might as well post it here with the original caption which included sources!

This page isn’t very active so consider going to Instagram 🙂 @spoiledsocks!

Sources:
globaljusticenow article: https://www.globaljustice.org.uk/blog/2020/apr/6/humanity-isnt-disease-ecofascism
World's richest 10% produce half of global carbon emissions: https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/extreme-carbon-inequality
the FAO's article on how indigenous people help the environment:http://www.fao.org/fao-stories/article/en/c/1203793/

💡‪#CEMHDSpotlight‬‪Congratulations to one of our recent Health Disparities Fellowship graduates, Melissa Noel! After rec...
07/28/2020

💡‪#CEMHDSpotlight‬
‪Congratulations to one of our recent Health Disparities Fellowship graduates, Melissa Noel! After receiving a Ph.D. from the School of Criminal Justice at UAlbany, Dr. Noel will begin a Post-Doc at American University in Washington DC this upcoming fall!‬

Characteristics of Persons Who Died with COVID-19 — United States, February 12–May 18, 2020
07/20/2020
Characteristics of Persons Who Died with COVID-19 — United States...

Characteristics of Persons Who Died with COVID-19 — United States, February 12–May 18, 2020

During January 1, 2020–May 18, 2020, approximately 1.3 million cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 83,000 COVID-19–associated deaths were reported in the United States (1).

👁‍🗨 “A colorblind approach to public health surveillance and response cannot bring about equity when both the health car...
07/16/2020
Racial disparities in COVID-19 are clear; better data, more targeted action needed

👁‍🗨 “A colorblind approach to public health surveillance and response cannot bring about equity when both the health care system and the structural conditions that inform it are so weak...”

Marked racial disparities exist in confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths, investigators say, and highlight urgent needs to ensure adequate testing and treatment are available to African Americans and safer working and living conditions are in place so they can better protect themselves.

👁‍🗨 Check out this newly published article in The New York Times, which highlights the disparities and racial inequity o...
07/06/2020
The Fullest Look Yet at the Racial Inequity of Coronavirus

👁‍🗨 Check out this newly published article in The New York Times, which highlights the disparities and racial inequity of COVID-19. In comparison to their white neighbors, “Latino and African-American residents of the United States have been three times as likely to become infected.”

New federal data provides the most comprehensive view to date of how Black and Latino people have been likelier than their white peers to contract the virus and die from it.

💡⁣#CEMHDSpotlightPostCheck out Dr. Wayne Lawrence’s newly published Op-Ed, “Public health experts can't 'stay out of pol...
06/23/2020
Commentary: Public health experts can't 'stay out of politics,' nor should they

💡⁣#CEMHDSpotlightPost
Check out Dr. Wayne Lawrence’s newly published Op-Ed, “Public health experts can't 'stay out of politics,' nor should they” in the Times Union!

Public health is political.
Humanity is political.

Thank you Wayne.

https://www.timesunion.com/opinion/article/Commentary-Public-health-experts-can-t-stay-out-15358314.php

Currently public health, a bedrock of our society, is crumbling. Increasingly, public...

⁣Please read the Albany Minority Health Task Force Position Paper on Racial Disparities in regards to COVID-19.⠀⠀(A link...
06/19/2020

⁣Please read the Albany Minority Health Task Force Position Paper on Racial Disparities in regards to COVID-19.⠀

(A link to the full PDF can be located in the linktree in our bio)

👁‍🗨 ⁣Director of the Center of the Elimination Minority Health Disparities, Dr. Lawrence M. Schell, recently published a...
06/18/2020

👁‍🗨 ⁣Director of the Center of the Elimination Minority Health Disparities, Dr. Lawrence M. Schell, recently published a letter in Times Union highlighting the severity of health disparities in Upstate New York impacting numerous Black American communities. ⠀

Investment within these communities is in desperate need.⠀

⁣👁‍🗨 This chart shows the high prevalence of health disparities within Black and African American communities during COV...
06/17/2020

⁣👁‍🗨 This chart shows the high prevalence of health disparities within Black and African American communities during COVID-19— research provided by the NYC Department of Health highlights that Black/African Americans outside NYC suffer even greater disparities and fatalities than Black/African American in NYC.⠀

Action needs to be taken to protect both these vulnerable communities within these locations— consistent investment with adequate interventions and access to treatments will allow these communities to fight our current pandemic with an equal opportunity.

Happening TONIGHT, a Panel discussion (hosted by the Capital District YMCA) on COVID-19 and its impact on Black and Brow...
06/17/2020

Happening TONIGHT, a Panel discussion (hosted by the Capital District YMCA) on COVID-19 and its impact on Black and Brown communities. A like to this discussion Zoom Conference Call can be located on our link tree.

⁣This fight did not just start. It has been fought again and again and again.⠀⠀⠀This pain is not new. It has been passed...
06/01/2020

⁣This fight did not just start. It has been fought again and again and again.⠀


This pain is not new. It has been passed on for generations.⠀


This movement should not stop here. Don’t be an ally just for today. Or tomorrow. Or until the end of the month.⠀


It is our duty to make this our life-long fight. This is for HUMANITY.⠀


Donate. Protest. Call out your racist family members. We all have a role to play. ⠀


#BlackLivesMatter⠀

⁣👁‍🗨John Hopkins Center for American Indian Health alongside the Indian Health Service have recently been developing and...
05/12/2020

⁣👁‍🗨John Hopkins Center for American Indian Health alongside the Indian Health Service have recently been developing and compiling different COVID-19 materials geared to the needs of tribal members. Check out the link that leads to accessing resources on their pages covering various topics to support providers, caregivers, parents, and more within tribal communities!⠀

We encourage you all to share these resources and others when possible as tribal members are consistently met with federal disinvestment and can gain a world of knowledge about the current pandemic through the access to educational materials. We wish everyone good health and safety as we all navigate this difficult time. 🌎


LINK: http://caih.jhu.edu/news/covid19

💡⁣#CEMHDSpotlightPost⠀⠀Check out Dr. Kaydian Reid’s Op-Ed on COVID-19 Health Disparities in the Hartford Courant! Dr. Ka...
05/06/2020

💡⁣#CEMHDSpotlightPost⠀

Check out Dr. Kaydian Reid’s Op-Ed on COVID-19 Health Disparities in the Hartford Courant! Dr. Kaydian Reid received her Doctor of Public Health from the University at Albany and is a former Presidential Health Disparities Doctoral Fellow at CEMHD. We applaud Dr. Reid in raising awareness of the racial and ethnic health disparities endured by communities all over the nation.⠀

⁣🦠 Here are some efforts and initiatives Dr. Kaydian Reid proposed in her article. CEMHD stands with Dr. Reid in her acknowledgment of the urgency within our communities and urges everyone to learn more about how this pandemic has hit communities of color the hardest.⠀

⁣**Link to Op-Ed: https://www.courant.com/opinion/op-ed/hc-op-reid-coronavirus-race-0503-20200502-ysyomu6r2fevvdu23ou5jcw7ty-story.html

🧠 Here are some psychological tips for managing concerns related to COVID-19, brought to you by the Counseling and Psych...
04/28/2020

🧠 Here are some psychological tips for managing concerns related to COVID-19, brought to you by the Counseling and Psychological Services at UAlbany. Read more about recognizing signs of distress and resources for coping during COVID-19. We hope everyone is keeping safe and healthy during this difficult time, and wish everyone a successful end to the semester! 💫

The Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IAS...
04/22/2020

The Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC MHPSS RG) recently published a short story titled “My Here is You: How kids can fight COVID-19!, highlighting the experiences of those affected by COVID-19 around the world. This story focused on accessing children’s mental health and psychological needs during these difficult times. This story is translated in various languages, including Arabic, Ukranian, Spanish, Italian, and French, to provide support to families in the form of storytelling to better work through this pandemic.

Link to accessing short story: https://interagencystandingcommittee.org/iasc-reference-group-mental-health-and-psychosocial-support-emergency-settings/my-hero-you

👁‍🗨 In the midst of a pandemic, the faults within the US healthcare system have been greatly shining through. Unfortunat...
04/20/2020

👁‍🗨 In the midst of a pandemic, the faults within the US healthcare system have been greatly shining through. Unfortunately, according to The New Yorker, the African-American aphorism of “When white America catches a cold, black America gets pneumonia” has become increasingly morbid. With COVID-19 affecting millions across the nation, the disproportional effects of this virus gives way to the statement that now, “When white America catches the coronavirus, black Americans die.”

Here is a closer look to how COVID-19 continues to impact our most vulnerable communities throughout the nation:

🔘In the small city of Albany, Georgia, “more than twelve hundred people in the county have confirmed COVID-19 cases, and at least 78 people have died." In addition, earlier reports state that “81% of the dead are African American.”

🔘 In Michigan, “African-Americans make up 14% of the state’s population, but account for 33% of its reported infections and 40% of its deaths.”

🔘 In Chicago, “African-Americans make up 53% of its reported infections and 40% of its deaths.”

🔘 “Testing in higher-income neighborhoods is 6x greater than it is in poorer neighborhoods.”

🔘 According to the NYT, “Annie Grant, a fifty-five-year-old black woman who worked at the Tyson Foods poultry plant in Camilla, Georgia, said that she was suffering from fevers and chills, and she told her children that she was ordered to return to work despite exhibiting symptoms of the virus."

Earlier this month, Annie passed away from COVID-19.

Now, it has been shown over generations that numerous institutions currently in place have contributed to the continuous birth of new disparities within marginalized communities. In the healthcare industry, it has been unfortunate to find that there has been a common notion that these communities (Black Americans especially) continue to experience these more unfavorable health outcomes and comorbidities due to their “dietary and exercise habits.”

However, the US healthcare industry fails to see how these types of stereotypical notions are inherently racist and serve to only disguise their lack of disinvestment and neglect in these communities, taking the easy way out to blame the most vulnerable for their own problems. And it does not stop at healthcare. There are many sectors of society that work against the well-being of minorities (i.e., Blacks workers being concentrated in low-wage “public-facing jobs” that are usually deemed as “essential”, mass incarceration of Black communities), and it should be noted that COVID-19 is not the root of the problem, but the system fighting it.

Source: https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/the-black-plague

04/20/2020

⁣‍👁‍🗨Here is a closer look to how COVID-19 continues to impact our most vulnerable communities throughout the nation:⠀

🔘In the small city of Albany, Georgia, “more than twelve hundred people in the county have confirmed COVID-19 cases, and at least 78 people have died." In addition, earlier reports state that “81% of the dead are African American.”⠀
🔘 In Michigan, “African-Americans make up 14% of the state’s population, but account for 33% of its reported infections and 40% of its deaths.”⠀
🔘 In Chicago, “African-Americans make up 53% of its reported infections and 40% of its deaths.”⠀
🔘 “Testing in higher-income neighborhoods is 6x greater than it is in poorer neighborhoods.”⠀
🔘 According to the NYT, “Annie Grant, a fifty-five-year-old black woman who worked at the Tyson Foods poultry plant in Camilla, Georgia, said that she was suffering from fevers and chills, and she told her children that she was ordered to return to work despite exhibiting symptoms of the virus."⠀

Earlier this month, Grant passed away from COVID-19.⠀

⁣Now, it has been shown over generations that numerous institutions currently in place have contributed to the continuous birth of new disparities within marginalized communities. In the healthcare industry, it has been unfortunate to find that there has been a common notion that these communities (Black Americans especially) continue to experience these more unfavorable health outcomes and comorbidities due to their “dietary and exercise habits.”⠀

However, the US healthcare industry fails to see how these types of stereotypical notions are inherently racist and serve to only disguise their lack of disinvestment and neglect in these communities, taking the easy way out to blame the most vulnerable for their own problems. And it does not stop at healthcare. There are many sectors of society that work against the well-being of minorities (i.e., Blacks workers being concentrated in low-wage “public-facing jobs” that are usually deemed as “essential”, mass incarceration of Black communities), and it should be noted that COVID-19 is not the root of the problem, but the system fighting it.

Source: https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/the-black-plague

💡#CEMHDSpotlightPostFor our very first #CEMHDSpotlightPost, we would like to introduce you to one of our Presidential He...
04/06/2020

💡#CEMHDSpotlightPost

For our very first #CEMHDSpotlightPost, we would like to introduce you to one of our Presidential Health Disparities Doctoral Fellows, the incredible Wayne Lawrence! Continue to read to learn more about his life, his journey to public health, and the monumental work he continues to do. ✨

At first, public health was not always a field Wayne Lawrence sought out to pursue. He at first picked up the physical therapy route, however, soon then realized it was not his cup of tea. One day after meeting with his career advisor, he gained more insight into public health, and from that day on, he was encouraged to pursue what was an unfamiliar area of study. At the end of his undergraduate career, Wayne Lawrence earned his bachelor's degree in Health Sciences at the University of Hartford and then went on to begin his journey of fighting for health equity.

During his time at Hartford, Wayne got the opportunity to intern at a local health department serving low-income communities in the city of Newburgh. There, he learned how greatly one’s zip code affects one’s health outcomes. As the days went on, he quickly picked up on what was reality for many living in Newburgh: diseases and illnesses (i.e., cardiovascular disease, lead poisoning, and asthma) were significantly higher there than in the area he lived in. The differences in health outcomes between this location and his hometown became questionable to Wayne, which quickly sparked his great curiosity to understand how impactful one’s address ultimately affects one’s health. As he continued to fall in love with the world of Epidemiology, he then went off to earn a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology at Georgia Southern University. During his time at GSU, Wayne got the opportunity to work abroad in countries such as Ghana, Australia, and New Zealand among indigenous populations.

Later, he went on to become a doctoral candidate and Presidential Health Disparities Doctoral Fellow in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics here at the University at Albany. Wayne is currently one of the fellows at the Center for the Elimination of Minority Health Disparities (CEMHD) aiming to gain more knowledge and expertise in eliminating health disparities. The interdisciplinary work centered around reducing health disparities at the CEMHD is what gravitated him towards this program. Wayne points out the fact that the health field alone cannot eliminate all disparities and that different societal sectors also play a part.

Currently, Wayne is working on a personal project with the research focus of identifying the relationship between mental health and cancer outcomes, specifically how and which mental illnesses are related to breast cancer outcomes in women. He intends to identify which mental illnesses are associated with increased cancer mortality compared to cardiovascular mortality, and ultimately, centers his work on identifying the most vulnerable population and what factors contribute to their vulnerability.

He emphasizes the fact that Medicaid is the largest single payer when it comes to people with severe mental illnesses, and points out that those receiving breast cancer care with Medicaid compared to those with private insurance tend to experience less favorable cancer outcomes. Waynes adds that this is due to the fact those that are Medicaid insured are less likely to follow up with a physician or adhere to treatment, compared to those privately insured. Overall, Wayne’s mission is to identify how the U.S. healthcare system is failing these vulnerable populations, as well as the impact that advanced comorbidities (simultaneous presence of two illnesses within a person) have on those that are economically disadvantaged. Wayne seeks to find where the nation fails to care for certain populations and to play a part in informing these populations that are generally overlooked.

As a graduate student, Wayne highlights issues that are currently prevalent in the classroom, specifically those that directly affect minority students. He points out that there is a low-percentage of professors that are either Black or Hispanic, and emphasizes on how the lack of representation causes the very few minority professors to carry the burden of every student of color. Wayne believes that one person cannot help all minority groups in the ways they each need, and that diversity in the faculty can provide more opportunities for students to receive effective guidance and support to thrive in and become more competitive after graduate school. Wayne highlights the unfortunate disparities that minority graduate students tend to face according to research, such as how non-Hispanic professors are less likely to respond to an email from a minority student or either select or recommend them for a research project. He asserts that more inclusion can offer a voice for graduate students experiencing disparities in the classroom, and offer minority faculty the opportunity to change the faults within the education system.

Aside from fighting health disparities on a daily basis, Wayne still likes to have fun. Some fun facts of Wayne include: that he enjoys taking bachata and salsa classes with other fellows at the CEMHD, and that his favorite movies are “Friday” and “Training Day.” He is a strong believer in making sure to have an outlet outside one’s work environment and not always being on the defense side of an attack, which leaves space to connect with peers on a deeper level than the classroom allows.

Currently, Wayne is in his fifth year and is on the track to graduate this semester. He intends to continue his work in health disparities centered around cancer. He is also excited to gain new skill sets in cancer research as he has been selected to be a cancer fellow at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Wayne is looking forward to participating in a multidisciplinary program that provides different aspects of cancer research. This program specifically involves both cancer prevention and survivorship.

As a Black man in the United States and having witnessed health disparities in his own family and community, working in public health has always felt like a calling to Wayne. Wayne has a message for students interested in public health: he encourages them to seek real reasons to be in the field, and once they find it, to do all they can to gain as much knowledge in that area. These, he says, can bring to fruition the change needed in their communities. ☤

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Thursday 10am - 4pm

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