Georgia Cancer Center

Georgia Cancer Center Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Georgia Cancer Center, Medical and health, 821 Saint Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA.
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Photos from Georgia Cancer Center's post
05/28/2021

Photos from Georgia Cancer Center's post

This month is Brain Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of canc...
05/28/2021

This month is Brain Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Friday. Today we are talking about the risk factors of brain cancer.

In most people with primary brain tumors, the cause of the tumor is not clear. But doctors have identified some factors that may increase your risk of a brain tumor.
Risk factors include:
* Exposure to radiation. People who have been exposed to a type of radiation called ionizing radiation have an increased risk of brain tumor. Examples of ionizing radiation include radiation therapy used to treat cancer and radiation exposure caused by atomic bombs.
* Family history of brain tumors. A small portion of brain tumors occurs in people with a family history of brain tumors or a family history of genetic syndromes that increase the risk of brain tumors.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio https://go.augusta.edu/3nUgcTW.

#cancer #cancersucks #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #braincancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter #cancerdiagnosis

Today the Georgia Cancer Center had the honor of having Adderson's Fresh Produce here to sell some fresh produce to our ...
05/27/2021

Today the Georgia Cancer Center had the honor of having Adderson's Fresh Produce here to sell some fresh produce to our employees and our patients. They had a variety of food and everything looked so healthy and yummy! Thank you to everyone who came to the Farmer's Market and purchased something. We hope you use these products to create some healthy and filling meals! #GCCDietitians #FarmersMarket

05/27/2021
A Cancer Conversation: Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The Georgia Cancer Center is launching a new series, "A Cancer Conversation," with a discussion on melanoma and skin cancer. May is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Chris Curry is having a conversation with Dr. Germame Ajebo about melanoma and skin cancer and what you should know.

This month is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of ca...
05/26/2021

This month is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Wednesday. Today we are talking about the different types of bladder cancer.

Different types of cells in your bladder can become cancerous. The type of bladder cell where cancer begins determines the type of bladder cancer. Doctors use this information to determine which treatments may work best for you.
Types of bladder cancer include:
* Urothelial carcinoma. Urothelial carcinoma, previously called transitional cell carcinoma, occurs in the cells that line the inside of the bladder. Urothelial cells expand when your bladder is full and contract when your bladder is empty. These same cells line the inside of the ureters and the urethra, and cancers can form in those places as well. Urothelial carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer in the United States.
* Squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with chronic irritation of the bladder — for instance, from an infection or from long-term use of a urinary catheter. Squamous cell bladder cancer is rare in the United States. It's more common in parts of the world where a certain parasitic infection (schistosomiasis) is a common cause of bladder infections.
* Adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma begins in cells that make up mucus-secreting glands in the bladder. Adenocarcinoma of the bladder is very rare.
Some bladder cancers include more than one type of cell.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio https://go.augusta.edu/3bOE3Pm. Stay tuned for Friday where we will discuss the risk factors of brain cancer.

#cancer #cancersucks #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #bladdercancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter #cancerdiagnosis

In honor of this month being Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness month, Dr. Germame Ajebo will be answering your question...
05/25/2021

In honor of this month being Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness month, Dr. Germame Ajebo will be answering your questions on our show A Cancer Conversation. We hope to see you Wednesday, May 26th at 3:30 pm. If you have any questions for Dr. Ajebo, please leave them in the comments below or feel free to direct message us if you wish to remain anonymous. We hope to see you there!

In honor of this month being Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness month, Dr. Germame Ajebo will be answering your questions on our show A Cancer Conversation. We hope to see you Wednesday, May 26th at 3:30 pm. If you have any questions for Dr. Ajebo, please leave them in the comments below or feel free to direct message us if you wish to remain anonymous. We hope to see you there!

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about fiber and how it can benefit your health. So how do you add fib...
05/25/2021

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about fiber and how it can benefit your health.

So how do you add fiber into your diet? Here are some quick tips:

Aim for 2+ servings of vegetables at lunch and dinner
Swap whole-grain or whole-wheat foods into your diet – such as pasta, rice, and bread.
Have a serving of fruit for dessert instead of a cookie or piece of cake

Gradual and small changes such as these can easily increase your fiber intake to your daily recommended amount. Just remember to increase your water intake as you do so. This will keep your gut happy and healthy!

#GCCDietitians

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about fiber and how it can benefit your health.

So how do you add fiber into your diet? Here are some quick tips:

Aim for 2+ servings of vegetables at lunch and dinner
Swap whole-grain or whole-wheat foods into your diet – such as pasta, rice, and bread.
Have a serving of fruit for dessert instead of a cookie or piece of cake

Gradual and small changes such as these can easily increase your fiber intake to your daily recommended amount. Just remember to increase your water intake as you do so. This will keep your gut happy and healthy!

#GCCDietitians

A new imaging agent will soon be available at the Georgia Cancer Center that will make brain tumors more visible to surg...
05/25/2021
New technology will allow neurosurgeons to see brain tumors better

A new imaging agent will soon be available at the Georgia Cancer Center that will make brain tumors more visible to surgeons. It’s called Gleolan and it turns malignant brain tumors fluorescent pink. This makes the tumors easier for neurosurgeons to see and separate from brain tissue. Kim Vickers WJBF talked with MCG neurosurgeon Dr. Martin Rutkowski about how this will be a game-changer in brain cancer surgery.

https://www.wjbf.com/top-stories/new-technology-will-allow-neurosurgeons-to-see-brain-tumors-better/?fbclid=IwAR2z0HV50JjYFAmQ397trmYgDQwaInGvR4ENCQWMZ45p71I5v3CUcuna10c

Augusta, GA (WJBF)- May is Brain Cancer Awareness month and the Georgia Cancer Center is working on a new technology to make brain surgeries a little easier. This year an estimated 25,000 people in…

This month is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this ...
05/24/2021

This month is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Monday. Today we are talking about the prevention of melanoma and skin cancer.

You can reduce your risk of melanoma and other types of skin cancer if you:
* Avoid the sun during the middle of the day. For many people in North America, the sun's rays are strongest between about 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Schedule outdoor activities for other times of the day, even in winter or when the sky is cloudy.�You absorb UV radiation year-round, and clouds offer little protection from damaging rays. Avoiding the sun at its strongest helps you avoid the sunburns and suntans that cause skin damage and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. Sun exposure accumulated over time also may cause skin cancer.
* Wear sunscreen year-round. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, even on cloudy days. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you're swimming or perspiring.
* Wear protective clothing. Cover your skin with dark, tightly woven clothing that covers your arms and legs, and a broad-brimmed hat, which provides more protection than does a baseball cap or visor.� Don't forget sunglasses. Look for those that block both types of UV radiation — UVA and UVB rays.
* Avoid tanning lamps and beds. Tanning lamps and beds emit UV rays and can increase your risk of skin cancer.
* Be aware of sun-sensitizing medications. Some common prescription and over-the-counter drugs, including antibiotics, can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight.
* Become familiar with your skin so that you'll notice changes. Examine your skin often for new skin growths or changes in existing moles, freckles, bumps and birthmarks.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio. https://go.augusta.edu/3384ls3. Stay tuned for Wednesday where we will discuss the different type of bladder cancer.

#cancer #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #melanoma #skincancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter

This month is Brain Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of canc...
05/21/2021

This month is Brain Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Friday. Today we are talking about the causes of brain cancer.

The exact cause of brain cancer is unknown. However, factors that can increase your risk of brain cancer include exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation and a family history of brain cancer. Cancer in another part of your body is also a risk factor for developing a tumor in the brain, though these aren’t called brain cancer. They are cancers that have spread to the brain. Cancers that commonly spread, or metastasize, to the brain include: lung cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, bladder cancer, and melanoma, which is a type of skin cancer.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio https://go.augusta.edu/3nUgcTW. Stay tuned for Monday where will discuss how to prevent melanoma and skin cancer.

#cancer #cancersucks #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #braincancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter #cancerdiagnosis

Today is Clinical Research Day and we want to thank all of our researchers for their amazing work in the Georgia Cancer ...
05/20/2021

Today is Clinical Research Day and we want to thank all of our researchers for their amazing work in the Georgia Cancer Labs. They work tirelessly for our cancer patients both current and future to find ways to better improve their treatment and hopefully, one day find a cure. Thank you again to all of the researchers on Clinical Research Day. #ClinicalResearchDay

Today is Clinical Research Day and we want to thank all of our researchers for their amazing work in the Georgia Cancer Labs. They work tirelessly for our cancer patients both current and future to find ways to better improve their treatment and hopefully, one day find a cure. Thank you again to all of the researchers on Clinical Research Day. #ClinicalResearchDay

This month is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of ca...
05/19/2021

This month is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Wednesday. Today we are talking about the risk factors for bladder cancer.

Factors that may increase bladder cancer risk include:
* Smoking
* Increasing age. Bladder cancer risk increases as you age. Though it can occur at any age, most people diagnosed with bladder cancer are older than 55.
* Being male. Men are more likely to develop bladder cancer than women are.
* Exposure to certain chemicals. Your kidneys play a key role in filtering harmful chemicals from your bloodstream and moving them into your bladder. Because of this, it's thought that being around certain chemicals may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Chemicals linked to bladder cancer risk include arsenic and chemicals used in the manufacture of dyes, rubber, leather, textiles and paint products.
* Previous cancer treatment. Treatment with the anti-cancer drug cyclophosphamide increases the risk of bladder cancer. People who received radiation treatments aimed at the pelvis for a previous cancer have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer.
* Chronic bladder inflammation. Chronic or repeated urinary infections or inflammations (cystitis), such as might happen with long-term use of a urinary catheter, may increase the risk of a squamous cell bladder cancer. In some areas of the world, squamous cell carcinoma is linked to chronic bladder inflammation caused by the parasitic infection known as schistosomiasis.
* Personal or family history of cancer. If you've had bladder cancer, you're more likely to get it again. If one of your blood relatives — a parent, sibling or child — has a history of bladder cancer, you may have an increased risk of the disease, although it's rare for bladder cancer to run in families.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio https://go.augusta.edu/3bOE3Pm. Stay tuned for Friday where we will discuss the causes of brain cancer.

#cancer #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #bladdercancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about processed and red meats and how they can be linked to cancer. A...
05/18/2021

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about processed and red meats and how they can be linked to cancer. A recent report by AICR (American Institute for Cancer Research) revealed a link between red meats and colorectal cancer.

How much fiber do you need?

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that women consume 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day, and men consume 30 to 38 grams a day. A food is considered high in fiber when it contains greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving.

A few high fiber foods include:

1/2 cup cooked kidney beans – 7 grams
1 cup of raspberries – 6.5 grams
1 cup of lentils – 13.1 grams
1 cup of raw oats – 16.5 grams
1 cup of popcorn – 14.4 grams
1 oz of chia seeds – 9.75 grams

#GCCDietitians

This month our GCC Dietitians are giving you facts about processed and red meats and how they can be linked to cancer. A recent report by AICR (American Institute for Cancer Research) revealed a link between red meats and colorectal cancer.

How much fiber do you need?

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that women consume 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day, and men consume 30 to 38 grams a day. A food is considered high in fiber when it contains greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving.

A few high fiber foods include:

1/2 cup cooked kidney beans – 7 grams
1 cup of raspberries – 6.5 grams
1 cup of lentils – 13.1 grams
1 cup of raw oats – 16.5 grams
1 cup of popcorn – 14.4 grams
1 oz of chia seeds – 9.75 grams

#GCCDietitians

05/18/2021

In this episode of "A Cancer Conversation" with the Georgia Cancer Center, we discuss brain cancer with Dr. John Henson. Dr. Henson is a neuro-oncologist who joined the team in January. He shares his plan for building a brain cancer program and what it takes to deliver the best care to our patients.

05/17/2021
A Cancer Conversation: Bladder Cancer Awareness Month

The Georgia Cancer Center is launching a new series, "A Cancer Conversation," with a discussion on bladder cancer. May is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month and Chris Curry is having a conversation with Dr. Martha Terris about bladder cancer and what you should know.

This month is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this ...
05/17/2021

This month is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month so the Georgia Cancer Center is providing you with facts on this type of cancer every Monday. Today we are talking about the risk factors for melanoma and skin cancer.

Factors that may increase your risk of skin cancer include:
* Fair skin. Anyone, regardless of skin color, can get skin cancer. However, having less pigment (melanin) in your skin provides less protection from damaging UV radiation.
* A history of sunburns.
* Excessive sun exposure. Tanning, including exposure to tanning lamps and beds, also puts you at risk. A tan is your skin's injury response to excessive UV radiation.
* Sunny or high-altitude climates. People who live in sunny, warm climates are exposed to more sunlight than are people who live in colder climates. Living at higher elevations, where the sunlight is strongest, also exposes you to more radiation.
* Moles. People who have many moles or abnormal moles called dysplastic nevi are at increased risk of skin cancer. These abnormal moles — which look irregular and are generally larger than normal moles — are more likely than others to become cancerous. If you have a history of abnormal moles, watch them regularly for changes.
* Precancerous skin lesions. Having skin lesions known as actinic keratoses can increase your risk of developing skin cancer. These precancerous skin growths typically appear as rough, scaly patches that range in color from brown to dark pink. They're most common on the face, head and hands.
* A family history of skin cancer.
* A personal history of skin cancer.
* A weakened immune system.
* Exposure to radiation.
* Exposure to certain substances. Exposure to certain substances, such as arsenic, may increase your risk of skin cancer.

To learn more and to speak to a specialist check out the link here or in our bio. https://go.augusta.edu/3384ls3. Stay tuned for Wednesday where we will discuss the risk factors are for bladder cancer.

#cancer #cancersucks #cancerawareness #cancerprevention #cancermonth #maycancermonth #maycancerawareness #cancerawarenessmonth #melanoma #skincancer #cancerresearch #cancereducation #gcc #georgiacancercenter #cancerdiagnosis

Address

821 Saint Sebastian Way
Augusta, GA
30912

Opening Hours

Monday 07:00 - 17:30
Tuesday 07:00 - 17:30
Wednesday 07:00 - 17:30
Thursday 07:00 - 17:30
Friday 07:00 - 17:30

Telephone

(706) 721-2971

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Empowering Patients through our Services

The Augusta University Radiation Therapy Center in Augusta is a regional free-standing facility located near the Georgia Cancer Center and Research facility. The radiation oncology team includes board-certified radiation oncologists with years of experience in caring for cancer patients assisted by qualified medical physicists, Dosimetrist, radiation therapists, and nursing support staff. The radiation oncology team executes extensive 3D radiotherapy plans tailored to meet the patient’s unique needs. These modern radiation treatments combined with full delivery of a prescribed dose to the cancerous tumor assists in the successful treatment of various forms of cancers.

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