HB Medical & Wellness Care

HB Medical & Wellness Care We are a women's primary care clinic. We offer physicals, paps/gyn exams, pre-operative exams and urgent care visits.
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Operating as usual

Learn the signs of a stroke
05/17/2020

Learn the signs of a stroke

May is National Stroke Awareness MonthEach year in the United States, there are more than 800,000 strokes. Stroke is a l...
05/17/2020
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

Each year in the United States, there are more than 800,000 strokes. Stroke is a leading cause of death in the country and causes more serious long-term disabilities than any other disease. Nearly three-quarters of all strokes occur in people over the age of 65 and the risk of having a stroke more than doubles each decade after the age of 55.

The major risk factors for stroke include:

High blood pressure.
Diabetes.
Heart and blood vessel diseases. ...
High LDL cholesterol levels.
Smoking.
Brain aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). ...
Infections or conditions that cause inflammation, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.
Age.

Signs of Stroke in Men and Women

Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding speech.
Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance, or lack of coordination.

For more information, please speak with your primary care provider. You can also visit www.nih.gov to read more information.

03/15/2020

Facts about Colorectal Cancer

Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Every year, about 140,000 people in the United States get colorectal cancer, and more than 50,000 people die of it.
Risk increases with age. More than 90% of colorectal cancers occur in people who are 50 years old or older.

Precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms, especially at first. If you have symptoms, they may include blood in or on the stool, stomach pain that doesn’t go away, or losing weight and you don’t know why. If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor.

There are several screening test options. Talk with your doctor about which is right for you.

Only about two-thirds of adults in the United States are up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening.

For more information, you can visit www.cdc.gov

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
03/15/2020

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

03/14/2020

Updated information regarding Coronavirus (COV19)

The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) recognizes and appreciates that Maryland clinicians are central to the mitigation and management of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). This letter provides guidance on testing for COVID-19. It supplements information in the March 6 and March 11, 2020 clinician letters. Since those letters were distributed, COVID-19 community transmission has been documented in Maryland and the region.
In response to this important threshold, Maryland clinicians are advised of the following:
• At this time, we ask that you make every attempt to provide remote care for patients through telemedicine and/or telephonic communications.
o Asymptomatic persons do not need to be tested.
o Mildly symptomatic patients who are otherwise healthy can self -quarantine,
monitoring temperature, and symptoms and check in with the provider as
needed. These patients do not need to be tested.
o Patients who have severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, should seek
care immediately. Older patients and individuals who have underlying medical conditions or are immunocompromised should contact their physician early in the course of even mild illness. In most situations, those patients will need to be evaluated in an emergency department

Dr. Charles DrewHe is the first to use blood plasma to store blood for transfusions.  He was the first Director, America...
02/13/2020

Dr. Charles Drew
He is the first to use blood plasma to store blood for transfusions. He was the first Director, American Red Cross Blood Bank; Professor, Howard University; and Chief Surgeon, Freedmen's Hospital. The U.S. Postal Service issued a Commemorative Stamp with his portrait in 1981. Drew received his M.D. and Master of Surgery (C.M.) degree from McGill University in 1933. On April 1, 1950, Drew died after an auto accident in rural Alamance County, North Carolina.

Solomon Fuller,MDHe is the first black psychiatrist recognized by the American Psychiatric Association.  Dr. Fuller pion...
02/13/2020

Solomon Fuller,MD
He is the first black psychiatrist recognized by the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Fuller pioneered Alzheimer's research during his career and the advance study of many other neurological diseases such as schizophrenia and manic depression. He earned his medical degree form Boston University in 1897.

Dr. Alexa CanadyShe became the first African American woman neurosurgeon in the US in 1981.  She served as the Chief of ...
02/13/2020

Dr. Alexa Canady
She became the first African American woman neurosurgeon in the US in 1981. She served as the Chief of Neurosurgery at the Children's Hospital of Michigan from 1987 - 2001.

Go Red for Women
02/07/2020

Go Red for Women

Today is Go Red for Women.
02/07/2020

Today is Go Red for Women.

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month.  Please make sure that you visit your primary care provider or gyn for your ...
01/03/2020

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Please make sure that you visit your primary care provider or gyn for your annual well woman exams.

01/01/2020

Happy New Year!!!

To: The Bipat FamilyOn behalf of the staff at HB Medical & Wellness Care, we would like to extend our condolences to you...
03/09/2017

To: The Bipat Family
On behalf of the staff at HB Medical & Wellness Care, we would like to extend our condolences to you during this difficult time. We stand together as one united family. We all have gained an angel in Corvon. He will forever be in our hearts.

Love Always, Shawnee', Tish, Shanea, Alexis, Lynn, Jessica & Rebecca.

03/09/2017
HB Medical & Wellness Care

HB Medical & Wellness Care

Our beloved son, Colin Bipat, will be forever loved and missed in our lives and community. Many of our patients knew him from school and our clinic as he often worked with us. It was our dream that he would one day work alongside us full-time, but our plans are not always God's plan. We appreciate all the love and support. We ask for your continued prayers and understanding during this difficult time.

Colin's homecoming will be Friday, March 10th at New Life Church, 9690 Shepherds Creek Pl, Waldorf, MD 20646

03/09/2017

Our beloved son, Colin Bipat, will be forever loved and missed in our lives and community. Many of our patients knew him from school and our clinic as he often worked with us. It was our dream that he would one day work alongside us full-time, but our plans are not always God's plan. We appreciate all the love and support. We ask for your continued prayers and understanding during this difficult time.

Colin's homecoming will be Friday, March 10th at New Life Church, 9690 Shepherds Creek Pl, Waldorf, MD 20646

Wishing you health, happiness and prosperity in 2017!!  Have a safe and happy new year.
12/31/2016

Wishing you health, happiness and prosperity in 2017!! Have a safe and happy new year.

Ladies of HB Medical & Wellness Care representing for our ugly Christmas sweater dinner.  Guess who won?
12/15/2016

Ladies of HB Medical & Wellness Care representing for our ugly Christmas sweater dinner. Guess who won?

Timeline Photos
10/09/2016

Timeline Photos

HB Medical & Wellness Care recognizes October as breast cancer awareness month.
10/09/2016

HB Medical & Wellness Care recognizes October as breast cancer awareness month.

HB Medical & Wellness Care
08/25/2016

HB Medical & Wellness Care

HB Medical and Wellness Care is proud to announce the opening of its 2nd location. Our new location will open on Monday, August 29th, 2016.

The address is 7651 Matapeake Business Drive
Ste 204, Brandywine, MD 20613.

The office will be open to men and women age 16 and up Monday thru Friday from 9am to 5pm.

HB Medical and Wellness Care is proud to announce the opening of its 2nd location.  Our new location will open on Monday...
08/25/2016

HB Medical and Wellness Care is proud to announce the opening of its 2nd location. Our new location will open on Monday, August 29th, 2016.

The address is 7651 Matapeake Business Drive
Ste 204, Brandywine, MD 20613.

The office will be open to men and women age 16 and up Monday thru Friday from 9am to 5pm.

May is National Asthma Awareness MonthWhat Is Asthma?Asthma (AZ-ma) is a chronic (long-term) lung disease that inflames ...
05/04/2016
What Is Asthma? - NHLBI, NIH

May is National Asthma Awareness Month

What Is Asthma?

Asthma (AZ-ma) is a chronic (long-term) lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. Asthma causes recurring periods of wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. The coughing often occurs at night or early in the morning.

Asthma affects people of all ages, but it most often starts during childhood. In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children.

Sometimes asthma symptoms are mild and go away on their own or after minimal treatment with asthma medicine. Other times, symptoms continue to get worse.

When symptoms get more intense and/or more symptoms occur, you're having an asthma attack. Asthma attacks also are called flareups or exacerbations (eg-zas-er-BA-shuns).

Treating symptoms when you first notice them is important. This will help prevent the symptoms from worsening and causing a severe asthma attack. Severe asthma attacks may require emergency care, and they can be fatal.

Asthma has no cure. Even when you feel fine, you still have the disease and it can flare up at any time.

However, with today's knowledge and treatments, most people who have asthma are able to manage the disease. They have few, if any, symptoms. They can live normal, active lives and sleep through the night without interruption from asthma.

If you have asthma, you can take an active role in managing the disease. For successful, thorough, and ongoing treatment, build strong partnerships with your doctor and other health care providers.

for more information, please see your PCP or visit
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/asthma/

May is National Stroke Awareness MonthA stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a blockage stops the flow o...
05/04/2016
www.strokeassociation.org

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a blockage stops the flow of blood to the brain or when a blood vessel in or around the brain bursts. Although many people think of stroke as a condition that affects only older adults, strokes can and do occur in people of all ages. In fact, nearly a quarter of all strokes occur in people younger than age 65.
Each year, almost 800,000 strokes occur in the United States. Strokes often lead to serious, life-changing complications that include
• Paralysis or weakness on one side of the body.
• Problems with thinking, awareness, attention, learning, judgment, and memory.
• Problems understanding or forming speech.
• Difficulty controlling or expressing emotions.
• Numbness or strange sensations.
• Pain in the hands and feet.
• Depression.
When responding to a stroke, every minute counts. The sooner a patient receives medical treatment, the lower the risk for death or disability. If you or someone you know exhibits the following signs or symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately.
• Numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
• Confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding.
• Trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
• Trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance and coordination.
• Severe headache with no known cause.
Remember, getting immediate medical attention for stroke is crucial to preventing disability and death, so don’t delay—dial 9-1-1.
Someone has a stroke every 40 seconds in the U.S. 1
• In the U.S., nearly 800,000 people have a stroke each year.1
• Stroke causes nearly 130,000 deaths each year in the U.S. 1
• Stroke is the No. 2 killer in the world.2

Most strokes are preventable.
• 80% of strokes are preventable.3
• What’s good for your heart is good for your brain.
Stroke is largely treatable.
• The faster you are treated, the more likely you are to recover without permanent disability. Most patients must be evaluated and treated within 3 to 4.5 hours of symptom onset.
Nearly 2 million brain cells die each minute a stroke goes untreated.

for more information, speak to your PCP or visit
www.strokeassociation.org

HB Medical & Wellness Care
04/12/2016

HB Medical & Wellness Care

April is Alcohol Awareness Month.

Alcohol is the #1 misuesed drug in the US. It is not often thought of as a drug but it is! It is a nrevous system depresent that rapidly absorbs in the blood stream from the intestines. The presence of food in the stomach slows down the rate of alcohol absorption. Drinking too much at one time can lead to alcohol poisoning.

Symtoms/Signs of Alcohol Poisoning:
decrease judgement and control
slurred speech
reduce muscle coordination
vomiting
stupor

Ladies, did you know that.....
1- Women absorb alcohol in the bloodstream faster than men but metabolize it slower than men
2- Women who drink heavily on a regular basis are at significantly greater risk for liver damage than men even if they drink less or drink for a shorter period of time.

Please drink responsibly-
1- know what you are drinking and how much you are drinking
2- do not mix alcohol with energy drinks because the caffeine in the energy drinks may mask the effects of the alcohol and lead to too much drinking.
3- drink plenty of water in between drinks
4- never drink and drive

April is Alcohol Awareness Month.Alcohol is the #1 misuesed drug in the US.  It is not often thought of as a drug but it...
04/08/2016

April is Alcohol Awareness Month.

Alcohol is the #1 misuesed drug in the US. It is not often thought of as a drug but it is! It is a nrevous system depresent that rapidly absorbs in the blood stream from the intestines. The presence of food in the stomach slows down the rate of alcohol absorption. Drinking too much at one time can lead to alcohol poisoning.

Symtoms/Signs of Alcohol Poisoning:
decrease judgement and control
slurred speech
reduce muscle coordination
vomiting
stupor

Ladies, did you know that.....
1- Women absorb alcohol in the bloodstream faster than men but metabolize it slower than men
2- Women who drink heavily on a regular basis are at significantly greater risk for liver damage than men even if they drink less or drink for a shorter period of time.

Please drink responsibly-
1- know what you are drinking and how much you are drinking
2- do not mix alcohol with energy drinks because the caffeine in the energy drinks may mask the effects of the alcohol and lead to too much drinking.
3- drink plenty of water in between drinks
4- never drink and drive

Happy National Doctor's Day Dr. Bipat!!!!!!!! From your staff - Colin, Shanea, Jennifer, Alexis, Rebecca, Shawnee', Chan...
03/30/2016

Happy National Doctor's Day Dr. Bipat!!!!!!!! From your staff - Colin, Shanea, Jennifer, Alexis, Rebecca, Shawnee', Chanise and Nikita

March 2-8 is National Multiple Sclerosis Awareness WeekMultiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects the...
03/01/2016

March 2-8 is National Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system. With multiple sclerosis, the brain has difficulty getting messages to the rest of the body. Though we know relatively little about multiple sclerosis, research into its causes and possible treatments is rapidly developing.
Researchers believe that MS causes the body's immune system to attack myelin, which is an insulating coating around nerve cells.

When myelin erodes, communication between nerve cells in the central nervous system is disrupted. When this happens, some parts of the body do not receive instructions from the central nervous system, which controls everything the body does.

The disease can cause varying symptoms that appear with a wide range of severity, from mild discomfort to complete disability.

What Are the Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis?
Multiple sclerosis symptoms vary greatly from patient to patient. Common symptoms include:

numbness or tingling in the limbs
fatigue
muscle spams
fuzzy vision
loss of bladder and bowel control
problems thinking or concentration
balance problems

How Is Multiple Sclerosis Treated?
Though multiple sclerosis has no cure, it can be treated in a variety of ways. New research has also led to new therapies.

Medications
Many medications exist to treat multiple sclerosis for the long term, including new classes of drugs that manipulate the body's immune response. Most are taken intravenously or by injection, but a few come in pill form.

During flare-ups, corticosteroids can offer relief.

Many over-the-counter and prescription medications can help manage the various symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. These include medications for pain, anxiety, muscle spasms, infections, and bladder and bowel problems.

Surgeries
Surgeries may be performed to help control severe tremors and muscle spasms.

Home Care
A variety of vitamins, herbs, and nutritional supplements may offer symptom relief. Always talk to your doctor before beginning one of these regimens.

Yoga, acupuncture, homeopathic remedies, and aquatic exercise are other alternative home therapies that may alleviate symptoms.

Alternative Therapies
Plasmapheresis, also known as plasma exchange, can offer temporary relief during flare-ups.

Physical, speech, and occupational therapies can help someone suffering from multiple sclerosis better perform daily tasks.

Photos from HB Medical & Wellness Care's post
03/01/2016

Photos from HB Medical & Wellness Care's post

03/01/2016

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal cancer is cancer that develops in the tissues of the colon and/or rectum. The colon and the rectum are both found in the lower part of the gastrointestinal (digestive) system. They form a long, muscular tube called the large intestine (or large bowel). The colon absorbs food and water and stores waste. The rectum is responsible for passing waste from the body.

If the cancer began in the colon, which is the first four to five feet of the large intestine, it may be referred to as colon cancer. If the cancer began in the rectum, which is the last several inches of the large intestine leading to the anus, it is called rectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common form of cancer (or third, excluding skin cancers) in both men and women in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimated that 132,700 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2015.

Local colorectal cancer symptoms:

Local symptoms are those that have a direct effect on the colon or rectum. If you experience symptoms of colorectal cancer for an extended period of time, it is important that you visit your healthcare professional. Common local symptoms include:

Changes in your bowel habits
Constipation
Diarrhea
Alternating diarrhea and constipation
Rectal bleeding or blood in your stool
Abdominal bloating, cramps or discomfort
A feeling that your bowel doesn't empty completely
Stools that are thinner than normal

Colorectal cancer risk factors

GENERAL

Age: Although colorectal cancer can occur at any age, the chances of developing the disease dramatically increase after the age of 50.
Racial and ethnic background: African Americans have the highest incidence of this disease in the United States. Ashkenazi Jews also have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer.
BODY

Obesity: Being overweight increases your risk of developing colorectal cancer.
GENETICS

Family history of colorectal cancer: Although the reasons are not clear in all cases, inherited genes, shared environmental factors, or a combination of these factors can increase your colorectal cancer risks.
Inherited syndromes: The two most common inherited syndromes linked with colorectal cancers are familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Other syndromes that can increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer include Lynch Syndrome, Turcot Syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.
LIFESTYLE

Diet: Diets that are high in red and processed meats (e.g., beef, lamb, hot dogs) can increase your colorectal cancer risks. Frying, grilling, broiling or other methods of cooking meats at very high temperatures create chemicals that may also contribute to an increased risk.
Inactive lifestyle: Individuals that live a sedentary lifestyle without physical activity have an increased chance of developing colorectal cancer.
Smoking: Some of the cancer-causing substances associated with smoking are swallowed and can increase the risk of developing this disease.
Alcohol use: Heavy alcohol use can lead to an increased risk of colorectal cancer.
OTHER CONDITIONS

Personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps: If you have had colorectal cancer before, you are more likely to develop cancer in other areas of the colon and rectum.
History of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): Having IBD, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, increases your chances for developing colorectal cancer.
Type II diabetes: There may be an increased risk for rectal cancer associated with type II diabetes. This condition may also affect the prognosis (outlook).

For more information, please visit http://www.cancercenter.com/colorectal-cancer or talk with your primary care provider.

Address

11315 Pembrooke Sq, Ste 111
Waldorf, MD
20603

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 19:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 19:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 13:00

Telephone

(240) 252-2150

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