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Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Coconut Milk...Prep Time: 10 minsCook Time: 25 minsTotal Time: 35 mins Ingredients1 1/2 pound...
22/11/2013

Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Coconut Milk...


Prep Time: 10 mins

Cook Time: 25 mins



Total Time: 35 mins


Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds potato(es), sweet, (about 3 medium)
3/4 cup(s) coconut milk, light
1 tablespoon ginger, fresh, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt





Make Simple Mashed Sweet Potatoes


Preparation


1. Prick sweet potatoes with a fork in several places. Microwave on High until tender all the way to the center, 10 to 15 minutes. (Alternatively, place in a baking dish and bake at 425 degrees F until tender all the way to the center, about 1 hour.)

2. When cool enough to handle, peel off and discard skin. Transfer the sweet potatoes to a medium microwaveable bowl and mash thoroughly with a potato masher. Add coconut milk, ginger and salt; stir well. Reheat in the microwave for 1 to 2 minutes, or in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes. Serve warm.

Rolling Pin Kitchen Emporium
15/10/2013

Rolling Pin Kitchen Emporium

15/10/2013
Kay and anne

Kay and anne

This way of eating is for everyone and at NYW you receive tips and tools to help!

"Changing how you think about food can help you manage your blood sugar levels, weight, and overall health."

By Diane Stresing
Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH
controlling type 2 diabetes with mindful eating
Eating right is the key to managing type 2 diabetes. Good food choices are critical for people with diabetes who want to reduce their risks for heart disease, stroke, and other health problems caused by diabetes.

“When someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, they often have a sense that eating and food are things to be conquered,” says Michelle May, MD, a board-certified family physician who practices in Phoenix. That feeling can seem overwhelming. In fact, says Dr. May, some people may eat before they are hungry, motivated by the fear of having hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. For better control of diabetes, May counsels her patients to employ mindful eating techniques, an approach to food that can help them manage their diets and their lives.

Mindful eating focuses on tuning in to one’s body to recognize basic hunger signals and notice early hypoglycemic symptoms, like feeling dizzy or shaky, and then eating with increased awareness — paying attention to every bite of food. “You have to be prepared to eat when you need to, to respond to your body’s signs,” says May.

Mindful Eating Ends Diabetes Diet Frustrations

May describes mindful eating as “eating with intention and attention.” Instead of thinking about “being good” or adhering to a diabetes diet, May says diabetes patients should be thinking about why, when, what, and how they eat.

A diabetes patient using mindful eating techniques may express intention as “I want to feel well,” “I want to be healthy,” or even “I want to enjoy the food at this party.” Mindful eaters pay attention to the eating experience by “being in the present moment and noticing how good the food tastes,” says May, “and [being aware that] as you eat, the enjoyment decreases as you get used to the flavors and become sated.” That’s your cue to stop eating.

Paying more attention to when, why, how, and what you eat sounds easy. But “many things can influence your choices and your awareness,” May warns. Among the most common distractions to avoid are eating while driving, eating while watching television, and focusing on cleaning your plate rather than on the food itself. Such habits, May says, not only distract people from what they’re eating, but also from the simple pleasure of eating.

Using mindful eating makes the food you eat much more satisfying. People who are keenly aware of what and how they are eating are “more likely to enjoy flavors and textures and the ambience of the eating experience,” May says, and they may also enjoy their lives more fully. “If you eat too much, you feel lethargic and regretful; if you eat the right amount, you feel energetic, content, and ready for your next activity,” she explains. Slowing down can also help you fend off obesity — one study found that middle-aged women who rush through their food tend to be heavier than those who savor every bite.

Mindful Eating in Practice

Mindful eating can help you successfully manage diabetes and get your weight under control, two problems that often go hand in hand. When you’re overweight, says mindful eating practitioner JoAnn Martin, 68, of Phoenix, all you think about is food — “what can I eat and when can I eat it?” With mindful eating, Martin learned how to get her food cues from her stomach rather than her head.

Martin is the mother of seven and had gained more weight after every pregnancy, peaking at 300 pounds. She has had diabetes for decades and started needing insulin injections in the early 1970s, eventually developing insulin resistance. “My sugar was so out of control,” says Martin, who realized that she had to lose weight to avoid risking her life.

After trying many other diets, Martin enrolled in May’s “Am I Hungry?” class, having heard about it through her health insurer. Though it took time for all the information she learned to register, eventually it clicked. By practicing mindful eating, Martin says, she was able to control what and how much she eats: “All of a sudden you get this little voice in your head that says ‘You can stop’ or ‘You’ve had enough.’”

Being conscious of when to put down the fork has enabled Martin to lose 60 pounds and get better control of her diabetes as well. As May explains, mindful eating can make you feel less like a slave to a diabetes diet and help you enjoy food in a healthy manner.

Last Updated: 09/01/2011
This section created and produced exclusively by the editorial staff of EverydayHealth.com. © 2013 EverydayHealth.com; all rights reserved.
More on Staying Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes

Foods That Spike Blood Sugar
Foods That Help and Hurt Type 2 Diabetes
Developing a Type 2 Diabetes Care Plan
A Weight-Training Routine for Diabetes
Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With Mindful Eating
Monitoring Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes
Menu Dos and Don'ts for Type 2 Diabetes
How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Relationships
Kitchen Tips for Diabetes-Friendly Recipes
Walking for Fitness With Diabetes
Dietary Goals for Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes: Look After Your Skin
Staying Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes
When Should You Test Your Blood Sugar?

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More information

Diabetes Nutrition Videos
Nutrition expert Jessica Levinson gives advice on planning a healthy diabetes diet.
Watch the videos.
Foods That Spike Blood Sugar
foods that spike blood sugarEating certain foods can cause weight gain and a surge in blood sugar.
Avoid these foods in your diabetes diet.
Copyright © 2013 Everyday Health Media, LLC
About EverydayHealth.comAbout Everyday Health Media, LLCCareersAd PolicyAdvertise With Us Feedback
adchoices
The material on this web site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not to be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use and privacy policy.

15/10/2013

This way of eating is for everyone and at NYW you receive tips and tools to help!

"Changing how you think about food can help you manage your blood sugar levels, weight, and overall health."

By Diane Stresing
Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH
controlling type 2 diabetes with mindful eating
Eating right is the key to managing type 2 diabetes. Good food choices are critical for people with diabetes who want to reduce their risks for heart disease, stroke, and other health problems caused by diabetes.

“When someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, they often have a sense that eating and food are things to be conquered,” says Michelle May, MD, a board-certified family physician who practices in Phoenix. That feeling can seem overwhelming. In fact, says Dr. May, some people may eat before they are hungry, motivated by the fear of having hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. For better control of diabetes, May counsels her patients to employ mindful eating techniques, an approach to food that can help them manage their diets and their lives.

Mindful eating focuses on tuning in to one’s body to recognize basic hunger signals and notice early hypoglycemic symptoms, like feeling dizzy or shaky, and then eating with increased awareness — paying attention to every bite of food. “You have to be prepared to eat when you need to, to respond to your body’s signs,” says May.

Mindful Eating Ends Diabetes Diet Frustrations

May describes mindful eating as “eating with intention and attention.” Instead of thinking about “being good” or adhering to a diabetes diet, May says diabetes patients should be thinking about why, when, what, and how they eat.

A diabetes patient using mindful eating techniques may express intention as “I want to feel well,” “I want to be healthy,” or even “I want to enjoy the food at this party.” Mindful eaters pay attention to the eating experience by “being in the present moment and noticing how good the food tastes,” says May, “and [being aware that] as you eat, the enjoyment decreases as you get used to the flavors and become sated.” That’s your cue to stop eating.

Paying more attention to when, why, how, and what you eat sounds easy. But “many things can influence your choices and your awareness,” May warns. Among the most common distractions to avoid are eating while driving, eating while watching television, and focusing on cleaning your plate rather than on the food itself. Such habits, May says, not only distract people from what they’re eating, but also from the simple pleasure of eating.

Using mindful eating makes the food you eat much more satisfying. People who are keenly aware of what and how they are eating are “more likely to enjoy flavors and textures and the ambience of the eating experience,” May says, and they may also enjoy their lives more fully. “If you eat too much, you feel lethargic and regretful; if you eat the right amount, you feel energetic, content, and ready for your next activity,” she explains. Slowing down can also help you fend off obesity — one study found that middle-aged women who rush through their food tend to be heavier than those who savor every bite.

Mindful Eating in Practice

Mindful eating can help you successfully manage diabetes and get your weight under control, two problems that often go hand in hand. When you’re overweight, says mindful eating practitioner JoAnn Martin, 68, of Phoenix, all you think about is food — “what can I eat and when can I eat it?” With mindful eating, Martin learned how to get her food cues from her stomach rather than her head.

Martin is the mother of seven and had gained more weight after every pregnancy, peaking at 300 pounds. She has had diabetes for decades and started needing insulin injections in the early 1970s, eventually developing insulin resistance. “My sugar was so out of control,” says Martin, who realized that she had to lose weight to avoid risking her life.

After trying many other diets, Martin enrolled in May’s “Am I Hungry?” class, having heard about it through her health insurer. Though it took time for all the information she learned to register, eventually it clicked. By practicing mindful eating, Martin says, she was able to control what and how much she eats: “All of a sudden you get this little voice in your head that says ‘You can stop’ or ‘You’ve had enough.’”

Being conscious of when to put down the fork has enabled Martin to lose 60 pounds and get better control of her diabetes as well. As May explains, mindful eating can make you feel less like a slave to a diabetes diet and help you enjoy food in a healthy manner.

Last Updated: 09/01/2011
This section created and produced exclusively by the editorial staff of EverydayHealth.com. © 2013 EverydayHealth.com; all rights reserved.
More on Staying Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes

Foods That Spike Blood Sugar
Foods That Help and Hurt Type 2 Diabetes
Developing a Type 2 Diabetes Care Plan
A Weight-Training Routine for Diabetes
Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With Mindful Eating
Monitoring Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes
Menu Dos and Don'ts for Type 2 Diabetes
How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Relationships
Kitchen Tips for Diabetes-Friendly Recipes
Walking for Fitness With Diabetes
Dietary Goals for Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes: Look After Your Skin
Staying Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes
When Should You Test Your Blood Sugar?

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More information

Diabetes Nutrition Videos
Nutrition expert Jessica Levinson gives advice on planning a healthy diabetes diet.
Watch the videos.
Foods That Spike Blood Sugar
foods that spike blood sugarEating certain foods can cause weight gain and a surge in blood sugar.
Avoid these foods in your diabetes diet.
Copyright © 2013 Everyday Health Media, LLC
About EverydayHealth.comAbout Everyday Health Media, LLCCareersAd PolicyAdvertise With Us Feedback
adchoices
The material on this web site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not to be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use and privacy policy.

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