Southwest Center for Independence

Southwest Center for Independence Disability Rights We envision a world where all people with disabilities are valued friends and neighbors, receiving the supports they need to lead the lives they desire, defining their own quality of life and contributing back to the community.

Operating as usual

Southwest Center for Independence is looking to create a Peer Group for all LGBTQ+ identified folks living with disabili...
09/20/2021
SWCI LGBTQ Group

Southwest Center for Independence is looking to create a Peer Group for all LGBTQ+ identified folks living with disabilities, and we want to hear from you! This will be a bimonthly group with one virtual discussion space and one outdoor in person group activity. Tell us what you want the rest of it to look like!

SWCI is looking to create a Peer Group for all LGBTQ+ identified folks living with disabilities, and we want to hear from you! This will be a bimonthly group with one virtual discussion space and one outdoor in person group activity. Tell us how you want the rest of it to look like!

09/20/2021
NCIL’s Commitment to People with Intellectual DisabilitiesAccessibility and inclusion are very important. They are impor...
09/18/2021

NCIL’s Commitment to People with Intellectual Disabilities

Accessibility and inclusion are very important. They are important for all people with disabilities. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that there are 6 million people with intellectual disabilities. The National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) wants to make sure that people with intellectual disabilities can be members and leaders, just like any other person with a disability. This is why we want to make changes to everything that we do. We want to make sure that NCIL is accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities. This includes our meetings, rules (also called “bylaws” or “standard operating procedures”), trainings, conferences, and how we talk with our members.

The people that work at NCIL have wanted to do this work for a long time. We met last year and made a plan. But, because of COVID-19, our work at NCIL had to change. We had to spend more time doing things we didn’t normally do in order to work from home. We had to spend a lot of time focusing on new issues. We have not been able to work on the plan we made as fast as we thought we would.

But, we are still committed to making sure that we are accessible and inclusive to all people with disabilities. Another word for “commitment” is “promise”. We promise to do this work and are starting to do what we can right now. One thing that we are starting is writing our statements in plain language as much as we can. That is just one thing we are doing, and we know that there is a lot more work to do.

While we are working to make NCIL accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities, we are also learning more about what works. These are called “promising practices.” We want to share what we are learning with other organizations that serve people with disabilities, too. One promising practice is this: instead of writing plain language versions of statements, we are sometimes writing statements only in plain language.

The most important part of this work will be making sure that people with intellectual disabilities can also be leaders and employees at NCIL. This is how people with intellectual disabilities can help make these commitments a reality. NCIL’s new executive director, Reyma, was the executive director of a Center for Independent Living (CIL). Her CIL helped many people with intellectual disabilities with their careers. Before Reyma worked at that CIL, she led Iowa’s largest community-based program that helped people with intellectual disabilities with their careers. Reyma would like to use her skills to make sure that NCIL is a place where everyone, especially people with intellectual disabilities, can work and be a leader.

If you have any questions about NCIL’s commitment to making sure we are accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities, please contact Reyma at [email protected].

NCIL’s Commitment to People with Intellectual Disabilities

Accessibility and inclusion are very important. They are important for all people with disabilities. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that there are 6 million people with intellectual disabilities. The National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) wants to make sure that people with intellectual disabilities can be members and leaders, just like any other person with a disability. This is why we want to make changes to everything that we do. We want to make sure that NCIL is accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities. This includes our meetings, rules (also called “bylaws” or “standard operating procedures”), trainings, conferences, and how we talk with our members.

The people that work at NCIL have wanted to do this work for a long time. We met last year and made a plan. But, because of COVID-19, our work at NCIL had to change. We had to spend more time doing things we didn’t normally do in order to work from home. We had to spend a lot of time focusing on new issues. We have not been able to work on the plan we made as fast as we thought we would.

But, we are still committed to making sure that we are accessible and inclusive to all people with disabilities. Another word for “commitment” is “promise”. We promise to do this work and are starting to do what we can right now. One thing that we are starting is writing our statements in plain language as much as we can. That is just one thing we are doing, and we know that there is a lot more work to do.

While we are working to make NCIL accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities, we are also learning more about what works. These are called “promising practices.” We want to share what we are learning with other organizations that serve people with disabilities, too. One promising practice is this: instead of writing plain language versions of statements, we are sometimes writing statements only in plain language.

The most important part of this work will be making sure that people with intellectual disabilities can also be leaders and employees at NCIL. This is how people with intellectual disabilities can help make these commitments a reality. NCIL’s new executive director, Reyma, was the executive director of a Center for Independent Living (CIL). Her CIL helped many people with intellectual disabilities with their careers. Before Reyma worked at that CIL, she led Iowa’s largest community-based program that helped people with intellectual disabilities with their careers. Reyma would like to use her skills to make sure that NCIL is a place where everyone, especially people with intellectual disabilities, can work and be a leader.

If you have any questions about NCIL’s commitment to making sure we are accessible and inclusive to people with intellectual disabilities, please contact Reyma at [email protected].

BETTER CARE BETTER JOBS ACT - #MedicaidCantWait for this long-overdue support! As part of a COVID-19 economic recovery p...
09/18/2021

BETTER CARE BETTER JOBS ACT - #MedicaidCantWait for this long-overdue support!

As part of a COVID-19 economic recovery package, the bill includes a long-overdue investment in the disability service system that will support care for Medicaid recipients as well as create more and better jobs for the workforce that provides that care.

We must ask Members of Congress to enact legislation that lives up to this plan and do more for people with disabilities, their families, and the direct care workforce!

Senator Bennet is on board to support BCBJA, but Senator Hickenlooper is not yet committed to serving the needs of the disability community. Join people with disabilities and our allies to visit John Hickenlooper's offices around the state this coming Tuesday September 21st to share stories of our experiences with Medicaid & HCBS, and express our needs.

Sign up to visit the Durango office (329 South Camino del Rio
Suite I - Cory Gardner's old office) at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/deliver-a-message-senator-hickenlooper-invest-in-our-care-industry-tickets-170523295768

Learn more and/or send a message if you can't go in person, via https://capitolcontact.com/portal/#/view/886

BETTER CARE BETTER JOBS ACT - #MedicaidCantWait for this long-overdue support!

As part of a COVID-19 economic recovery package, the bill includes a long-overdue investment in the disability service system that will support care for Medicaid recipients as well as create more and better jobs for the workforce that provides that care.

We must ask Members of Congress to enact legislation that lives up to this plan and do more for people with disabilities, their families, and the direct care workforce!

Senator Bennet is on board to support BCBJA, but Senator Hickenlooper is not yet committed to serving the needs of the disability community. Join people with disabilities and our allies to visit John Hickenlooper's offices around the state this coming Tuesday September 21st to share stories of our experiences with Medicaid & HCBS, and express our needs.

Sign up to visit the Durango office (329 South Camino del Rio
Suite I - Cory Gardner's old office) at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/deliver-a-message-senator-hickenlooper-invest-in-our-care-industry-tickets-170523295768

Learn more and/or send a message if you can't go in person, via https://capitolcontact.com/portal/#/view/886

Durango Fire & Rescue, in collaboration with Community Connections and local disabled advocates, is offering an AMAZING,...
09/18/2021

Durango Fire & Rescue, in collaboration with Community Connections and local disabled advocates, is offering an AMAZING, free, in-home and hands-on, fire safety training for people with disabilities living in the Durango Fire Department service area (borders are Coal Bank pass, Florida River, State Line, Hesperus Hill).
Get help and education to do things like develop and practice an evacuation plan, practice using fire safety equipment, learn what to expect when you make an emergency call!
Call and schedule your training today!

Durango Fire & Rescue, in collaboration with CCI, and local disabled advocates, is offering an AMAZING, free, in-home and hands-on, fire safety training for people with disabilities living in the Durango Fire Department service area (borders are Coal Bank pass, Florida River, State Line, Hesperus Hill).

Get help and education to do things like develop and practice an evacuation plan, practice using fire safety equipment, learn what to expect when you make an emergency call!

Call and schedule your training today!

09/18/2021
J.C. Smith said Black American Sign Language, or BASL, is vital to preserve “because it’s our language. It's our gesture...
09/16/2021
Preserving Black American Sign Language in the Deaf community

J.C. Smith said Black American Sign Language, or BASL, is vital to preserve “because it’s our language. It's our gestures, it's our vibes. It's how we communicate, how we are able to talk.”

"It felt so free to me. It felt good to just communicate. You know, that was who I was. That was my culture. That was my identity.”

credit Dan Wilkins for the poster Our homes, not nursing homes!
09/14/2021

credit Dan Wilkins for the poster
Our homes, not nursing homes!

credit Dan Wilkins for the poster
Our homes, not nursing homes!

09/04/2021

26 y/o quadriplegic male in Durango, Colorado in need of caregivers through CDASS! CNA license a or experience a plus but not required, you will be trained on everything regarding my care.
Must be extremely responsible, take proper precautions, and treat covid seriously. Masking if unvaccinated and hand washing/sanitizer are mandatory. My disability puts me in higher risk of complications and death.
There are 50 hours per week available.
Hours opening up are:
15 on Saturday and 15 on Sunday,
5 hours Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.
Days can possibly be rearranged.
Job responsibilities include:
Bowel care
Bathing and oral care
Dressing
Helping me get in/out of bed
Range of motion/stretching
Preparing meals
Cooking meals
Helping me eat
Housekeeping (Vacuuming, carpet shampooing, cleaning counters and bathroom, washing dishes)
Laundry (washing, folding, and putting away clothes)
Running errands
Filling out the form below can expedite the interview process. Please answer the following questions as completely and as accurately as possible:
https://forms.gle/prniE6CZ8aH2DvxZA
Tyler Coombs

09/03/2021
The Neurodivergent Peer Club will be meeting up to play disc golf this Sunday, September 5th at 11:00 am at the Fort Lew...
09/01/2021

The Neurodivergent Peer Club will be meeting up to play disc golf this Sunday, September 5th at 11:00 am at the Fort Lewis Disc Golf Course! This event is free and open to anybody who's interested in joining 🥏

Photo ID: an assortment of colorful frisbees.

The Neurodivergent Peer Club will be meeting up to play disc golf this Sunday, September 5th at 11:00 am at the Fort Lewis Disc Golf Course! This event is free and open to anybody who's interested in joining 🥏

Photo ID: an assortment of colorful frisbees.

09/01/2021
www.nationalcoreindicators.org

INPUT NEEDED: HCBS QUALITY MEASURES
Bottom Line: The National Quality Forum (NQF) is seeking input on 14 quality measures for home- and community-based services (HCBS). These measures are a subset of the National Core Indicators for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities HCBS Measures.https://www.nationalcoreindicators.org/upload/aidd/NCI_IDD_Indicators_FINAL_21-22.pdf

The measures, and the assessment of them by the NQF’s Patient Experience and Function Standing Committee, can be reviewed in the committee’s draft report. Comments may be submitted through the NQF website at https://auth.qualityforum.org/idsrv/Account/Login?ReturnUrl=%2Fidsrv%2Fconnect%2Fauthorize%2Fcallback%3Fclient_id%3DNQF_Public_Website%26redirect_uri%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fauth.qualityforum.org%252Fnqfredirect%252Fsignin-oidc%26response_type%3Did_token%26scope%3Dopenid%2520profile%2520extranet_identity_resources%2520extranet_profile%26response_mode%3Dform_post%26nonce%3D637661295844118535.MjkzZDVkZDItNzZiYS00ZDFmLWIxYjktNTk4Njk1OWRhNTBkMmYzYjUyODctNWZiOS00ZWQxLTk0NjgtY2ZlZmVkMTAyY2Zk%26state%3DCfDJ8KQYQsO4ND5LlAKgUXUOxm8PeCmJ4v2uxZ45rprh1c_0lROSUIWB-4eFPszVoMkCXN742uQEsiqYKb8I7NArFgrZER8mVpOp4R7-pnBFh_Z7nrh7x39hdIt_qEi9vssRZQgFrgSJ6SgClE1hm2OxwaAuIseslOZ-CthINkY78JOirb-TzAaZWdotJMwmjbAg0L8tBHMB6DvO46Z0vsfjcI5TJM6KMd-OE4mY9ZoMX3zNDwEpxzcFlHtfkkc7jzZAfyX5OsJdDUkeNnJRapcM-IN60sVQaG3lizdSfj0AS_qiFAS6PjI08k2vz3EyONIOCcmwN0o7fv3hxRpMNSQPln_rJ3vLbbdIuhcQsKfI7X55wdVShl0w-FkkLoSWgSkJSNuHf8z9tb59FElyZ_tvUsNal618DpKmb4asjjdTnINSxMWU1ZKzTz84zGyyFLZzhci4jrpT7rvgpIZNsbJ8LsTCMvMva1r_ao3S7NXk_hieCh7L255hVD-BTtdVWI0nE8qImG3avsH2pYltu_jitC5m5HXIjqqxaGdFxzgzJbKkFaSqgxS3e36KJzpcpj3nMV-8aJaPJWYV8hwC-ArFQjU%26x-client-SKU%3DID_NETSTANDARD2_0%26x-client-ver%3D5.5.0.0 (requires registration) until Friday, September 17 at 6:00 PM ET. Any aspect of the report can be commented on including the scope of the measures, the quality of the measure development process, the importance of the measures, their utility in HCBS programs, etc.

Why this is important: Development of standardized measures of quality for HCBS has lagged behind development of similar measures for health care. That has hamstrung efforts to assess and improve the quality (and consistency of quality across states) of the services that make community living possible.

NQF endorsement is an independent validation of a measure of quality. It reflects scientific and evidence-based review, input from consumers and their families, and the perspectives of people throughout the health care and HCBS industries. That’s why input from the aging and disability networks, and of older adults and people with disabilities is so important.

Read More
The National Core Indicators for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities HCBS Measures (NCI) are standard measures used across states to assess the outcomes of services provided to individuals and families. Developed as a collaborative effort between the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services (NASDDDS) and the Human Services Research Institute (HSRI), the indicators address key areas of concern including employment, rights, service planning, community inclusion, choice, and health and safety.

The 14 NCI measures recommended for NQF endorsement collectively comprise NQF Measure #3622. They are spread across four of NQF’s 11 HCBS domains, and are as follows:

Person-Centered Planning (P*P) and Coordination

#P*P-1 The proportion of people who express they want a job who have a related goal in their service plan (Community Job Goal)
#P*P-2 The proportion of people who report their service plan includes things that are important to them (Person-Centered Goals)
#P*P-3 The proportion of people who express they want to increase independence in functional skills (activities of daily living [ADLs]) who have a related goal in their service plan (ADL Goal)
#P*P-4 The proportion of people who report they are supported to learn new things (Lifelong Learning)
#P*P-5 The proportion of people who report satisfaction with the level of participation in community inclusion activities (Satisfaction With Community Inclusion Scale)
Community Inclusion

#CI-1 The proportion of people who reported that they do not feel lonely often (Social Connectedness)
#CI-2 The proportion of people who reported that they have friends who are not staff or family members (Has Friends)
#CI-3 The proportion of people who report adequate transportation (Transportation Availability Scale)
#CI-4 The proportion of people who engage in activities outside the home (Community Inclusion Scale)
Choice and Control

#CC-1 The proportion of people who reported they chose or were aware they could request to change their staff (Chose Staff)
#CC-2 The proportion of people who reported they could change their case manager/service coordinator (Can Change Case Manager)
#CC-3 The proportion of people who live with others who report they can stay home if they choose when others in their house/home go somewhere (Can Stay Home When Others Leave)
#CC-4 The proportion of people who report making choices (independently or with help) in life decisions (Life Decisions Scale)
Human and Legal Rights

#HLR-1 The proportion of people who report that their personal space is respected in the home (Respect for Personal Space Scale)
The Patient Experience and Function Standing Committee will convene on Friday, October 15 from 2:00 - 5:00 PM ET to review and adjudicate comments.

Address

3473 Main Ave, Ste 23
Durango, CO
81301

General information

We believe that people with disabilities know more about what we need than does the government, and that we can direct our supports and our lives more effectively and efficiently than professional service provider agencies. We are dedicated to helping each other lead better lives and taking charge of our own lives with support from each other. We are about building the disability community and developing opportunities to learn, get involved, make social change and have fun. We believe in an inclusive community because improving things for one segment of the population enriches everyone’s lives.

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(970) 259-1672

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Our Core Values:

• Cross disability… All disabilities and ages are included.

• Consumer control… Make your own choices, and be in charge of your own life and supports.

• Respect… People can be respected included members of their communities

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Comments

Website and page looks awesome!
"For those who want to perform their civic duty in person, Darla Stuart, executive director for with the group Think+Change, is encouraging election judges, poll watchers and volunteers to put plans in place now to support a wide range of disabilities. "This could be people who are deaf, hard of hearing, individuals that are blind or visually impaired, folks who use service animals," Stuart said. "So it's really not just one size fits all, it's not like 'I put a ramp in front of the voting site and I'm good to go.'"
Deluxe tilting wheelchair never used. Reasonable price. Call or text for details. 970,403-6312
The COVID-19 pandemic is bringing real and significant disruptions to our lives, our communities, and our organizing. The scale of this shift in our social fabric is new, but these are questions that disability justice organizers have been grappling with for years. How can we organize in a state of constant uncertainty and limitations on physical movement? How can we protect people with compromised immune systems as we work to build people power? How do we get the work done while leaving no one behind? This episode of the Irresistible Movements podcast shares stories and insights from disability justice organizers that all of us can learn from and apply to organizing in our current conditions.
My husband is in a wheelchair. SCIL provided the lumber for a ramp over 20 years ago. It needs replaced. How do we go about getting help to finance a new ramp or at least get plans to build by? Vickie Gundrum
Happy to support your good work with a year-end gift. You can donate too!
Very, Very Important! Call your Senators and urge them to take a NO position on the Graham Cassidy Plan! This plan includes a conversion of Medicaid funding to a per capita cap, which freezes Federal funding for Medicaid. This funding freeze will be felt most by the disabled and aging communities who use Medicaid Services to live in their communities. Cory Gardner's number is 202-224-5941, Michael Bennet is 202-224-5852. Call today, call tomorrow, keep calling! https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2017/09/18/the-new-gop-health-care-measure-goes-further-than-the-failed-one/?utm_term=.273259aca2e3
Low Vision Services at SWCI! SWCI offers support groups and individual training to help seniors and the general population with low vision and blindness live independently, remain active, and cope with vision loss. SWCI maintains a low-vision lab to demonstrate assistive devices and specialized software at both of our office locations. We can support consumers train to use adaptive technology and help people with in-home safety/security needs Please call our Low Vision Coordinator (Susan Weiss at 970-903-5885 for more Information. Services are available in all counties and are free of charge. Low Vision Services:  Volunteer Readers*  Daily Living & Independent Skills training  Sighted Guide  SMART Brailler machine  Vocational Skills training – computers, keyboarding, resume writing, and job preparation  Peer Counseling, Support Groups*, Recreation*  Advocacy for the Vision Impaired and Blind  Information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)  In-Service Training & Presentations (provided to other service providers)  Exemption Directory Assistance charger  TAP – Telephone Assistance Program
Thanks to all of you who attended our annual picnic! We had a wonderful time! Thanks to all of our donors and staff who worked so hard to make it happened. Until next year and Aloha!!