Concierge Services of Augusta

Concierge Services of Augusta Lori Greenhill RN BSN is a freelance writer & speaker, a Care Partner with families,a Nurse Consultant for attorneys in need of clarity with complex cases.
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Lori Greenhill RN BSN is a freelance writer & speaker, utilizing her knowledge & expertise to provide written and spoken content to help educate, motivate, and increase public awareness for a variety of medical and non-medical needs. Lori is also a Care Partner (1-to-1) with families (caregivers) to construct a blueprint for their loved one's long term care. As a Nurse Consultant, Lori helps attorneys who are searching for clarity with a complex case. Of huge concern to Lori is the Health Status of our Nation. As a nurse, Lori uniquely connects quality of life issues to today's current events in an effort to improve communication between the policy-writers and decision-makers with the community (the constituents). Ultimately, there is a huge need for a better understanding of the impacts that are experienced in the community resulting from poor policies, laws, and decisions. Without effective communication, this need will never be understood, because unless you have lived it you cannot imagine it! #caregiver #help #CarePartner #Writer #Speaker #Investigative Research #Nurse #NurseConsultant #Consultant #Attorney

Tai chi moves can be easily learned and executed by people of all ages and states of health, even elderly people in whee...
09/12/2018
Using Tai Chi to Build Strength

Tai chi moves can be easily learned and executed by people of all ages and states of health, even elderly people in wheelchairs.

Watching a group of people doing tai chi, an exercise often called “meditation in motion,” it may be hard to imagine that its slow, gentle, choreographed movements could actually make people stronger. Not only stronger mentally but stronger physically and healthier as well.

I certainly was surprised by its effects on strength, but good research — and there’s been a fair amount of it by now — doesn’t lie. If you’re not ready or not able to tackle strength-training with weights, resistance bands or machines, tai chi may just be the activity that can help to increase your stamina and diminish your risk of injury that accompanies weak muscles and bones.

Don’t get scared by its frequent description as an “ancient martial art.” Tai chi (and a related exercise called Qigong) does not resemble the strenuous, gravity-defying karate moves you may have seen in Jackie Chan films. Tai chi moves can be easily learned and executed by people of all ages and states of health, even those in their 90s, in wheelchairs or bedridden.

It’s been eight years since I last summarized the known benefits of this time-honored form of exercise, and it has since grown in popularity in venues like Y’s, health clubs and community and senior centers. By now it is likely that millions more people have become good candidates for the help tai chi can provide to their well-being.

First, a reprise of what I previously wrote as to why most of us should consider including tai chi into our routines for stronger bodies and healthier lives.

It is a low-impact activity suitable for people of all ages and most states of health, including those who have long been sedentary or “hate” exercise.

It is a gentle, relaxing activity that involves deep breathing but does not work up a sweat or leave you out of breath.

It does not place undue stress on joints and muscles and therefore is unlikely to cause pain or injury.

It requires no special equipment or outfits, only lightweight, comfortable clothing.

Once proper technique is learned from a qualified instructor, it is a low-cost activity that can be practiced anywhere, anytime.

One more fact: Beneficial results from tai chi are often quickly realized. Significant improvements involving a host of different conditions can be achieved within 12 weeks of tai chi exercises done for an hour at a time twice a week.

Much of the research, which was reviewed in 2015 by researchers at Beijing University and Harvard Medical School, has focused on how tai chi has helped people with a variety of medical problems. It is summarized in a new book from Harvard Health Publications, “An Introduction to Tai Chi,” which includes the latest studies of healthy people whose mission was health preservation as well as people with conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis and osteoporosis.

Of the 507 studies included in the 2015 review, 94.1 percent found positive effects of tai chi. These included 192 studies involving only healthy participants, 142 with the goal of health promotion or preservation and 50 seeking better balance or prevention of falls.

This last benefit may be the most important of all, given that every 11 seconds an older adult is treated in the emergency room following a fall, and one in five falls results in a fracture, concussion or other serious injury.

For example, in an analysis of high-quality studies published last year in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers at the University of Jaen in Spain reported that older adults who did one-hour tai chi sessions one to three times a week for 12 to 26 weeks were 43 percent less likely to fall and half as likely to incur a fall-related injury.

Tai chi provided superior benefits to other fall-reduction approaches like physical therapy, balance exercises, stretching, yoga or resistance training. Tai chi, in effect, combines the benefits of most of these: It strengthens the lower body, improves posture, promotes flexibility, increases a person’s awareness of where the body is in space and improves one’s ability to navigate obstacles while walking.

Furthermore, if you should trip, tai chi can enhance your ability to catch yourself before you fall. It has also been shown to counter the fear of falling, which discourages people from being physically active and further increases their likelihood of falling and being injured.

Even if you do fall, tai chi, as a weight-bearing but low-stress exercise, can reduce your chances of breaking a bone. Four well-designed clinical trials showed that tai chi has positive effects on bone health. For example, in a yearlong study in Hong Kong of 132 women past menopause, those practicing tai chi experienced significantly less bone loss and fewer fractures than those who remained sedentary.

For people with painful joints and muscles, tai chi enhances their ability to exercise within a pain-free range of motion. Pain discourages people from moving, which makes matters worse as muscles get weaker and joints stiffer. The movements involved in tai chi minimize stress on painful areas and, by improving circulation, can foster relief and healing.

A 2016 study of 204 people with knee pain from osteoarthritis found that tai chi done twice a week was just as effective as physical therapy in relieving their discomfort. But that was not all: Those doing tai chi for the 12 weeks reported that they were less depressed and had a better quality of life than those undergoing physical therapy.

Tai chi can also be an entry point for people who may have fallen off the exercise wagon but want to get back to doing more vigorous and often more enjoyable physical activities like swimming and hiking, or biking and walking to and from errands instead of relying on vehicles that pollute the air and clog the roads.

Guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that sedentary older adults begin with balance, flexibility and strength training exercises before launching into moderate to vigorous physical activity. Tai chi is ideal for getting people ready for more demanding action.

And, in the process of getting your body in shape with tai chi, you’re likely to improve your mental state. In a New Zealand study of college students, tai chi was shown to counter depression, anxiety and stress. It also enhances an important quality called self-efficacy — confidence in one’s ability to perform various activities and overcome obstacles to doing so.

This is the second of two columns on countering muscle loss. The first is here.

Jane Brody is the Personal Health columnist, a position she has held since 1976. She has written more than a dozen books including the best sellers “Jane Brody’s Nutrition Book” and “Jane Brody’s Good Food Book.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/10/well/move/using-tai-chi-to-build-strength.html?action=click&module=Discovery&pgtype=Homepage

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Tai chi moves can be easily learned and executed by people of all ages and states of health, even elderly people in wheelchairs.

09/01/2018
Lori

FDA WARNING FOR DIABETICS - The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning diabetes patients that some drugs may cause a flesh-eating bacterial infection of the genitals.

The FDA issued the warning on Wednesday. Cases of Fournier's gangrene have been reported in connection with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

The drugs help the body lower blood-sugar levels via the kidneys, and excess sugar is excreted in a patient's urine. Urinary tract infections are a known side effect.

The SGLT2 inhibitors approved by the FDA include Johnson & Johnson's Invokana, Eli Lilly & Co's Jardiance, as well those from Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca Plc, Merck & Co and Pfizer Inc.

Patients are at risk for an infection known as Fournier’s gangrene, an extremely rare but life-threatening bacterial infection of the tissue under the skin that surrounds muscles, nerves, fat, and blood vessels of the perineum. The FDA said the bacteria usually gets into the body through a cut or break in the skin.

While having diabetes is a risk factor for the infection, it is still rare. Publications report Fournier's gangrene occurs in 1.6 out of 100,000 males annually in the U.S., and most frequently occurs in males 50-79 years.

The FDA said in the five years from March 2013-May 2018, they identified 12 cases of Fournier's gangrene in patients taking one of the inhibitors. This is compared to only six cases identified in a review of other antidiabetic drug cases over a period of more than 30 years.

The cases included 7 men and 5 women. All of the patients were hospitalized and required surgery.

The FDA said some patients required multiple disfiguring surgeries, some developed complications, and one patient died.

The FDA is concerned there may be additional cases that they are not aware of. Patients should seek medical help immediately if they experience any symptoms of tenderness, redness, or swelling of the genitals or the area from the genitals back to the rectum, and have a fever above 100.4 F or a general feeling of being unwell.

https://www.wjbf.com/…/fda-warns-of-rare-flesh-…/1409737471…

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FDA WARNING FOR DIABETICS - The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning diabetes patients that some drugs may cause a flesh-eating bacterial infection of the genitals.

The FDA issued the warning on Wednesday. Cases of Fournier's gangrene have been reported in connection with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

The drugs help the body lower blood-sugar levels via the kidneys, and excess sugar is excreted in a patient's urine. Urinary tract infections are a known side effect.

The SGLT2 inhibitors approved by the FDA include Johnson & Johnson's Invokana, Eli Lilly & Co's Jardiance, as well those from Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca Plc, Merck & Co and Pfizer Inc.

Patients are at risk for an infection known as Fournier’s gangrene, an extremely rare but life-threatening bacterial infection of the tissue under the skin that surrounds muscles, nerves, fat, and blood vessels of the perineum. The FDA said the bacteria usually gets into the body through a cut or break in the skin.

While having diabetes is a risk factor for the infection, it is still rare. Publications report Fournier's gangrene occurs in 1.6 out of 100,000 males annually in the U.S., and most frequently occurs in males 50-79 years.

The FDA said in the five years from March 2013-May 2018, they identified 12 cases of Fournier's gangrene in patients taking one of the inhibitors. This is compared to only six cases identified in a review of other antidiabetic drug cases over a period of more than 30 years.

The cases included 7 men and 5 women. All of the patients were hospitalized and required surgery.

The FDA said some patients required multiple disfiguring surgeries, some developed complications, and one patient died.

The FDA is concerned there may be additional cases that they are not aware of. Patients should seek medical help immediately if they experience any symptoms of tenderness, redness, or swelling of the genitals or the area from the genitals back to the rectum, and have a fever above 100.4 F or a general feeling of being unwell.

https://www.wjbf.com/lifestyle/health/fda-warns-of-rare-flesh-eating-genital-infection-linked-to-diabetes-medication/1409737471?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_WJBF_NewsChannel_6

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Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Director Gopal Khanna announced the AHRQ Step Up App Challenge today. ...
08/16/2018
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Director Gopal Khanna announced the AHRQ Step Up App Challenge today. This competition invites technologists to compete for cash prizes for the development of an app capable of collecting standardized patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data in a range of settings, including primary and specialty care practices. The total prize pool for the three-phase AHRQ Step Up App Challenge is $250,000. https://www.ahrq.gov/stepupappchallenge/index.html

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Director Gopal Khanna announced the AHRQ Step Up App Challenge today. This competition invites technologists to compete for cash prizes for the development of an app capable of collecting standardized patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data in a range of settings, including primary and specialty care practices. The total prize pool for the three-phase AHRQ Step Up App Challenge is $250,000. https://www.ahrq.gov/stepupappchallenge/index.html

Overview: Suicide is a leading cause of death in the US. Suicide rates increased in nearly every state from 1999 through...
08/10/2018
More than a mental health problem

Overview: Suicide is a leading cause of death in the US. Suicide rates increased in nearly every state from 1999 through 2016.

Mental health conditions are often seen as the cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. In fact, many people who die by suicide are NOT known to have a diagnosed mental health condition at the time of death.

Other problems often contribute to suicide, such as those related to relationships, substance use, physical health, and job, money, legal, or housing stress.

Making sure government, public health, healthcare, employers, education, the media and community organizations are working together is important for preventing suicide.

Public health departments can bring together these partners to focus on comprehensive state and community efforts with the greatest likelihood of preventing suicide.
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States and communities can:

1. Identify and support people at risk of suicide.

2. Teach coping and problem-solving skills to help people manage challenges with their relationships, jobs, health, or other concerns.

3. Promote safe and supportive environments. This includes safely storing medications and firearms to reduce access among people at risk.

4. Offer activities that bring people together so they feel connected and not alone.

5. Connect people at risk to effective and coordinated mental and physical healthcare.

6. Expand options for temporary help for those struggling to make ends meet.

7. Prevent future risk of suicide among those who have lost a loved one to suicide.
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What Can Be Done:

The Federal government is
Tracking the problem to describe trends, circumstances, and populations at greatest risk (for example, see www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs).

Developing, implementing, and evaluating suicide prevention strategies.

Working with local, state, tribal, national, and other partners to provide guidance and distribute suicide prevention tools (for example, see https://go.usa.gov/xQBGc).
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States and communities can:

Identify and support people at risk of suicide.
Teach coping and problem-solving skills to help people manage challenges with relationships, jobs, health, or other concerns.

Promote safe and supportive environments. This includes safely storing medications and firearms to reduce access among people at risk.

Offer activities that bring people together so they feel connected and not alone.

Connect people at risk to effective and coordinated mental and physical healthcare.

Expand options for temporary assistance for those struggling to make ends meet.

Prevent future risk of suicide among those who have lost a loved one to suicide.
.......................................
Health care systems can:

Provide high quality, ongoing care focused on patient safety and suicide prevention.

Make sure affordable and effective mental and physical healthcare is available where people live.

Train providers in adopting proven treatments for patients at risk of suicide.
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Employers can:

Promote employee health and well-being, support employees at risk, and have plans in place to respond to people showing warning signs.

Encourage employees to seek help, and provide referrals to mental health, substance use disorder, legal, or financial counseling services as needed.
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Everyone can:

Ask someone you are worried about if they’re thinking about suicide.

Keep them safe. Reduce access to lethal means for those at risk.

Be there with them. Listen to what they need.
Help them connect with ongoing support like the Lifeline (1-800-273-8255).

Follow up to see how they’re doing.

Find out how this can save a life by visiting: www.bethe1to.com.

MORE RESOURCES AND INFORMATION via the link below:

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/suicide/index.html

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Suicide rates rose across the US from 1999 to 2016.

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For a complete list of services: http://www.conciergeservicesofaugusta.com/ Follow Lori on Twitter: @lorigreenhill

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