Dr. Ann Nwabuebo, PT, DPT

Dr. Ann Nwabuebo, PT, DPT Doctor of Physical Therapy. Specializing in pelvic health PT (all genders), pre/post partum rehab, men’s health, chronic pain mgmt, myofascial release.
(6)

Serving Philadelphia, PA.

Studies show that the majority of people lack knowledge of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction.  As a result they don’t know...
09/17/2022

Studies show that the majority of people lack knowledge of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. As a result they don’t know how to identify risk factors. 🤷🏾‍♀️🤔

While pelvic floor training is incredibly effective in treating all types of pelvic floor problems (like pain with s*x, urinary incontinence and constipation).., early detection is 🔑.

The 𝘊𝘰𝘻𝘦𝘢𝘯 𝘗𝘦𝘭𝘷𝘪𝘤 𝘋𝘺𝘴𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘰𝘤𝘰𝘭 is a great tool 🛠👍🏾 I use at community seminars to help people identify if they may have some type of pelvic floor problem.

So if you wondering whether you might have pelvic floor problems, 𝘴𝘤𝘳𝘰𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘻! 🧐

If 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘤𝘬𝘦𝘥 >3 𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦, 𝗽𝗲𝗹𝘃𝗶𝗰 𝗳𝗹𝗼𝗼𝗿 𝗱𝘆𝘀𝗳𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲𝗹𝘆…, but these symptoms are treatable! 😉

So reach out to a pelvic floor therapist to get a comprehensive assessment and get started on an individualized treatment plan.

If you are in the Philadelphia area.., DM me to set up a consult!

Studies show that the majority of people lack knowledge of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction.  As a result they don’t know...
09/17/2022

Studies show that the majority of people lack knowledge of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. As a result they don’t know how to identify risk factors. 🤷🏾‍♀️🤔

While pelvic floor training is incredibly effective in treating all types of pelvic floor problems (like pain with s*x, urinary incontinence and constipation).., early detection is 🔑.

The 𝘊𝘰𝘻𝘦𝘢𝘯 𝘗𝘦𝘭𝘷𝘪𝘤 𝘋𝘺𝘴𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘚𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘰𝘤𝘰𝘭 is a great tool 🛠👍🏾 I use at community seminars to help people identify if they may have some type of pelvic floor problem.

So if you wondering whether you might have pelvic floor problems, 𝘴𝘤𝘳𝘰𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘻! 🧐

If 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘤𝘬𝘦𝘥 >3 𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦, 𝗽𝗲𝗹𝘃𝗶𝗰 𝗳𝗹𝗼𝗼𝗿 𝗱𝘆𝘀𝗳𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲𝗹𝘆…, but these symptoms are treatable! 😉

So reach out to a pelvic floor therapist to get a comprehensive assessment and get started on an individualized treatment plan.
If you are in the Philadelphia area.., DM me to set up a consult!

07/10/2022

If you are or know anyone is pregnant or newly postpartum.., you have to check out a project I was involved with called ..
Nike’s (M)ove Like A Mother Program! 💪🏾

It’s the 1st of it’s kind! It’s got …

👉🏾a series of 24 workouts (focused on various stages during pregnancy & postpartum)
👉🏾expert led tutorial videos (including mine 😉)
👉🏾and several editorial articles I contributed to..

…..and it’s all FREE!!!👏🏼🤗🎉

The program lives in in the Nike Training Club app that you can easily download from your App store.

I’m really proud to have been a contributor to the program ☺️along with a stellar team of health care providers and fitness professionals.
🏅

Over the next few posts, I’ll share some highlights .., but first check out the promo video👌🏽

If you are experiencing any discomfort, pain or urinary symptoms with tucking, try these 10 healthy tucking tips to see ...
07/04/2022

If you are experiencing any discomfort, pain or urinary symptoms with tucking, try these 10 healthy tucking tips to see if it helps.

Tucking is a term used to describe the act of flattening the external genitalia for a smoother outward appearance.People...
06/25/2022

Tucking is a term used to describe the act of flattening the external genitalia for a smoother outward appearance.

People tuck to feel more comfortable with their appearance, reduce dysphoria or affirm their gender 🥰❤️🌈🏳️‍⚧️

Tucking may be mildly uncomfortable (when you first get started), however it should not be painful or cause any health concerns.

Common side effects can include chronic urinary tract infections or problems urinating due to the placement and compression of the urethra (where p*e comes out) close to the a**s. Prolonged tucking can also lead to symptoms like prostatitis or cystitis from the increased pressure on the tissues around the external ge****ls. As the pelvic floor muscles guard in response to the tissues being irritated around them…, pelvic floor dysfunction or chronic pelvic pain can result😣.

Affirming pelvic health therapists 🌈❤️can help treat these different concerns by finding techniques to allow affirmative practices while decreasing the unwanted side effects.

In the next post, let’s go through some simple self care tips I give my patients to try.

Reinforcing healthy chest binding practices allows my clients and patients to have less health complications in the long...
06/11/2022

Reinforcing healthy chest binding practices allows my clients and patients to have less health complications in the long run.

Here are 10 helpful binding tips to consider when binding👍🏾…

✔️Try to take your binder off as much as possible during times where it’s less important to bind. Also consider taking a few days off from binding.

✔️ Take your binder off before you sleep. Give your body rest while you rest. 😴💤🛏

✔️ Work out using a less compressive garment. 🏋🏽‍♂️Sports bras are designed to move with you as you workout, while a binder can make movement and even breathing more difficult. So consider wearing a sports bra with a baggy shirt, or a binder that is a size larger.

✔️ Ideally, wear a binder that is commercially made that has a chest compressing fabric.

✔️Be sure to use the sizing guidelines to find your ideal size.

✔️Avoid use of duct tape, saran wrap or ace bandages to bind your chest. Ace bandages in particular are designed to constrict, 😣so as you breathe, they get tighter which can hurt.

✔️ Stay hydrated!💦💧

✔️ Stretch your chest, ribcage and back and work on breathing 😮‍💨🫁and postural re-education anytime you are out of your binder.

✔️ Keep your binder clean, and be sure to first check with your binder manufacturer’s website to see if they have recommendations for how best to wash your specific garment. 🧺🧽🧼

✔️If you are feeling any nagging pain , don’t ignore it. Stop binding 🚫 for some time and ask for help from your health care team.

REFERENCES: healthybinding.com, pointofpride.org

Chest binding is the use of compression garments to make one’s chest appear flatter.  This can be a significantly affirm...
06/08/2022

Chest binding is the use of compression garments to make one’s chest appear flatter. This can be a significantly affirming practice particularly for trans and non-binary people❤️🌈

Other benefits were noted in a study published in the medical journal Culture, Health & Sexuality included;
✔️ Increased self-esteem
✔️ Minimized gender dysphoria — a conflict between a person’s physical gender and the gender with which they identify
✔️ Decreased anxiety and depression and
✔️ Improved sense of autonomous control of the body

The downside of binding is it can also be associated with chronic pain and postural problems. In a 2017 study that included 1800 people who bind; 97% reported experiencing 1 negative health outcome associated with binding like back pain, overheating, chest pain and shortness of breath. 82% of them also believed it was important to have a conversation with their health care provider 👩🏾‍⚕️about their binding habits.

People who bind shouldn’t feel like they have to choose between feeling confident in their own bodies and physical pain or discomfort. 😔

This is where gender affirming PT/ OT can help! 😊🙆🏾‍♀️Treatment options can include:

🔅 Exercises to improve mobility of the ribcage, spine & shoulders
🔅 Breathing & relaxation exercises
🔅 Strength training: core & upper back muscles
🔅 Education on safe binding practices

In the next post let’s get it into some specific exercises👍🏾

According to the Center for American Progress (CAP), nearly 50%of transgender people — and 68%of transgender people of c...
06/07/2022

According to the Center for American Progress (CAP), nearly 50%of transgender people — and 68%of transgender people of color — reported having experienced mistreatment by a medical provider, including being refused care.🚫

Societal stigmas, discrimination (and other factors) prevent trans & gender diverse people from seeking necessary medical care with 28% reporting having postponed or not gotten necessary medical care for fear of mistreatment.

These barriers make it hard to be open and honest with a provider—and as we celebrate Pride 🌈this month (and every month) - highlighting the specific needs of the LGBTQIA+ community is so needed.

As a PT serving this community, those unique needs can include (but not limited to):
🔅Tissue preparation Pre-Gender affirming surgery
🔅Post gender affirming surgery rehab
🔅Pain from surgical scars
🔅Pain or difficulty with vaginal pe*******on
🔅Inability to achieve vaginal pe*******on
🔅Difficulty or inability to achieve or**sm
🔅Urinary problems including incontinence
🔅Pain or postural problems associated with chest binding
🔆Pain associated with tucking or packing
🔅Pelvic pain
🔅Pudendal Neuralgia (pelvic nerve pain)
🔅Constipation

Let’s talk about some of these topics over the next several posts and how patient-centered, affirming and evidence-based PT can significantly help. 🤲🏾

I’m so excited to share that I sat down with  to speak on the   the pelvic floor. 🤗I got the chance to share my own pelv...
04/07/2022

I’m so excited to share that I sat down with to speak on the the pelvic floor. 🤗

I got the chance to share my own pelvic floor journey and to educate athletes and people who are pre- and postpartum on how to be mindful of and proactive about their pelvic floor.

My hope is that together we can reduce the stigma around pelvic floor dysfunctions. Thank you again to the Nike trained podcast team for inviting me ❤️

Hope you enjoy ii! 👍🏾Link in bio ⬆️

This week I worked with a high school basketball player, a triathlete, a competitive weight lifter, a dancer and a socce...
03/03/2022

This week I worked with a high school basketball player, a triathlete, a competitive weight lifter, a dancer and a soccer player. Athletes across ages and genders but one thing in common - their pelvic pain has sidelined them from returning to their sport of choice 😞

Just like any other injury to the body, creating an effective pelvic pain rehab plan to return you back to the sport that brings you joy should be a priority.

Working through these 3 key rehab phases really helps my patients feel focused on the plan towards their goals. So I hope you find this helpful.

🪜🔆STAGE 1: Reduce pain and Improve mobility
This can include manual (hands-on therapy) in and around the pelvic floor/ spine/ abdomen etc; breathing exercises; mobility/ stretching exercises; alignment and postural re-education work.

Goal: Improve blood flow, calm down the nervous system, relax and gently stretch those stiffened pelvic floor muscles and the muscles that surround it.

🪜🔆STAGE 2: Strength train
Work on lengthening AND strengthening the muscles around the spine, pelvis, legs. Add some resistance with body weight, dumbbells/ kettlebells or resistance bands.

Goal: Change how the nervous system responds to those muscles contracting and relaxing. Start to incorporate modifications of your sport of choice e.g do some weightlifting at 25-50% of where you were when you were at your best etc

🪜🔆STAGE 3: Challenge your body!
Start to add more load i.e heavier weights or resistance. Add more reps, more impact. Use the principles you learned from Stage 1 and apply them here while you train. Stick with the general rule of thumb and limit your increase in resistance work (eg dumbbell training) to 10% at a time. Take 1-2 days to recover and monitor how your pelvic floor responds after each progressively harder routine.

Goal: To steadily, safely and mindfully challenge your body with heavier resistance exercise, until you are back to the sport you love.

Contd in comments …

The vagus nerve is the main parasympathetic nerve of the body.  When we feel calm, the vagus nerve keeps out heart rate ...
02/27/2022

The vagus nerve is the main parasympathetic nerve of the body. When we feel calm, the vagus nerve keeps out heart rate down and digestive system working. It runs from the neck, through the chest and down into the digestive tract.

When we are stressed or anxious (and feeling more of those chronic pelvic pain symptoms) pain😖this nerve works hard to try and calm things down. 😊

Here are some simple tips to try and help it out.

🔅Sing or read out loud: The vibration from the vocalization helps stimulate the vagus nerve. You can also take long, slow exhalations making “hmmm” or “om” sounds.

🔅Ear pulls: 👂 This provides indirect input input to your nervous system to create a calming response. This can also be helpful if you have tension headaches or TMJ.

🔅Laugh out Loud: 😂 Our nervous system doesn’t know the difference between real and fake laughter. They both have the same effect of helping us feel happier and more relaxed.

🔅Diaphragmatic breathing: 😮‍💨Find a comfortable position. Inhale for 2 secs and exhale for 4 secs. Repeat for 2 mins.

🔅Yawn: 🥱Do this from time to time voluntarily. This will help your body feel calmer.

🔅Be conscious of your diet: 🥕Limiting foods like artificial sugar, processed foods and dairy ❌ can help reduce gut inflammation and bloating and relieve some of the pressure around the vagus nerve.

Super grateful to partner with Maisonette] in supporting our prenatal/ postpartum community. Be sure to check them out a...
02/16/2022

Super grateful to partner with Maisonette] in supporting our prenatal/ postpartum community. Be sure to check them out along with my recent blog post:)

Repost from Maisonette]

Are you trying to figure out what is and isn’t normal for your pelvic health after childbirth? Pelvic Health Specialist, Dr. Ann Nwabuebo of , offers insights on key things every postpartum parent should know about their pelvic health now on Le Scoop at the link in bio.

Illustration by

Filled with gratitude 🙏🏾 for clients who allow me the opportunity to walk with them for a part of their healing journey....
01/18/2022

Filled with gratitude 🙏🏾 for clients who allow me the opportunity to walk with them for a part of their healing journey. 🙏🏾❤️✨

01/03/2022

Happy New Year friends 🎊🎆🎈 May the new year bless you with joy, health, and so much happiness. 🎉🎊❤️

So I did a thing!.. 😉Just published  !  “Each Woman’s Menopause: An Evidence Based Resource”Really proud to have joined ...
12/13/2021

So I did a thing!.. 😉

Just published !

“Each Woman’s Menopause: An Evidence Based Resource”

Really proud to have joined a team of incredible clinicians and Lucia Miller, MPT,WCS to co-author a chapter that covers an interdisciplinary approach in treating symptoms associated with menopause.

This book offers a diverse world 🌎 picture on menopause using global data about this important life transition.

Writing my chapter, I thought a lot about my mother, her experience and cultural expectations 🇳🇬 while going through “the change”.

I wondered how different her experience would have been had she received the medical guidance the way this resource offers it. My hope is that the international reach of this book will offer that to many others.

So grateful to our editor for doing me the honor in allowing me to be a part of this amazing project. 🙏🏾❤️🥰

Scroll through to check out one of my favorite excerpts from the book’s preface.

11/06/2021
It was really awesome getting interviewed as a member of the MossRehab (Tabor Road) Philadelphia team.  Check out the ar...
11/05/2021

It was really awesome getting interviewed as a member of the MossRehab (Tabor Road) Philadelphia team. Check out the article 😉

10/28/2021

These are devices I recommend to my patients on a daily basis. Accessibility to them is what allows them to progress so much farther and faster in their care. Please show some support and sign the petition today.🙏🏾

🔅Don’t think. Just run!🔅This was her affirmation going into her 1st race.Less than a week ago I got this lovely text fro...
10/20/2021

🔅Don’t think. Just run!🔅

This was her affirmation going into her 1st race.

Less than a week ago I got this lovely text from an old patient of mine. It’s been a year since our last session. Her hip pain plus a global pandemic had side lined her from running her first marathon 2 yrs ago. After we worked together for a few months, I moved, but we checked in periodically as she continued working with a new PT.

She finally ran her race to celebrate her 5th decade of life and absolutely crushed it!! 🏃‍♀️ 🥇 So honored to have played a role in her healing.

Gentle reminder .. no matter what your race is..don’t give up ❤️

As the World honors today as World Mental Health Day.., it’s worth acknowledging that people with chronic pelvic pain (C...
10/10/2021

As the World honors today as World Mental Health Day.., it’s worth acknowledging that people with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) suffer from mental health conditions at a much higher rate compared to their p*ers.

A 2019 study showed that 50% of cisgendered women with CPP had moderate to severe anxiety and more than 25% had moderate to severe depression. Other studies have shown that men and p***s owners with CPP have a higher prevalence of anxiety/panic disorder/symptoms that those without CPP.

If you are a CPP sufferer, you are not alone. Your health care providers must acknowledge and support your mental health and wellness, no matter what their specialty might be. Caring for your mind and body go hand in hand in finding long term solutions in your healing journey.✨✨

Conditions that can cause Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP) can come from the reproductive organs, bladder, bowels, the pelvic v...
10/10/2021

Conditions that can cause Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP) can come from the reproductive organs, bladder, bowels, the pelvic veins, nerves and the muscles/ joints around the spine and pelvis. Examples are…

⛔️ Menstrual cramps
⛔️ Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome
⛔️ Nonbacterial protatitis
⛔️ Pudendal nerve entrapment
⛔️ Testicular torsion
⛔️ Endometriosis
⛔️ Post vasectomy pain
⛔️ Uterine fibroids
⛔️ Pelvic inflammatory disease
⛔️ Irritable Bowel Syndrome
⛔️ Diverticulitis
⛔️ Low back and hip pain
⛔️ Fibromyalgia
⛔️ Pelvic surgery/ Injury
etc

With different specialists involved to find the primary driver of the pain (like a gynecologist, urologist, pain management specialist, colore**al doctor, gastroenterologist 👩🏾‍⚕️ etc).., what tends to stay consistent across these diagnoses is the state of the pelvic floor muscles, the surrounding tissues AND the nervous system 🧠 . Everything ends up working really hard 😣😖😩 to protect you which in turn causes a vicious cycle of pain.

This is where having a pelvic floor PT involved in your care is key. Learning tips and tricks on how to reduce this tension to break this cycle can give long term solutions with holistic healing.

A diagnosis of Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP) is made after 3-6 months of pelvic pain (i.e the lower abdomen, p***s, testicle...
09/26/2021

A diagnosis of Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP) is made after 3-6 months of pelvic pain (i.e the lower abdomen, p***s, testicles, v***a, re**um, perineum etc).

Diagnosing and treating CPP can be very tricky 🤔as the causes could stem from the bladder, the reproductive organs, the gastrointestinal system, or the nerves/ muscles of the spine, pelvis and the abdomen.

An estimated 50% of cases of CPP remain undiagnosed and it can 5-7 yrs for someone to be diagnosed. This delay can be for a variety of reasons..

⛔️ Imaging and lab findings are typically inconclusive.
⛔️ CPP is a diagnosis made by ruling out others. So the process can take time.
⛔️ Inadequate care from getting misdiagnosed.
⛔️ The sensitivity and cultural taboo of discussing topics related to pelvic pain.

Over the next few posts let's talk about the different types of CPP, their causes and considerations to make when treating it.

🔆 Patient Overview:My patient was a 35 yr old, self referred to me.  They had pelvic surgery over 6 wks ago after a recu...
09/02/2021

🔆 Patient Overview:

My patient was a 35 yr old, self referred to me.  They had pelvic surgery over 6 wks ago after a recurrence of ovarian cancer, and they were experiencing severe pelvic pain. Bowel movements, sitting or standing for any length of time resulted in days of debilitating pelvic pain.  They were open about their underlying diagnosis of medical PTSD, and their ongoing work with mental health providers.  

 🔆 Initial Examination:

* They relied on the use of a wheelchair and a friend to help them get around
* Standing posture was hunched forward and in a guarded position due to the pain
* Very restricted and painful abdominal scars from prior surgeries and procedures
* Internal pelvic floor muscle evaluation wasn’t appropriate considering the severity of their symptoms.

🔆 Treatment:

* PT 1x/wk with a focus initially on relaxation based work, breath and visualization work.
* Gentle hands on work (craniosacral therapy, myofascial release, myofascial unwinding, visceral manipulation) was slowly introduced with lots of patient education to ensure ongoing informed consent.
* Consistent communication with their primary care physician/ oncologist was maintained to explore pain mgmt options that would give more localized pelvic pain relief.
* Consistent communication with their mental health provider to help with the processing of emotional releases during/ after various sessions.
* After 4 months of PT, consent was provided for external pelvic work only.  
* After 8 months, consent was provided for gentle internal re**al work only. 

🔆 Outcome
After weekly apts for 1 yr, the patient was able to walk without any kind of assistive device.  They had significantly cut down on their pain medication, pain with bowel movements had decreased and they started swimming anywhere from 3-5x/wk as part of their self care routine.

This patient worked, and continues to work through a lot of trauma ❤️‍🩹. What I will always remember about them though is the majestic unraveling as they found that beautiful reconnection with their body. ✨✨❤️

It was one of the greatest honors of my career to work with this human.🙏🏾❤️

🔆 Patient Overview:My patient was a 35 yr old, self referred to me.  They had pelvic surgery over 6 wks ago after a recu...
09/02/2021

🔆 Patient Overview:

My patient was a 35 yr old, self referred to me.  They had pelvic surgery over 6 wks ago after a recurrence of ovarian cancer, and they were experiencing severe pelvic pain. Bowel movements, sitting or standing for any length of time resulted in days of debilitating pelvic pain.  They were open about their underlying diagnosis of medical PTSD, and their ongoing work with mental health providers.  

 🔆 Initial Examination:

* They relied on the use of a wheelchair and a friend to help them get around
* Standing posture was hunched forward and in a guarded position due to the pain
* Very restricted and painful abdominal scars from prior surgeries and procedures
* Internal pelvic floor muscle evaluation wasn’t appropriate considering the severity of their symptoms.

🔆 Treatment:

* PT 1x/wk with a focus initially on relaxation based work, breath and visualization work.
* Gentle hands on work (craniosacral therapy, myofascial release, myofascial unwinding, visceral manipulation) was slowly introduced with lots of patient education to ensure ongoing informed consent.
* Consistent communication with their primary care physician/ oncologist was maintained to explore pain mgmt options that would give more localized pelvic pain relief.
* Consistent communication with their mental health provider to help with the processing of emotional releases during/ after various sessions.
* After 4 months of PT, consent was provided for external pelvic work only.  
* After 8 months, consent was provided for gentle internal re**al work only. 
(Contd in comments)

Not all PT’s/ Rehab professionals are able to offer trauma informed care.  As you prepare to work with one.., or you loo...
09/01/2021

Not all PT’s/ Rehab professionals are able to offer trauma informed care. As you prepare to work with one.., or you look to find the right fit.., here are a few tips to consider.

🔆 Interview potential providers.
There’s value in seeking out the right provider to work with. Most providers offer brief introductory calls where they can give you a general sense of their approach in working with folks with a history of trauma.

🔆 Consider investing in your health.
Making that out of pocket financial investment in your health, can be a really tough decision to make. To widen your options, consider looking outside of your insurance network plan.

🔆Ask for payment flexibility
The worst thing they could say is no. 🤷🏾‍♀️ if you find an out of network provider that feels like the right fit …., ask if they offer a sliding scale or a package that accommodates your budget. The typical recommendation I make working with clients is to frontload the sessions and taper off the frequency of visits as they transition to self-care work.

🔆Find support
1-on-1 mental health services, trusted friends and family or reputable support groups. Stay connected with people that can surround you with hope while you go through this work.

Not all PT’s/ Rehab professionals are able to offer trauma informed care.  As you prepare to work with one.., or you loo...
09/01/2021

Not all PT’s/ Rehab professionals are able to offer trauma informed care. As you prepare to work with one.., or you look to find the right fit.., here are a few tips to consider.

🔆 Interview potential providers.
There’s value in seeking out the right provider to work with. Most providers offer brief introductory calls where they can give you a general sense of their approach in working with folks with a history of trauma.

🔆 Consider investing in your health.
Making that out of pocket financial investment in your health, can be a really tough decision to make. To widen your options, consider looking outside of your insurance network plan.

🔆Ask about payment flexibility
The worst the provider could say is no. 🤷🏾‍♀️ if you find an out of network provider that feels like the right fit …., ask if they offer a sliding scale or a package that accommodates your budget.

🔆Find support
1-on-1 mental health services, trusted friends and family or reputable support groups. Stay connected with people that can surround you with hope while you go through this work.

This was part of a beautiful note ❤️ that an old patient shared with me recently that speaks to the heart of what trauma...
08/27/2021

This was part of a beautiful note ❤️ that an old patient shared with me recently that speaks to the heart of what trauma informed care from a PT or rehab professional can look like.

This care cannot take the place of working with a mental health provider.

However, what we can be, is an important part of your health care ‘team’ giving you safe, compassionate care ✨to heal those connections between your body, mind and spirit.

There are tons of great books out there that help us understand more about how trauma affects the body.  Others that exp...
08/24/2021

There are tons of great books out there that help us understand more about how trauma affects the body. Others that explain why pain can persist long after the trauma has gone, and some that share powerful individual stories of healing trauma.

Here are some of my favorites:

🔆 The Body Keeps the Score by Dr. Bessel van der Kolk
🔆 The Body Remembers by Babette Rothschild.
🔆 What’s in Your Web? By Phil Tavolacci (I wrote a chapter in this book so I’m slightly biased 😜)
🔆 Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma by Peter Levine
🔆 The Trauma Spectrum, by Robert Scaer
🔆 The Body Bears the Burden, by Robert Scaer
🔆 Healing Ancient Wounds by John Barnes
🔆 🔆 Explain Pain by David Butler, Lorimer Moseley
🔆 Why Pelvic Pain Hurts - Neuroscience Education for Patients with Pelvic Pain by Adriaan Louw, Sandra Hilton & Carolyn Vandyken

What are some of yours ? 🤓

When it comes to self healing a body that has experienced trauma, reintroducing movement (of any kind) OR rehab that inc...
08/18/2021

When it comes to self healing a body that has experienced trauma, reintroducing movement (of any kind) OR rehab that includes touch…, might be scary.

Where do you start? What if it hurts? How do you process the emotions if they come up? 😫

A trauma-informed PT/OT (or rehab specialist) can be an excellent guide. However, if you are not ready or unable to work with one.., here are a few things that you can keep in mind. 💡

🔆1. Choose a physical space that feels safe
Is it your bedroom or out in nature? Wherever it is, be intentional about setting some time to do a simple movement routine there.

🔆2. Choose movement that will bring you joy!
When your movement practice brings you joy, there is a greater chance that it can become a more consistent part of your routine.

🔆3. Feel safe with how you position your body:
It could be as simple as lying on your back or on your side to do some gentle movement. All options are available, even if you need to make transitions midway.

🔆4. Move another body part, if one hurts too much:
If you experience pelvic pain (as an example) and it feels too intense to move it…, then move other body parts. The mobility work can carry over to the painful parts of you, as you ultimately work towards regaining mobility throughout your body.

🔆5. Feel safe in how much or how little you choose to move:
The range of motion that you move your body in should not be forced. Let it be easy, and you will find that with time you can nudge things a little more.

As I’ve worked with patients and clients over the years move through this initial phase of re-introducing early movement, we discuss the possibility of emotions coming up to the surface. This can be incredibly healing as the mind, body and spirit communicate to heal trauma. ✨ I always encourage my patients and clients to get the support of a mental health provider to help process these emotions. If this comes up for you, know that you are not alone.

“Just breathe!”  🧘🏾‍♀️ Sounds so easy right?   When it comes to re-introducing movement into a body that has experienced...
08/15/2021

“Just breathe!” 🧘🏾‍♀️ Sounds so easy right? When it comes to re-introducing movement into a body that has experienced trauma, being very intentional about calming down the nervous system is where it starts. When faced with danger, that ‘fight, flight or freeze response’ describes our natural impulse to defend ourselves or run until it’s safe 😣. The challenge is that when you are experiencing persistent pain of any kind, that nervous system impulse is still heightened and the tension in the tissues remains.

Retraining ourselves on how to breath efficiently is the very first step in quietening down the nervous system, reconnecting with our body and reintroducing movement that feels gentle and safe.

There are many variations of breathing exercises, but this is a simple routine you can try:

🔆Find a space and position that feels comfortable to you.
🔆 Place a hand on your abdomen or lower ribs and the other on your chest.
🔆 Inhale for a count of 4, and let your abdomen/ lower ribs expand.
🔆 Exhale for a count of 4 and let your abdomen relax back down.
🔆 Repeat for 6-8 reps

If you notice a lot of movement in your chest with your breath, try to redirect that to your other hand.

Do you have any go-to breathwork routines that help to calm down your nervous system?

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