Apollon Pharmacy

Apollon Pharmacy Providing optimal pharmaceutical care to our patients.

Operating as usual

We would like to wish everyone a Happy Labour Day and remind our patients that our pharmacy will be closed on Monday Sep...
09/05/2021

We would like to wish everyone a Happy Labour Day and remind our patients that our pharmacy will be closed on Monday September 6th to celebrate the holiday.
We will be open again starting on Tuesday.

We would like to wish everyone a Happy Labour Day and remind our patients that our pharmacy will be closed on Monday September 6th to celebrate the holiday.
We will be open again starting on Tuesday.

Apollon Pharmacy is now able to offer you Rapid Tests for travelling purposes.  If you are travelling to Greece or any o...
06/23/2021

Apollon Pharmacy is now able to offer you Rapid Tests for travelling purposes.
If you are travelling to Greece or any other country that requires a negative rapid test to enter (please visit https://travel.gov.gr/#/ for entry requirements to Greece), we are now able to provide you with rapid tests at a cost of $50.
Please call us at 416.463.1195 to book your appointment.

Apollon Pharmacy is now able to offer you Rapid Tests for travelling purposes.
If you are travelling to Greece or any other country that requires a negative rapid test to enter (please visit https://travel.gov.gr/#/ for entry requirements to Greece), we are now able to provide you with rapid tests at a cost of $50.
Please call us at 416.463.1195 to book your appointment.

04/28/2021

Apollon Pharmacy is now offering Covid19 Rapid tests for $30. Test results in 15 minutes. Call us to book your appointment.

04/28/2021

Apollon Pharmacy will be open on Friday April 30, Greek Orthodox Good Friday, from 9am until 2pm.

Great infographic on how viral vector vaccines like Astra Zeneca and J&J work
04/22/2021

Great infographic on how viral vector vaccines like Astra Zeneca and J&J work

Great infographic on how viral vector vaccines like Astra Zeneca and J&J work

03/29/2021

Apollon Pharmacy will be closed on Good Friday (Friday April 2nd).

Apollon Pharmacy honors the 200 year anniversary for the Greek Independence
03/22/2021

Apollon Pharmacy honors the 200 year anniversary for the Greek Independence

Apollon Pharmacy honors the 200 year anniversary for the Greek Independence

How do mRNA vaccines work?
03/16/2021

How do mRNA vaccines work?

How do mRNA vaccines work?

12/16/2020

Holiday hours
Dec 24: 9:00am - 2pm
Dec 25 Closed
Dec 26 Closed
Dec 31: 9:00am - 2pm
Jan 1 Closed

We would like to wish you and your loved ones a Merry Christmas and a happy New Year

06/18/2020
03/23/2020

Apollon Pharmacy is taking some measures in our pharmacy to combat the Covid-19 pandemic.
We ask all of our patients to call us at 416.463.1195 to order their prescriptions so they can be ready for pick up or request a delivery.
Following the Government of Canada guidelines about social distancing, only 1 patient is allowed in the pharmacy at a time.
The pharmacy is only open for prescription pick up and drop off.
We have installed glass shields at the cash of the pharmacy for our patient’s and our staff’s safety.

Stay home and stay safe.

02/28/2020

What is the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)?
Novel coronaviruses are new strains of coronaviruses that have not been previously identified in
humans. A novel coronavirus has emerged in Wuhan, China which is called the 2019 Novel
Coronavirus or COVID-19.
Signs and Symptoms
In general, human coronaviruses commonly cause mild but occasionally more severe respiratory
infections. It is estimated that they cause about 15% of common colds. Coronaviruses can also
cause more severe illness, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East
respiratory syndrome (MERS).
Some of the symptoms of COVID-19 include:
• Fever
• Cough
• Muscle aches and tiredness
• Difficulty breathing
• Less commonly: sore throat, headache and diarrhea have been reported.
Older patients and those with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk for severe illness.
Diagnosis and Testing
In general, coronavirus infections are diagnosed by a healthcare provider based on signs,
symptoms, and laboratory tests. Travel history is also important. There is a specific test for
COVID-19 to confirm the infection if it is suspected.
Treatment
There is no specific antiviral treatment for COVID-19. People ill with COVID-19 should receive
supportive care to help relieve symptoms. People with more severe illness may require
hospitalization.
Prevention
There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid
being exposed to this virus. Prevention measures include:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are ill.
• Stay home when you are ill.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then immediately throw the tissue in the
garbage and clean your hands.
• If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve or arm.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a household cleaner.

Starting this week our pharmacist owner, George Christopoulos, will be writing a weekly article in the Hellas Newspaper ...
02/14/2020

Starting this week our pharmacist owner, George Christopoulos, will be writing a weekly article in the Hellas Newspaper (published every Friday). Grab your copy of the paper from our pharmacy or read the online version at Hellas News Canada & US

We are proud sponsors of the theatrical production by Ekfrassi Performing and Expressive Arts “Kontylenia” featuring loc...
02/08/2020

We are proud sponsors of the theatrical production by Ekfrassi Performing and Expressive Arts “Kontylenia” featuring local talent. If you don’t have plans this weekend check it out. Limited tickets are still available.

Here is some advice for our patients regarding the Corona Virus
02/08/2020

Here is some advice for our patients regarding the Corona Virus

Today is World Cancer Day
02/05/2020

Today is World Cancer Day

Apollon Pharmacy is all decorated and waiting for Christmas to arrive.
11/21/2019

Apollon Pharmacy is all decorated and waiting for Christmas to arrive.

08/08/2019

What You Should Expect When You Visit Your Pharmacy

As a patient, you are entitled to a high standard of care. Knowing what you should expect next time you go to your pharmacy will help you get the most out of your experience and support your health goals.

When you visit your pharmacy, you should expect:

To be treated fairly and with dignity and respect. Pharmacy professionals are important members of your healthcare team and it’s key that you feel supported and respected in your interactions with them

Pharmacy staff to protect your personal health information. Pharmacy professionals have an obligation to keep your information safe and secure at all times

That your pharmacist will speak with you in a private or quiet area of the pharmacy to discuss your health and medications, if requested. This can support an open discussion between you and your pharmacist about your health needs

To be able to ask your pharmacist questions and to feel comfortable asking him or her to schedule more time with you to address any questions you may have. As a medication expert, your pharmacist can help you understand all of the medications you’ve been prescribed and how to take them properly

To be able to speak with your pharmacist or the pharmacy manager about any concerns you may have. Your experience at the pharmacy is important to everyone and good communication helps

Apollon Pharmacy is doing their part to make sure Kawhi Leonard re-signs with the Raptors #WeTheNorth
05/30/2019

Apollon Pharmacy is doing their part to make sure Kawhi Leonard re-signs with the Raptors
#WeTheNorth

Tick season is coming, which means increased risk of contacting Lyme disease. Read below to see how you can protect your...
05/10/2019

Tick season is coming, which means increased risk of contacting Lyme disease. Read below to see how you can protect yourself and your family.

Apollon Pharmacy would like to wish our patients and followers Happy Easter
04/26/2019

Apollon Pharmacy would like to wish our patients and followers Happy Easter

04/24/2019

We will be open on Greek Orthodox Good Friday April 26 from 9 am until 2pm

04/18/2019

Apollon Pharmacy Easter hours:
Friday April 19 Closed
Saturday April 20 10am-1pm
Sunday April 21 Closed
Monday April 22 9am - 6pm
Friday April 26 9am - 2pm

04/10/2019

MANAGING A DIET WHILE TAKING WARFARIN

Warfarin is a drug used to prevent blood clots from occurring and to prevent already formed clots from getting bigger. It works by prolonging the time required for blood to clot. Having a balanced diet is always something important to consider; however, when taking warfarin, deciding on what food you eat becomes more important than just a consideration.

Warfarin and Foods that Contain Vitamin K
Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting.
Eating larger than normal amounts of vitamin K-containing foods can work against warfarin’s effects by lowering the time required for a clot to form, making warfarin less effective.
For warfarin to maintain proper function, the level of vitamin K in the body must be kept constant. If your vitamin K levels are frequently changing, it could alter the effects of warfarin and potentially increase risk of complications such as blood clots.
Be aware of foods containing vitamin K. Leafy green vegetables (e.g., kale, broccoli, spinach, collard or turnip greens, and Brussels sprouts) have some of the highest vitamin K levels in food.
Speak to your pharmacist to learn more about how much vitamin K is contained in various foods.
Rather than avoiding these foods, patients should aim to consume relatively similar amounts of vitamin K contained in foods each week and avoid large day-to-day variations. For example, try to keep daily meals consistent (e.g., salad at lunch, cooked green vegetables at dinner). If you are unable to have similar daily meals, try to keep them similar weekly (e.g., 3 or 4 days each week of green vegetables at dinner).
Recognize common circumstances that can cause a change in dietary vitamin K levels such as:
Eating more green vegetables than usual
Having the flu and not eating routinely
Being admitted to the hospital on a limited diet
Consuming different foods while travelling

2.Warfarin and Other Foods:
There are additional foods that, although contain very low levels of vitamin K, may still prevent warfarin from working properly.
For example, if you consume cranberry juice, brewed green tea, grapefruit, and/or grapefruit juice, you may have to limit the amount to 1 to 2 servings per day.
Note: This list is not inclusive of all foods. Speak to your pharmacist for more information about food interactions with warfarin.

3. Warfarin and Alcohol
Consuming too much alcohol while taking warfarin can increase your risk of bleeding.
It is also recommended to avoid drinking a lot of alcohol over a short period of time.
If you drink alcohol, it is suggested to limit intake to 1 to 2 servings per day. Some examples of a serving include: 1 beer (12 ounces), 1 glass of wine (5 ounces), or 1 shot of liquor (1.5 ounces).
The amount you can safely drink also depends on body size and medical conditions. Consult with your pharmacist for more details.

Keep in mind that along with the items listed above, warfarin can also interact with medications, herbals and natural health products, vitamins, minerals, and more.
Speak to your pharmacist for more information.

Apollon Pharmacy's cover photo
04/04/2019

Apollon Pharmacy's cover photo

04/04/2019

Pharmacist’s Guide to Healthy Diet

With summer growing closer, the thought of weight and being healthier become a key concern for many Canadians. There are endless debates on which diet work the best for weight loss. However, a healthy diet has been shown to optimally promote and confer health benefits. The list of diets used by patients are is lengthy, and although each claim to be the magic to weight management or optimal health, most have not been carefully evaluated.

Here is the evidence for health benefits of several popular eating patterns.

Mediterranean
The Mediterranean diet is perhaps one of the best known and one of the first diets that showed evidence for cardiovascular benefits. It has been well documented to be associated with increased longevity, preserved cognition, and reduced risk of cardiovascular risk. Recent meta-analysis of more than 100,000 individuals shown that adherence to the Mediterranean diet is also associated with lower risk of developing diabetes.
Includes:
Fish
Monosaturated fats from olive oil
Fruits
Vegetables
Whole grains
Legumes/nuts
Moderate alcohol consumption

Restricts
Limits red meat, refined grains, and sugars.

Health Benefit
▼ Type 2 diabetes
▼ Retinopathy
▼ Cancer incidence and mortality
▼ Age-related cognitive decline
▼ Cardiovascular incidence and mortality
▼ Overall mortality
▼ Weight
▲ A1C

DASH diet
Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet was originally tested for reducing blood pressure, and was subsequently applied to both weight loss and general health promotion.
Research on the DASH dietary pattern has shown that it not only can lower blood pressure but also improve other risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as HDL cholesterol levels, triglycerides or blood sugar.

Includes
52% - 55% carbohydrates
16% - 18% proteins
30% total fats
Rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products

Restricts
Limits saturated fats, cholesterol, refined grains, and sugars.
Suggested sodium intake is less than 2,400 mg per day.

Health Benefit
▼ Cardiovascular risk factors
▼ Low-density lipoprotein
▼ Blood pressure
▼ Weight
▼ A1C
▼ Low-density lipoprotein


Vegetarian/vegan diet
The effect of vegetarian/vegan diet is difficult to isolate because many trials involving those diets are also associated with calorie restriction and weight loss. One trial involving low-fat vegan diet without calorie restriction resulted in improved fasting glucose, triglyceride, and LDL level over 74 weeks. Greater green leafy vegetable intake overall is associated with lower risk of developing diabetes.

One has to be cautious when executing a vegetarian/vegan diet, because eating only plant foods does not guarantee a healthful balanced diet. Sugar is of plant origin. If not properly executed, a vegan diet can combine the adverse exposure to plant based caloric dense food with nutritional deficiencies.

Includes
Plant-based foods: grains, plant oils, nuts, seeds, legumes, fruits, and vegetables.

Restricts
Vegetarian diet avoids red meat, pork, poultry, fish and possibly eggs.
Vegan diet excludes all animal products and in some cases, honey.

Health Benefit
Vegetarian diet:
▼ Rates of type 2 diabetes
▼ Coronary artery disease

Vegan diet:
▼ Rates of hypertension
▼ Weight
▼ Cardiovascular disease mortality

Special consideration:
Concern about vitamin deficiencies with vegan diets, especially with vitamin B12.
Supplementation may be necessary.
Persons choosing a vegetarian diet should make sure to eat foods from all food groups

Low-fat
Low-fat diet sets the fat intake to less than 20% of total daily calories, whereas a standard diet typically has fat intake between 20% - 40% of total daily calories. Very-low-fat diet has been shown to cause regression of coronary atherosclerosis. However, there is no decisive evidence that low-fat diet is better than diets higher in healthful fat in terms of health outcomes. Diets with fat ranging from 33% - 44% of daily calorie intake have similar effects on blood glucose and insulin level in people with obesity as low-fat diets. There is mounting evidence that the quality of fat is more important than the quantity of fat10. Diets rich in unsaturated fat from sources such as olive oil, avocadoes, nuts/seeds, and oily fish result in fewer cardiovascular disease incidences compared to diets with saturated fat and animal-based fat.

Low-carbohydrate diet
Any diet with carbohydrate intake less than 45% of total calories is considered a low-carbohydrate diet. A diet containing less than 30 g of carbohydrates, or about 5% of daily intake, is considered to be a ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets shifts dietary intake to higher levels of fat and/or protein. Studies of low-carbohydrate diet in the setting of weight loss have shown potentially beneficial metabolic effects; however, those studies are confounded by calorie restriction and weight loss, which in itself may have beneficial effect on blood lipid parameters.
Without calorie restriction, high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets can contribute to weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. Low-carbohydrate diets are also at risk of nutritional deficiency. Consuming excess protein in the low-carbohydrate/high protein diet required for ketosis induces hyperuricemia, which may promote nephropathy and arthritis. Adverse effects of a ketogenic diet include dehydration, gastrointestinal symptoms, hypoglycemia, and carnitine and vitamin deficiencies.

Bottom line:
Patients are often overwhelmed with information on diet and the nutritional value of foods. Although weight loss is a common focus for patients, no diet has been proven to be superior to others. However, when health is considered, dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, and vegetarian/vegan diet have good evidence for primary and secondary prevention of several chronic diseases. Diets that restrict certain macronutrient ill advised they have not been proven to be beneficial and may lead to adverse effects. Long-term health benefits require long-term adherence to a balanced diet.

02/15/2019

If you’re feeling under the weather, here are some tips to help you feel better faster

1. Make sure you actually have the
flu, not a cold. How can you tell the
difference? Symptoms of the flu can
vary from person to person, but they
usually include fever (temperature
higher than 100ºF or 37.8ºC),
headache, muscle aches, fatigue,
cough, and sometimes cold-like
symptoms such as runny nose and
sore throat. Fever can last between
two and five days. You don’t usually
get a fever with a cold, and if you
do, it usually goes away in 24 to 48
hours. Generally, flu symptoms get
better over two to five days, but the
illness can last for a week or more.
2. Know when to see your doctor.
Some people with the flu will get
better on their own in one to two
weeks. However, if you experience
any difficulty breathing/shortness of
breath, pressure or pain in your chest
or stomach, dizziness or confusion,
or severe vomiting, you should see
a doctor immediately. The same
applies to those who are at higher
risk for flu complications (e.g.,
young children, seniors, pregnant
women, people with diabetes
or asthma). In some cases, the
doctor may prescribe an antiviral
medication since antibiotics don’t
work to treat the flu. If you need an
antiviral medication, it’s best started
within 48 hours of the onset of flu
symptoms, so make sure you see a
doctor right away.
3. Stay home, rest, and drink plenty of
fluids. Make sure you don’t go back
to school or work until your fever is
gone for at least 24 hours without
the need for any fever-reducing
medication (such as acetaminophen).
However, if you’re still in pain and
have a fever, you can keep taking it
as recommended by your pharmacist
or doctor.
4. Stay away from over-the-counter
alternative remedies. There are
many herbal, homeopathic, and
alternative treatments marketed for
influenza. Unfortunately, there’s still
no proof that these treatments work
and there’s no guarantee that they’re
safe for you to take. It’s better to
skip these remedies for now.
5. Prevention is the key to avoid
spreading the flu and catching it
again in the future. Wash your hands
often with soap and water. Keep
your distance from others when
you’re sick and cover your mouth
and nose with the inside of your
elbow when you cough or sneeze.
Don’t forget to get your flu shot
when you’re better (if you haven’t
gotten it already this year)!

Address

698 Danforth Ave
Toronto, ON
M4J1L1

General information

Specialty pharmacy providing optimal pharmaceutical service to the neighborhood for over 40 years

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 1pm

Telephone

+14164631195

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