Judy Longstreet

Judy Longstreet Holistic healing to rejuvenate your mind, body and soul. Reflexology, Ear Candling, Therapeutic Touch, Herbal Therapy, Relaxation & Aromatherapy Massage, Indian Head Massage, Hot Stone Massage, Raindrop Therapy, PSYCH-K

Operating as usual

10/20/2021
Reflexology Removes Kidney Stone – TestimonialAlthough practiced since approx. 5,000 B.C. by many eastern cultures, and ...
10/20/2021
Reflexology Removes Kidney Stone Testimonial

Reflexology Removes Kidney Stone – Testimonial

Although practiced since approx. 5,000 B.C. by many eastern cultures, and as early as the turn of the century in North America, Reflexology over the past decade has really begun to gain recognition as more research studies are conducted and the findings are conclusive as to the efficacy of this natural hands-on therapy.

From reducing stress, anxiety and relieving PMS symptoms to aiding in the after effects of chemo and radiation in cancer patients. Reflexology has proven to be an evidence-based application for use in medical settings.

Further attention has been given to the effectiveness of reflexology in aiding the passing of kidney stones and thus eliminating the need for surgery. Check out Regis Philbin's success story from 2012!!!

Regis Philbin praising Reflexology on his Regis & Kelly Live show October 2012 https://youtu.be/agKczQvZO_0

http://www.iReflexology.com Regis Philbin praising Reflexology on his Regis & Kelly Live show October 22nd 2010. Regis says Reflexology got rid of his kidn...

Hot or Cold Therapy – What’s Best For You?What should you apply when you are injured – ice packs or a heating pad?When t...
10/18/2021

Hot or Cold Therapy – What’s Best For You?

What should you apply when you are injured – ice packs or a heating pad?

When to use Cold Therapy?

Cold therapy (also known as cryotherapy) reduces swelling and inflammation. The treatment uses cold packs and ice baths to lower the temperature and treat a variety of tissue lesions. Ice is a vaso-constrictor that slows the blood flow to the injury site. Cold Therapy with ice is the best immediate treatment for acute injuries because it reduces swelling and pain. It is most effective during the first 48 hours on the injured site.

How to Ice an Injury:

Wrap ice in a thin towel and place it on the affected area for a maximum of 20 minutes.
Do not apply for more than 20 minutes as there is a risk of tissue damage.
Allow the skin temperature to return to normal before icing a second or third time.
You can ice an acute injury several times a day for up to three days.

Cryotherapy is also an effective treatment for chronic pain or injuries. It is most commonly used by athletes to treat runner’s knee, tendonitis, sprains and arthritis pain. For instance, an athlete who has knee pain may experience more pain after running. A cold therapy to the injured area after each run can possibly reduce or prevent inflammation.

Heat Therapy – When to apply and when not?

Unlike Cold Therapy, Heat Therapy is used to treat chronic injuries or injuries that have no inflammation or swelling. Also known as thermotherapy, heat therapy uses heat from a variety of products such as; hot water bottles, heating pads, paraffin baths, ultrasound, whirlpool baths, hydrocollator packs, and cordless FIR heat therapy wraps to create higher tissue temperatures. These products increase your blood flow, making connective tissue more flexible and reducing the pain.

If you are suffering from muscle soreness or stiffness and a nagging muscle or joint pain, Heat Therapy is a great treatment option for you.

Apply heat therapy to increase the elasticity of joint connective tissues and stimulate blood circulation. It can also treat tight muscles or muscle spasms.

However, heat therapy should not be applied after exercise. Avoid applying heat to acute injuries or areas of inflammation as heat increases circulation and raises skin temperature.

How to Heat Treat an Injury:

Safely apply heat to an injury 15 to 20 minutes at a time
Use enough layers between your skin and the heating source to prevent burns.
In case of serious injuries, seek medical attention if the injury does not improve (or gets worse) within 48 hours.

Rest, Medication and Exercise Therapy

Whether you use heat or cold therapy, always remember to rest. Resting an injury always allows you to recover faster. Remember to listen to your body.

Hot or Cold Therapy – What’s Best For You?

What should you apply when you are injured – ice packs or a heating pad?

When to use Cold Therapy?

Cold therapy (also known as cryotherapy) reduces swelling and inflammation. The treatment uses cold packs and ice baths to lower the temperature and treat a variety of tissue lesions. Ice is a vaso-constrictor that slows the blood flow to the injury site. Cold Therapy with ice is the best immediate treatment for acute injuries because it reduces swelling and pain. It is most effective during the first 48 hours on the injured site.

How to Ice an Injury:

Wrap ice in a thin towel and place it on the affected area for a maximum of 20 minutes.
Do not apply for more than 20 minutes as there is a risk of tissue damage.
Allow the skin temperature to return to normal before icing a second or third time.
You can ice an acute injury several times a day for up to three days.

Cryotherapy is also an effective treatment for chronic pain or injuries. It is most commonly used by athletes to treat runner’s knee, tendonitis, sprains and arthritis pain. For instance, an athlete who has knee pain may experience more pain after running. A cold therapy to the injured area after each run can possibly reduce or prevent inflammation.

Heat Therapy – When to apply and when not?

Unlike Cold Therapy, Heat Therapy is used to treat chronic injuries or injuries that have no inflammation or swelling. Also known as thermotherapy, heat therapy uses heat from a variety of products such as; hot water bottles, heating pads, paraffin baths, ultrasound, whirlpool baths, hydrocollator packs, and cordless FIR heat therapy wraps to create higher tissue temperatures. These products increase your blood flow, making connective tissue more flexible and reducing the pain.

If you are suffering from muscle soreness or stiffness and a nagging muscle or joint pain, Heat Therapy is a great treatment option for you.

Apply heat therapy to increase the elasticity of joint connective tissues and stimulate blood circulation. It can also treat tight muscles or muscle spasms.

However, heat therapy should not be applied after exercise. Avoid applying heat to acute injuries or areas of inflammation as heat increases circulation and raises skin temperature.

How to Heat Treat an Injury:

Safely apply heat to an injury 15 to 20 minutes at a time
Use enough layers between your skin and the heating source to prevent burns.
In case of serious injuries, seek medical attention if the injury does not improve (or gets worse) within 48 hours.

Rest, Medication and Exercise Therapy

Whether you use heat or cold therapy, always remember to rest. Resting an injury always allows you to recover faster. Remember to listen to your body.

09/16/2021
09/10/2021

Could Getting Dirty and Being Exposed to Germs Boost Your Health?

By Ruben Castaneda and Michael O. Schroeder
Sept. 19, 2019

It's commonplace today for people to clean their hands with antibacterial or antimicrobial soap, spray their bathrooms and kitchens with bleach and other sanitizers and wash their dishes and clothes at "germ-killing" settings. No doubt, it's an effective weapon for keeping germs at bay.

But that doesn't mean we should aim to have our families, including kids whose immune systems are still developing, avoid all germs – if there were even a way to do that. That's because a growing body of research is showing that microbes – microscopic organisms such as bacteria, fungi and viruses – and dirt are crucial for our well-being. Research indicates that early exposures to a variety of microbes may help lower the risk of developing conditions like asthma and allergies.

With the advent of the modern toilets and sewage systems in the early 1900s and subsequent widespread use of antibacterial soaps and other strong cleaning products, living conditions today are much more hygienic than they've ever been before. And that’s a problem, some germ experts say.

According to the hygiene hypothesis, people who grow up in areas with high levels of sanitation lack normal evolutionary exposure to microbes, pollen and other microscopic things in the environment. The lack of that exposure negatively affects the development of their immune system, according to the hypothesis.

Too Sterile

“I’m a sound believer that we’re too clean of a society,” says Dr. Christopher Carpenter, section head of infectious diseases and international medicine at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan. “Our fear of germs has pushed us too far into trying to keep everything safe and sterile. That extreme is harming us more than it’s helping us.”

“We are getting far too sterile,” adds Kiran Krishnan, a microbiologist and chief scientific officer for Microbiome Labs, based in St. Augustine, Florida. “Exposure to microbes is an essential part of being human. Most of our immune system is comprised of tissue that requires activation by the microbes we’re exposed to. The immune system requires the presence of friendly bacteria to regulate its functions. Think of the immune system as an army, with tanks and missiles but no general to lead them. That’s the role friendly microbes play in your body; they’re the general.” The vast majority of microbes, 97% to 99%, are benign or beneficial, and they are the best protection to fight pathogenic microorganisms, Krishnan says.

Carpenter and Krishnan say they aren’t against good hygiene. Instead, they say that modern society has gone overboard with deploying antibacterial soap and germ-killing cleaning products, which indiscriminately kill germs – including good bacteria that help maintain a strong and diverse microbiome. Everyone has a microbiome, a collection of more than 100 trillion microbes that live on and in our body, the majority in our large intestine. “The more diverse your microbiome is, the healthier you are,” Krishnan says.

A study published in 2015 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, an international peer-reviewed journal, studied the effects of the use of bleach – effective in killing germs – in the homes of more than 9,000 kids ages 6 to 12 in Spain, the Netherlands and Finland. The incidence of infections such as the flu, tonsillitis, sinusitis, bronchitis and pneumonia was more prevalent in the homes where bleach was used, the study found.

The hygiene hypothesis, however, is more than just about how sanitized modern households have grown. Kids come into contact with microbes in a variety of ways, including contact with family members and animals and just being outdoors. Your mom probably scolded you for playing in the dirt, but doing so may be healthy, according to a 2016 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers studied two traditional Christian farming groups: Amish schoolchildren and Hutterite kids. The Amish practice traditional farming, using hand-held tools, while the Hutterites use modern farm equipment, such as tractors and front loaders.

Compared to the Hutterite kids, the Amish group had a far lower prevalence of asthma, the study found. Researchers tested the blood of the kids in both groups and found the Amish children had significantly more white blood cells, which are key to fighting infections. One study author theorized the Amish kids had more white blood cells because they had a greater exposure to microbes, which boosted their immune system.

Going beyond cleanliness, other factors, from diet to overuse of antibiotics, also affect the balance of bugs in your microbiome. In addition, the decreasing lack of microbe exposure is also in part to the increasing rates of cesarean births, say proponents of the hygiene hypothesis. There's also evidence to show that what happens in utero and birth also has an impact on the bugs in their guts. Namely, research finds that vaginal birth exposes children to healthy microbes that help to establish a healthy gut microbiome, as compared with being delivered by cesarean section. Consider the evidence, a 2018 paper published in The Lancet, notes that risks of C-section include altered immune development, an increased likelihood of allergy and asthma and reduced intestinal gut microbiome diversity in children.

But while there's much support for vaginal birth, when safe, there's some dispute about the extent to which natural birth may help with gut health and protect against disease over the long term. "In particular, epidemiological studies have linked cesarean delivery with increased rates of asthma, allergies, autoimmune disorders, and obesity," a 2018 research review published in Frontiers in Medicine notes. But it suggests that other factors, ranging from the reason the C-section was performed to whether or not a baby is breastfed to maternal age, drive changes in the infant's microbiome.

Critics of the hygiene hypothesis say the idea, or at the very least, the way it's labeled is overly simplistic. Certainly, we want to encourage things like cleaning up after handling raw chicken and being careful about germs when family members have the flu or other viruses. As such, some researchers have advocated for a rebranding, as noted in an article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, including advocating for "targeted hygiene" instead.

Welcome Those Microbes

You don’t have to live or work on a farm to boost the diversity of your microbiome. Experts suggests these strategies:

Get a tally of your microbiome.
Reduce your use of chlorine-based cleaners.
Skip the antibacterial soaps.
Start a garden.
Consider getting a pet.
Have closer interactions with people.

Get a tally of your microbiome. A small percentage of microbes – such as Clostridium difficile, a bacteria that can cause severe diarrhea in people on antibiotics – can be harmful if your microbiome is not diverse enough. You won't know how diverse yours is unless you participate in a clinical study testing your colonic flora, the collection of microorganisms inside the digestive tract, Carpenter says. However, you can sign up with the American Gut Project, run by researchers at UC San Diego, to send in a stool sample for an analysis to identify the various microbes found in your sample. "They can give you an idea of the type of microbes in your intestines, which will give you an idea of the diversity," Krishnan says. In addition, participants can also send in skin swabs to the American Gut Project to learn about the microbes that are living there as well.

There are simple ways to boost your microbe diversity, Krishnan says. "Almost everywhere we go in the environment, from parks to woods to rivers, we come into contact with microbes." They can enter our respiratory system, our digestive system or just hang on our skin.

Reduce your use of chlorine-based cleaners. Such products can help sterilize surfaces, but living in a sterilized environment can be bad for your microbiome. “You actually want to build a healthy microbial environment in your house,” Krishnan says. “You don’t want to live in a sterilized house.”

Skip the antibacterial soaps. Unless you're in a hospital and need to avoid infection, skip the antibacterial soap, which kills all microbes indiscriminately, bad and good ones, Carpenter advises. Regular cleaners and soaps, citrus-based cleaning products and mixtures of lemon juice and water are typically fine alternatives, the microbiologist says, because they'll protect you from infection but won't kill the microbes on your hands.

Start a garden. This is a great way to get your hands in the dirt, and encourage kids to do the same. As a bonus, planting veggies can help you diversify what's on your plate and eat fresh whole foods, which can also prove a boon to gut health.

Consider getting a pet. Having a pet allergy can make close contact with four-legged friends dicey. But there's research to suggest that early exposure to pets – or livestock for that matter – can reduce kids' risk of developing asthma. At the very least, you could let your kids play with a (trusted) neighbor of family member's pet.

Have closer interactions with people. “We don’t hug and kiss as much as we should,” Krishnan says. “We need closer interactions with other humans, because that exchange of microbes is important for your immune system.”

Such interactions can expose you to a greater variety of microbes, boosting the diversity of your microbiome – and potentially keeping you healthier.

Sources

The U.S. News Health team delivers accurate information about health, nutrition and fitness, as well as in-depth medical condition guides. All of our stories rely on multiple, independent sources and experts in the field, such as medical doctors and licensed nutritionists. To learn more about how we keep our content accurate and trustworthy, read our editorial guidelines.

Christopher Carpenter, MD

Kiran Krishnan, PhD

09/02/2021

Holistic Wellness With Judy – "Think Less, Feel More”

When we begin to listen with our hearts rather than our heads, our whole world changes and becomes softer.

Most of us were born and raised in cultures that value the head over the heart and, as a result, we place our own hearts below our heads in a sort of inner hierarchy of which we may not be conscious. What this means is that we tend to listen and respond from the neck up, often leaving the rest of our bodies with little or no say in most matters. This is a physical habit, which sometimes feels as ingrained as the way we breathe or walk. However, with effort and awareness, we can shift the energy into our hearts, listening and responding from this much deeper, more resonant place.

The brain has a masterful way of imposing structure and order on the world, creating divisions and categories, devising plans and strategies. In many ways, we have our brains to thank for our survival on this planet. However, as is so clear at this time, we also need the wisdom of our hearts if we wish to continue surviving in a viable way. When we listen from our heart, the logical grid of the brain tends to soften and melt, which enables us to perceive the interconnectedness beneath the divisions and categories we use to organize the world. We begin to understand that just as the heart underlies the brain, this interconnectedness underlies everything. Many agree that this is the most important work we can do at this time in history.

For a simple start, try sitting with a friend and asking them to tell you about their life at this moment. For 10 minutes or more, try to listen without responding verbally, offering suggestions, or brainstorming solutions. Instead, breathe into your heart and your belly, listening and feeling instead of thinking. When you do this, you may find that it's much more difficult to offer advice and much easier to identify with the feelings your friend is sharing. You may also find that your friend opens up more, goes deeper, and feels they have really been heard. If you also feel great warmth and compassion, almost as if you are seeing your friend for the first time, then you will know that you have begun to tap the power of listening with your heart.

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