Little Bellies Lactation Services, LLC

Little Bellies Lactation Services, LLC Breastfeeding support
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Operating as usual

Have you registered for the Virtual Big Latch On?  This is a fun event to celebrate breastfeeding!  Join us on August 6 ...
07/29/2021
Big Latch On

Have you registered for the Virtual Big Latch On? This is a fun event to celebrate breastfeeding! Join us on August 6 at 10am for raffles/drawings and some breastfeeding trivia. Then, at 10:30 am, everyone latches their baby and we count the latches. We submit this number to the Global Big Latch On in hopes of breaking new latch count records!

Email [email protected] to register. All breastfeeding families are welcome!

https://www.beebehealthcare.org/calendar/virtual-events/big-latch

Join us for Big Latch On! Visit our website for event details or to request information.

August is World Breastfeeding Month! This free virtual event is open to ALL breastfeeding moms!  There will be Breastfee...
07/08/2021
Big Latch On

August is World Breastfeeding Month! This free virtual event is open to ALL breastfeeding moms! There will be Breastfeeding trivia, a drawing for a basket full of breastfeeding accessories and a free gift for the first 50 people who log on the day of the event! Registration is open!

https://www.beebehealthcare.org/calendar/virtual-events/big-latch

Join us for Big Latch On! Visit our website for event details or to request information.

What a great opportunity!
06/11/2021

What a great opportunity!

I am excited to announce that thanks to funding from the WVDHHR Office of Nutrition Services, we have made the WV Outpatient Breastfeeding Champion Training FREE!! (Normally $225 per person) We have 24 paid seats remaining and it's first come first serve!!
The 16 hour course is June 22, 23, 29, 30 8am-12pm. Participants can earn the OBC certificate by doing a combination of viewing the live online and recorded sessions.
**PLEASE NOTE** this course is only for those that work with West Virginia nursing mothers and babies. And, since seats are limited, we are giving preference to those that work in the Outpatient/Community setting and who do not already have a lactation certification.
If you work in an inpatient setting or are looking for LCERPs, we are glad to put you on a waiting list and include you if space allows!
OR you can pay a reduced rate of $100 for a seat in this training!
***Not to worry WVBA plans to continue offer free or low cost training for everyone no matter where you work or your level of expertise! STAY TUNED
To register, EMAIL me @[email protected] and answer the following questions:
Do you currently work with WV nursing mothers and infants?
Where do you work? Company name & type of setting (ie; physician office, health department, WIC, home visitor)
Do you have a lactation certification? If so, which one? (CLC, CLS, WBPC, CBS, IBCLC etc)

Don’t be afraid to bring baby close!  Its important to get a deep latch to prevent ni**le damage and reduce gas/reflux r...
05/02/2021

Don’t be afraid to bring baby close! Its important to get a deep latch to prevent ni**le damage and reduce gas/reflux resulting from baby taking in too much air during the feeding.

How do you choose a lactation consultant?You baby latches great in the hospital but what happens if things are not going...
04/13/2021

How do you choose a lactation consultant?

You baby latches great in the hospital but what happens if things are not going so smoothly with breastfeeding when you get home?

There may be several lactation consultants in your area, but how do you choose? Listed below are some things to consider when making your decision.

1. Board-Certified. The IBCLC is a healthcare professional who specializes in the clinical management of breastfeeding and has passed the certification exam. They follow professional standards and adhere to a code of conduct. They keep current in their skills with required continuing education and recertification is required every 5 years. This article by Diana West summarizes some of the differences in lactation support https://dianawest.com/ibclc/.

2. Experience. How long have they practiced as a lactation consultant? Where have they practiced? Have they worked with mentors before practicing independently - for how long? If they work in a hospital, how much outpatient experience do they have? How do they keep current on skills and knowledge? Ask if they specialize in a particular area of lactation.

3. Availability. Is this their primary job or are they working in another role most of the time? Can they see you quickly if needed? Do they carry a “warm line” for you to reach them by phone or text? Do they offer telehealth as an option and what HIPAA compliant platform do they use for this service?

4. Reputation. Reach out to your friends for references. Check with your local Moms groups too. Look up/verify their credentials online
https://iblce.org/ibclc-credential-verification/

5. Cost. Do your own market comparison. Compare costs with your hospital’s outpatient services, lactation offerings in pediatric offices, and with other private consultants. Do they accept insurance? Are there fees for phone calls? Don’t pay $$$ for inexperience.

6. Personality. This might be one of the most important considerations! Does this person support YOUR breastfeeding goals? Do you feel comfortable with them?

It’s important to choose a knowledgeable consultant that will not only help you with any breastfeeding problems you may experience, but one who will guide and support you and your baby on your beautiful nursing journey.

How do you choose a lactation consultant?

You baby latches great in the hospital but what happens if things are not going so smoothly with breastfeeding when you get home?

There may be several lactation consultants in your area, but how do you choose? Listed below are some things to consider when making your decision.

1. Board-Certified. The IBCLC is a healthcare professional who specializes in the clinical management of breastfeeding and has passed the certification exam. They follow professional standards and adhere to a code of conduct. They keep current in their skills with required continuing education and recertification is required every 5 years. This article by Diana West summarizes some of the differences in lactation support https://dianawest.com/ibclc/.

2. Experience. How long have they practiced as a lactation consultant? Where have they practiced? Have they worked with mentors before practicing independently - for how long? If they work in a hospital, how much outpatient experience do they have? How do they keep current on skills and knowledge? Ask if they specialize in a particular area of lactation.

3. Availability. Is this their primary job or are they working in another role most of the time? Can they see you quickly if needed? Do they carry a “warm line” for you to reach them by phone or text? Do they offer telehealth as an option and what HIPAA compliant platform do they use for this service?

4. Reputation. Reach out to your friends for references. Check with your local Moms groups too. Look up/verify their credentials online
https://iblce.org/ibclc-credential-verification/

5. Cost. Do your own market comparison. Compare costs with your hospital’s outpatient services, lactation offerings in pediatric offices, and with other private consultants. Do they accept insurance? Are there fees for phone calls? Don’t pay $$$ for inexperience.

6. Personality. This might be one of the most important considerations! Does this person support YOUR breastfeeding goals? Do you feel comfortable with them?

It’s important to choose a knowledgeable consultant that will not only help you with any breastfeeding problems you may experience, but one who will guide and support you and your baby on your beautiful nursing journey.

03/31/2021
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Blood in Baby’s Stool

Have you been told by your baby’s pediatrician to eliminate dairy from your diet? And soy? Was your breastfed baby diagnosed with blood in the stool and did the pediatrician immediately blame it on a milk protein allergy?

Time to call an IBCLC for a feeding evaluation!
Oversupply can actually result in baby getting high lactose feedings (too much foremilk) which can result in tummy upset, frothy green explosive stools and irritation to the digestive tract resulting in........drum roll.......trace blood in the stool.

I’m not saying milk protein allergies are non existent; however they are actually not very common. One study shows the incidence of cows milk protein allergy in breastfed infants to be 0.5-1% (Sambrook, 2016). That is a very small number!!!

Hold off on the starvation diet! Get to the bottom of the feeding issue before you give up your ice cream!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5033286/#__ffn_sectitle

Note:  this article has not yet been peer-reviewed. However.....this is pretty amazing information from a small study sh...
03/05/2021
SARS-CoV-2 antibodies detected in human breast milk post-vaccination

Note: this article has not yet been peer-reviewed.

However.....this is pretty amazing information from a small study showing covid antibodies in breast milk just days after moms were vaccinated!

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.23.21252328v1?fbclid=IwAR0svK-i2IjfvGvd5wRHMFWIZNfgiNNDQg5Ce2o_Z2thAWU9AIfJftWd4Pc

Importance The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has infected over a hundred million people worldwide, with almost 2.5 million deaths at the date of this publication. In the United States, Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines were first administered to the public starting in December 2020, and no lactating women....

02/09/2021

The key to understanding breastfeeding is knowing whether the baby is getting milk from the breast or not. This may sound "simplistic", but it is the key! Many people feel more confident about giving bottles because they feel that watching the baby empty the bottle and seeing the number of ounces or mls consumed tells them what they need to know about the baby's milk intake. They worry about not being able to tell whether the baby got breastmilk from the breast directly. But it is easy to tell when watching a baby breastfeeding at the breast. When the baby drinks from the breast, you can see that the baby is receiving milk from the breast. How? By observing the PAUSE in the baby's chin as the baby opens his/her mouth to the widest. Though the baby's jaw may move even without drinking, the baby's chin will only drop down and hold, with a PAUSE, as the baby receives milk. The longer the pause, the more milk the baby received. In these two photos you can see, first how the baby' s chin is at the uppermost position and in the second, how it has dropped down completely. Seeing this with a pause, before the baby closes again, tells you with certainty that the baby has just swallowed a mouthful of milk. And that gives you confidence to breastfeed or seek help with breastfeeding if necessary.
You can find more breastfeeding tips and advice in my eBook:
https://www.amazon.com/Breastfeeding-Empowering-Jack-Newman-FRCPC/dp/1717802842/

Not all ties need revision!!!!  An IBCLC will thoroughly assess tongue movement and suck quality which involves much mor...
01/28/2021

Not all ties need revision!!!! An IBCLC will thoroughly assess tongue movement and suck quality which involves much more than a visual observation. Telehealth is great for some things, but if you’re concerned about a tongue ties, ask for an in- person appointment with an IBCLC.

“Why wasn’t my baby checked for tongue tie after birth?”
This can cause a lot of upset for parents where baby later turns out to have tongue tie, but there are some really sensible reasons why we wait.

Firstly, a tiny newborn hasn’t experienced anything in their mouth yet. If one of their first experiences is a gloved finger poking about then there is a chance baby may decide he doesn’t want anything in his mouth thank you very much… including a breast. This can become even more problematic if we then cut a tie. So, we want to wait a few days for baby to learn it’s nice to have things in his mouth. So he feeds happily.

Secondly, tension in the mouth isn’t always due to a restrictive frenulum. It could be soreness in the head, jaw, or neck from birth. I’ve had really interesting conversations with colleagues fortunate enough to work closely with cranial osteopaths, and they report how sometimes frenotomy can be avoided by a session with the osteo loosening everything up. (I would love to know if there are studies…)

Thirdly, not all frenulums need snipping. Not all tight frenulums need snipping. It can be really easy to blame a tongue tie for pain where actually, studies have told us that about 50% Of the time skilled lactation support alone is enough to get feeds effective and comfy. Frenotomy is a surgical procedure. It may be quick but it does come with the risks of bleeding and breast aversion / feed refusal.

On a similar but slightly off topic note – a tongue tie assessment is NOT someone seeing your baby stick his tongue out. We need to check for several things, which involve a physical examination of the baby’s mouth with a finger.
1. Does the baby have lots of blisters on his lips?
2. Can baby stick tongue at least past the lower gum?
3. Can baby get his tongue at least halfway to the roof of his mouth?
4. Can baby move his tongue from side to side to chase a finger moving along his gum?
5. Can baby cup his tongue when sucking?
6. Does sucking feel like a wave of movement from back to front?
7. Can a frenulum be felt under the tongue?
8. If there is a frenulum, does it seem short, thick, tight, or is it thin and stretchy?
9. Is the palate high, narrow, or unusual?
10. Is baby sucking using the correct muscles or is he hanging on for dear life with his lips? (sometimes described incorrectly as a very strong suck.)

We really, really don’t want to be doing all of this in the first few days.

As always, there are exceptions:

1.Sometimes Baby has a very obvious anterior tie. This is a little different, and may be snipped sooner.

2. Baby causes a lot of damage very quickly to your ni**les and / or is clearly not feeding effectively. (So no meconium, low blood sugar, early onset jaundice etc.)

I’d like to finish with a personal example.
My son Oliver had a tongue tie, and he wasn’t very keen to latch. I was mostly expressing and syringe feeding my colostrum, and I was insistent that I wanted the tie snipped ASAP. Reluctantly the midwife agreed to cut it on day 3.
Oliver didn’t latch again for FOUR MONTHS.
He already had signs of aversion before the frenotomy, but we were getting some latches. The procedure essentially cemented for him that things in his mouth were horrid. If I had been a little patient it’s possible he may have established at breast feeding sooner. When I went on to study for my exam 2yrs later, a lot of what we went through with Oliver began to make sense, and early tongue tie revision before he was happy at the breast was *likely* a part of that.

Address

Leesburg, VA

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 1pm

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I just recently had surgery (Jan. 25) & of course my biggest concern was my new baby & who would care for her. Not knowing anyone in the area since I just moved here didn't give me a very big choice so the only option I was left with was to keep her with me at the hospital & have the person that brought me keep an eye on her. I soon found out tho that I didn't need to worry at all! Ms. Julie took time out of her day & work to come down to check on me & since I was still in the back she decided to pay Lily a little visit! Julie was there to hold her, to comfort her, to feed her, & to cuddle with her while I was unable to! You have know idea how much this put my mind at ease knowing that such a wonderful person was caring for my baby girl when I couldn't be there! I have gotten to know Julie over the last couple of months & this woman is definitely an Angle sent from above! She always makes sure to spend as much time as needed to help me if I have problems or if I just need to talk. I am so blessed to have met this lady!! Thank you Julie for being there for Lily when I couldn't be! You know how concerned I was for her with going into this surgery but my mind is now at ease knowing she was in the best of hands!!
Thank You so much for all your help with Lily!! You have been amazing & I have learned so much through you!