Women's Brain Health Initiative

Women's Brain Health Initiative Raising funds for research and education to combat women's brain aging diseases. Because our grey matter, matters.
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Women’s Brain Health Initiative (WBHI) helps protect women’s brain health by focusing its resources on research to combat brain-aging disorders that disproportionately affect women, and by creating compelling preventative health education programs, grounded in science, so there is a greater understanding by the public of the best ways to prolong their cognitive vitality. Our Six Pillars of Brain Health are the most important lifestyle choices that protect your brain health as you age.

A longitudinal study by University of Queensland researchers has found that high-intensity interval exercise improves br...
07/13/2024

A longitudinal study by University of Queensland researchers has found that high-intensity interval exercise improves brain function in older adults for up to 5 years.

Emeritus Professor Bartlett said it is the first controlled study to show exercise can boost cognition in healthy older adults, not just delay cognitive decline. “Six months of high-intensity interval training is enough to flick the switch.”

During the study, the researchers assessed the impact of three exercise intensities: • Low — predominantly motor function, balance and stretching • Medium — brisk walking on a treadmill • High — four cycles running on a treadmill at near maximum exertion.

On high-resolution MRI scans of that group, researchers saw structural and connectivity changes in the hippocampus, the area responsible for learning and memory. With 1 in 3 people aged 85 years likely to develop dementia, the impact of the research was far-reaching.

The research was published in Aging and Disease.

Studies increasingly show that a maternal, but not paternal, history is linked to Alzheimer’s.According to cross-section...
07/04/2024

Studies increasingly show that a maternal, but not paternal, history is linked to Alzheimer’s.

According to cross-sectional data from the A4 trial involving 4,413 people with an average age of about 71, of whom 59.3% were women, cognitively normal people whose mothers had a history of dementia or significant memory impairment were more likely to have higher levels of brain amyloid-beta, a marker associated with Alzheimer’s.

The research, reported by Hyun-Sik Yang, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues in JAMA Neurology, found that maternal history of memory impairment was linked to increased PET amyloid in asymptomatic older adults, regardless of whether the mother’s onset was early or late.

Paternal memory impairment before age 65 was associated with higher amyloid in offspring, but later onset was not.

Sensitivity analyses showed significant relationships between amyloid levels and a maternal clinical Alzheimer’s diagnosis or an autopsy-confirmed diagnosis. In contrast, relationships between amyloid levels and a paternal clinical or autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer’s diagnosis were not significant.

Long weekends and vacations provide the necessary downtime to help put your mind at rest and replenish your brain.Perpet...
06/28/2024

Long weekends and vacations provide the necessary downtime to help put your mind at rest and replenish your brain.

Perpetual busyness does not translate to better productivity and is not particularly healthy. Downtime helps alleviate cerebral congestion, encourages productivity and creativity and is essential for forming stable memories in everyday life.

So, revitalize your body and mind and enjoy your day off!

Your brain needs restorative sleep to function properly and reduce your risk of dementia. Some results from the world’s ...
06/26/2024

Your brain needs restorative sleep to function properly and reduce your risk of dementia.

Some results from the world’s largest sleep study, published in SLEEP, have shown that sleeping too little or too much can negatively impact cognitive performance. The study used the power of the Internet to investigate the relationship between self-reported amount of sleep and cognitive performance (measured using a set of 12 tests completed online).
 
“In our global sample of over 10,000 people, we found that cognitive performance was impaired – specifically on tasks that measured problem solving and verbal ability – in the participants who reported typically sleeping less, or more, than seven to eight hours each night – and that was about half of the participants,” said Dr. Conor Wild, lead author of the paper and a Research Associate at The Owen Lab at Western University.
 
“People who are highly sleep deprived are at particular risk. We estimate that, in terms of overall cognition, a typical sleep duration of four hours per night is equivalent to aging eight years.”

What healthy habits are you going to try in July?Ingraining healthy new habits takes longer than we’d like to think. Tra...
06/25/2024

What healthy habits are you going to try in July?

Ingraining healthy new habits takes longer than we’d like to think. Tracking these habits makes remembering and following them easier in the long term.

BrainFit - Habit Tracker is the only app that tracks all 6 pillars of brain health to reduce your risk of dementia. It’s evidence-backed by peer-reviewed journals.

Add habits, set reminders, and track your progress. It’s free, customizable, and 100% confidential—no sign-up required.

📲VISIT LINK IN BIO TO DOWNLOAD NOW OR CHECK OUT

Recent research indicates that women who undergo early menopause and later develop Alzheimer’s disease have higher level...
06/19/2024

Recent research indicates that women who undergo early menopause and later develop Alzheimer’s disease have higher levels of a protein
called tau in their brains, which is a hallmark of the disease. Tau is crucial for stabilizing neurons—the nerve cells responsible for transmitting messages throughout the body, enabling functions such as breathing, talking, eating, walking, and thinking. In Alzheimer’s patients, tau forms toxic tangles that contribute to brain function deterioration and memory loss.

A new study in Science Advances highlights that boosting a brain protein called CYP46A1 might protect women from Alzheimer’s disease. This protein helps remove excess cholesterol from the brain. When researchers increased CYP46A1 levels in mice, the mice had healthier brain cells and more estrogen activity in the hippocampus, an important area for memory.

Female mice with higher CYP46A1 levels showed better memory. Like humans, mice lose memory as they age, and menopausal mice have more memory problems than those who aren’t menopausal. Activating CYP46A1 helped prevent memory loss in aging and menopausal female mice.

However, in male mice, increasing CYP46A1 worsened memory and caused a build-up of the male hormone dihydrotestosterone in their brains. The protective effect of high CYP46A1 levels against Alzheimer’s seems specific to females.
Previous studies found that the anti-HIV drug Efavirenz can activate CYP46A1. Efavirenz has shown promise as an Alzheimer’s treatment because it helps reduce harmful protein clumps in the brain.

This study suggests that CYP46A1 activation works differently in men and women, offering significant benefits for women. Drugs like Efavirenz that activate CYP46A1 could be a new way to boost brain protection in women at risk for Alzheimer’s, especially those experiencing early menopause.

This method differs from hormone replacement therapies (HRT), which have shown mixed results. HRT seems to reduce Alzheimer’s risk when administered during menopause symptoms but offers no protective effect post-menopause and remains a controversial treatment.

A recent study indicates that excessive total sugar intake is significantly associated with Alzheimer’s risk in women.Pu...
06/18/2024

A recent study indicates that excessive total sugar intake is significantly associated with Alzheimer’s risk in women.

Published in Nutritional Neuroscience with 37,689 people, those who consumed about 10 grams (2.4 teaspoons) of sugar daily had the largest risk increase. Lactose, the sugar found in milk and milk products, had the strongest link to Alzheimer’s among the sugar types studied. Managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels early may help lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s later.

One practical way to reduce sugar intake is limiting or eliminating sugary beverages. A separate study published in The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease found that higher consumption of sugar in beverages was associated with an increased risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s, and stroke.

How much sugar is in your diet?

Women’s Brain Health Initiative (WBHI) is a national charity established in 2012. We fund gender-based brain-aging disea...
06/17/2024

Women’s Brain Health Initiative (WBHI) is a national charity established in 2012. We fund gender-based brain-aging disease research and create effective preventative health education programs to give the public the information they need to stay brain-healthy longer.

Dozens of experts in science, business, caregiving, and public engagement power our work. We hope you’ll join us to help women and families stay connected to everything that makes their lives meaningful.

If you find yourself forgetting things, having trouble organizing your day or experiencing emotional outbursts at any ag...
06/12/2024

If you find yourself forgetting things, having trouble organizing your day or experiencing emotional outbursts at any age, this does not automatically mean that you have an undiagnosed cognitive disorder.

Life and job stressors, lack of sleep, and changes to your daily routine can all negatively affect your memory, ability to plan, and feelings of emotional control. There are also natural changes in cognitive function that occur with age among healthy individuals. 

There are strategies designed to help hone your memory skills, such as:
 1.  Keep your mind active - Engage in activities that make you think and learn new things; games (puzzles, cards, chess), socializing, attending cultural events, and reading books.
2.  Keep your body healthy. - Exercise, sleep, do something you enjoy, get regular medical check-ups.
3.  Manage stress. Participate in activities you find relaxing every day.
4.  Write things down. Use a pocket day planner or electronic organizer to keep track of your schedule, frequently called phone numbers, “to do” lists, current medications.
5.  Repeat information to yourself. If you want to memorize something, repeat it to yourself several times and gradually spread the repetitions over longer intervals.
6.  Pay attention. It is hard to remember something you did not pay full attention to in the first place. 
7.  Talk to yourself. State out loud (or to yourself) the task you intend to do or are currently doing. This will help you remember it.
8.  Make things meaningful. If you want to remember a name, think about what the name means or associate it with someone or something that reminds you of the name.
9.   Routine is the key. Memory strategies work best when they are used consistently.
10. Maintain a positive outlook. You can do things to improve your memory, and you have control over these things.

Social isolation can negatively impact our brain health, and a recent study found loneliness increases the risk of demen...
06/10/2024

Social isolation can negatively impact our brain health, and a recent study found loneliness increases the risk of dementia in older adults by as much as 64%.

As we get older, our social options often get smaller, yet our pattern of dependency increases. Being lonely may be causing memory problems but memory problems don’t necessarily cause loneliness.

Working on expanding your social networks will contribute to increased activity, mental stimulation, and improve overall brain health, and making those additional efforts when you are younger will be beneficial in later years.

Thanks to Presenting Sponsor RBC Wealth Management, Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds recently took place in London, ON. Att...
06/07/2024

Thanks to Presenting Sponsor RBC Wealth Management, Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds recently took place in London, ON. Attendees were treated to an illuminating panel discussion on safeguarding against dementia, heart disease, and cancer with experts Vivien Brown, Liisa Galea, Patrice Lindsay, and Dr. Monique Bertrand, alongside Lynn Posluns, Kelly Scrivens, and Sian Canavan, CFA.

Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds would not be possible without our generous presenting sponsor, RBC Wealth Management, along with support from Aon, CIHR, RBC Place London, SIR Corp., Shiseido, and The Globe and Mail.

What healthy habits will you try in June?Ingraining healthy new habits takes longer than we’d like to think. Tracking th...
05/31/2024

What healthy habits will you try in June?

Ingraining healthy new habits takes longer than we’d like to think. Tracking these habits makes remembering and following them easier in the long term.

BrainFit - Habit Tracker is the only app that tracks all 6 pillars of brain health to reduce your risk of dementia. It’s evidence-backed by peer-reviewed journals.

Add habits, set reminders, and track your progress. It’s free, customizable, and 100% confidential—no sign-up required.

📲VISIT LINK IN BIO TO DOWNLOAD NOW OR CHECK OUT

Researchers from the University Research Priority Program Dynamics of Healthy Aging and the Healthy Longevity Center of ...
05/30/2024

Researchers from the University Research Priority Program Dynamics of Healthy Aging and the Healthy Longevity Center of the University of Zurich wanted to discover how various leisure activities—physical and social—affect brain health in old age.

The research aimed to investigate the relationships between the thickness of the entorhinal cortex, memory performance, and leisure activities in cognitively healthy adults over the age of 65 for a period of seven years.

The thickness of the entorhinal cortex is closely linked to memory performance. The less the thickness of this brain structure decreased over the course of the study, the less memory performance was reduced. increased physical and social activity slowed the thinning of the entorhinal cortex and, consequently, memory decline over seven years. High initial memory performance is also correlated with slower cognitive decline, supporting the concept of ‘cognitive reserve.’

Your speed of speech, rather than the struggle to find words, may be a more telling indicator of cognitive health.Previo...
05/28/2024

Your speed of speech, rather than the struggle to find words, may be a more telling indicator of cognitive health.

Previous research focused on word-finding difficulties as a potential red flag for cognitive decline. However, this study aimed to explore whether other aspects of speech might offer more precise insights into our cognitive well-being as we age.

As anticipated, certain mental faculties and aspects of speech diminish with age. However, a key finding of the study highlighted the distinction between difficulties in word retrieval and the pace of speech as markers of cognitive wellness. Researchers observed a strong connection between slower speech rates and diminished executive function.

Interestingly, the study found no correlation between cognitive decline and the frequency or length of pauses participants took when searching for the right words. This suggests that the occasional difficulty in finding words, a common concern among older adults, may not necessarily signal severe cognitive problems. Instead, a broader slowdown in speech rate—excluding these pauses—stood out as a potentially more critical indicator of brain health changes.

This research suggests that such pausing is a normal part of aging and is not directly linked to a decline in other mental abilities.

The study, from researchers at Baycrest and the University of Toronto, was published in the journal Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.

Scammers typically call victims late at night, posing as a grandchild or relative in urgent need of financial assistance...
05/25/2024

Scammers typically call victims late at night, posing as a grandchild or relative in urgent need of financial assistance. They often sound very distressed to mask their voice, claiming they’ve been in an accident or arrested and require bail money.

Usually, scammers gather identifying details about the family from social media to make their stories more convincing. They may contact victims via phone, email, or text message, repeatedly insisting that their plea is genuine and not a scam. After establishing the story, they often pass the phone to someone impersonating a lawyer, police officer, or similar authority to arrange the details for collecting the money or having it sent by transfer.

Awareness of the scam is the first step to avoiding it. Talk to family members at risk and explain how the scam operates. Advise them to avoid answering calls from unfamiliar numbers and remind them that caller IDs can be manipulated.

If they do answer, they should never provide personal or banking information or send money via wire transfer or e-transfer. Emphasize that no government agency or legitimate business will ever request payment via gift card. The best action is to hang up and call a trusted family member to discuss the call.

Another security tip is to have a family code word. For example, “I hear that you’re in trouble. Can you please tell me the code word?”According to Laura Tamblyn Watts’ book “Let’s Talk About Aging Parents,’ “As long as this isn’t something obvious like your pet’s name, the scammer won’t be able to guess it. If the imposter ‘can’t remember’ the code, your parent should hang up and phone the relative directly. (But watch out - if your parent says they’ll call back, the scam artist will probably say that ‘their’ phone was damaged or lost.)”

If a senior family member is suddenly acting cagey about their financial records or requesting to visit the bank right away, it may be a sign they’ve been scammed. Other signs are more obvious, like large amounts of cash missing. If you discover a family member has been defrauded, report it to the financial institution, the police and the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

Source: Elder Abuse Prevention Ontario

Protecting ourselves against dementia, heart disease, and cancer.If you’re in the London area, and thanks to RBC Wealth ...
05/23/2024

Protecting ourselves against dementia, heart disease, and cancer.

If you’re in the London area, and thanks to RBC Wealth Management, we hope you can attend this enlightening event!

Hear powerful messages from experts on the best ways to guard against disease, unique differences for women, and the control we have to maintain our health - throughout our bodies and our lives. Featuring Drs. Vivien Brown, Liisa Galea, Patrice Lindsay, and Monique Bertrand.

Evening also made possible with support from Aon, CIHR Institute of Aging, Conair, Indigo, JW Marriott The Rosseau Muskoka, RBC Place London, SIR Corp, Shiseido, Stringing Him Along, and The Globe and Mail.

Heading into the weekend inspired! Here’s to living a vibrant, adventurous life regardless of age, prioritizing personal...
05/18/2024

Heading into the weekend inspired! Here’s to living a vibrant, adventurous life regardless of age, prioritizing personal fulfillment and memorable experiences over conforming to traditional norms of aging.
What’s your story?

Case Kenny is the Chicago-based writer, podcaster and recording artist behind The New Mindset Journal, a self-discovery journal with prompted and unprompted journaling tips.

People often hold tension in their tongue without being aware of it, and when we’re stressed, many of us manifest this t...
05/16/2024

People often hold tension in their tongue without being aware of it, and when we’re stressed, many of us manifest this tension by pressing our tongue against the roof of our mouth. Relaxing your tongue helps release stress, and also can help you fall asleep faster.

1. Close your eyes and briefly press your tongue against the roof of your mouth to make it tense, then stop doing that and allow your tongue to relax.
2. Let your tongue go, especially the back of your tongue.
3. As you exhale, feel it let go even more.
4. Exaggerate the relaxation.
5. If you need to swallow, that’s okay.
6. If your tongue gets tense again, don’t get annoyed. Just allow it to relax.
7. Exaggerate the relaxation again.
8. Feel your tongue floating in the cavity of your mouth.
9. You may feel it shorten or thicken slightly.
10. Exaggerate the relaxation even more and focus on only relaxing your tongue – nothing else.

Farro is an ancient grain that resembles brown rice and is packed with fibre, protein, vitamins, minerals and antioxidan...
05/14/2024

Farro is an ancient grain that resembles brown rice and is packed with fibre, protein, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. By preventing cell damage, antioxidants play a role in preventing neurodegenerative diseases like dementia.

Farro is an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral our bodies need for muscle function. Our cells use magnesium to develop strong bones and healthy muscles. Magnesium is also needed for nerve function and a regular heartbeat.

Farro is wonderful in soups, stews, and salads because of its chewy texture and nutty flavour. Popular in Italy, this healthy dish is gaining favour in the U.S. for its versatility and health benefits.

It’s a great alternative to refined grains and can easily be added to your diet. Farro is low in fat and calories while providing a variety of healthy nutrients. One serving of this superfood provides about 200 calories, 7 grams of protein, and 7 grams of fibre.

Enjoy this delicious Farro Arugula Salad from and get the brain-boosting benefits of farro!

Inadequate levels of vitamin B-12 can lead to fatigue, weakness, memory issues, and nervous system complications. Also k...
05/11/2024

Inadequate levels of vitamin B-12 can lead to fatigue, weakness, memory issues, and nervous system complications. Also known as cobalamin, vitamin B-12 is a water-soluble nutrient crucial for blood formation and nerve function.

A challenge with this vitamin is that our bodies cannot produce it autonomously, necessitating reliance on dietary sources and supplements. Vitamin B12 is present in foods of animal origin, including fish, meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products. The deficiency of vitamin B-12 is prevalent among vegetarians and vegans, given its absence in plant-based foods. Research indicates that a significant portion—up to 80-90%—of vegans and vegetarians may lack vitamin B-12.

This deficiency affects the body in various ways, often manifesting symptoms similar to dementia, leading to misdiagnosis or delayed treatment. Confusion, forgetfulness, depression, and poor concentration are four common symptoms shared between B-12 deficiency and dementia.

Because the body stores about 1 to 5 mg vitamin B12 (or about 1,000 to 2,000 times as much as the amount typically consumed in a day), the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency can take several years to appear.

A recent study in Cureus suggests a connection between vitamin B-12 deficiency and cognitive decline, indicating that replacement therapy could enhance cognitive function in affected individuals.

B-12 deficiency may also contribute to confusion and behavioural alterations, but it’s reversible with proper treatment. Elevating B-12 levels could potentially enhance memory, clarity of thought, and alleviate associated symptoms like fatigue.

Recommended Intakes:
Age Male Female
4–8 years 1.2 mcg 1.2 mcg
9–13 years 1.8 mcg 1.8 mcg
14–18 years 2.4 mcg 2.4 mcg
19+ years 2.4 mcg 2.4 mcg

According to recent research, the novel hypothesis is that microbial community diversity, composition, and function may ...
05/09/2024

According to recent research, the novel hypothesis is that microbial community diversity, composition, and function may reflect current and predict future cognitive function and depressive symptoms in late life.

Study authors noted, “Results suggest cognitive dysfunction and depression are unique states with an overall biological effect detectable through gut microbiota. The microbiome may present a noninvasive readout and prognostic tool for cognitive and psychiatric states”.

Both cognitive function and depressive symptoms serve as significant predictors of microbiome composition. Higher microbial community diversity was associated with lower cognitive function in the whole sample and greater depression severity in those participants who were not currently on antidepressants. Greater diversity was also associated with lower lifetime alcohol consumption.

This is the first longitudinal, transdiagnostic study that investigated the current and future impacts of the gut microbiome on cognitive decline and depressive symptoms in a large sample of older adults. The study was published in Molecular Psychiatry.

Participating in and crafting music in any form has been correlated with enhanced brain health during the later stages o...
05/08/2024

Participating in and crafting music in any form has been correlated with enhanced brain health during the later stages of life, according to a recent study published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Specifically, playing the piano showed a significant connection with heightened memory and enhanced executive function, facilitating the capacity to tackle intricate tasks in older individuals.

According to study author Anne Corbett, a professor of dementia research at the U.K.’s University of Exeter, “Our study has confirmed that people who engage with music, particularly by learning to play an instrument, have better brain function in later life. Playing instruments is linked with better memory and ability to perform complex tasks, especially playing keyboard instruments. People who continued to play instruments into later life showed the best outcomes, indicating the importance of engaging with music throughout life.”

The study findings unveiled that individuals with extensive musical backgrounds and ongoing exposure to music throughout their lives exhibited superior cognitive capabilities in their later years. Moreover, engaging in musical activities during the later stages of life amplified these advantages.

Playing keyboard instruments exhibited the most pronounced impact on both memory and executive function. Additionally, playing brass and woodwind instruments correlated with improved memory, whereas singing was associated with enhanced performance in complex tasks.

“Playing and reading music are complex tasks which challenge the brain,” Corbett said. “It is likely that by engaging with music in this way people are increasing their brain’s resilience by forming more complex connections, in a similar way to learning a second language or performing brain-training tasks. Engaging with music will activate key pathways in the brain that promote memory, problem-solving and complex thinking, and this then improves their overall brain function.”

Women of all ages are more sensitive to the effects of dehydration, but elderly women are especially vulnerable. A study...
05/05/2024

Women of all ages are more sensitive to the effects of dehydration, but elderly women are especially vulnerable. A study examining the hydration status of 2,506 adults over age 60 found that women with inadequate hydration levels performed worse on cognitive tasks related to attention and processing speed. The performance of dehydrated men also declined but to a lesser degree.

In young women, cognitive deficits can be readily reversed by replenishing fluids, while in the elderly, the prolonged cellular stress of dehydration may promote brain pathology and continued cognitive decline.

To keep your brain adequately hydrated, it is recommended that women consume 2 to 2.7 litres (8 to 11 cups) and men consume 2.5 to 3.7 litres (10 to 15 cups) of fluids per day. However, individual needs may vary depending on activity level and medication use.

Maintaining hydration also involves incorporating diet and exercise. Hydration guidelines encompass the intake of all fluids, not just the quantity of plain water consumed daily. However, increasing the consumption of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages is counterproductive, as they come with their own health risks.

Reducing calorie intake by 12%t can enhance life expectancy by revitalizing energy levels and rejuvenating muscles. A re...
05/02/2024

Reducing calorie intake by 12%t can enhance life expectancy by revitalizing energy levels and rejuvenating muscles. A recent extensive study reveals that adopting a calorie-restriction diet—cutting calories while ensuring adequate vitamin and mineral intake—can mitigate inflammation and boost metabolism over the long term.

A reduced caloric intake was found to up-regulate genes responsible for energy generation and metabolism while concurrently down-regulating inflammatory genes, resulting in diminished inflammation.

“Since inflammation and aging are strongly coupled, calorie restriction represents a powerful approach to preventing the pro-inflammatory state that is developed by many older people,” said author and NIA Scientific Director Luigi Ferrucci, M.D., Ph.D.

This startling statistic is according to the “World Alzheimer Report 2021” from Alzheimer’s Disease International. But w...
04/30/2024

This startling statistic is according to the “World Alzheimer Report 2021” from Alzheimer’s Disease International. But what does it mean?
That estimate is based on research that compares health records of individuals who were diagnosed with AD while living and the results of post-mortem brain autopsies.

A check-in with your doctor presents the opportunity to pick up and address other potentially reversible conditions that can cause dementia-like symptoms.

> Medication side-effects or interactions. A wide range of medications can impair thinking and memory, including older-generation antihistamines, sleep aids, opioid painkillers, tricyclic antidepressants, corticosteroids, and drugs used to treat urinary incontinence. > Mood disorders. Both anxiety and depression can cause cognitive symptoms, such as problems with attention and working memory, and difficulty making decisions.> Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This type of interrupted breathing during sleep can cause deficits in executive functions, attention, and memory. The good news? In a study involving 167 people with OSA, published in Sleep in January 2022, “cognitive function across all cognitive domains improved after six months of CPAP,” (using a continuous positive airway pressure machine during sleep). > Thyroid dysfunction. A shortage or overabundance of thyroid hormone caused by an under- or over-active thyroid gland can cause problems with memory and concentration.

A recent longitudinal study conducted over 20 years with 826 adults (mean age 76.3; 57% women) published in JAMA showed ...
04/27/2024

A recent longitudinal study conducted over 20 years with 826 adults (mean age 76.3; 57% women) published in JAMA showed that status as a short sleeper (less than 7 hours) and higher sleep variability were significantly associated with the incidence of cognitive impairment.

Sleep disruption has long been associated with dementia, with studies indicating that up to 90% of patients experience disrupted sleep before the emergence of cardinal disease symptoms.

Although this association was initially believed to reflect the progressive degeneration of sleep-regulatory centers within the brain, more recent studies suggest that sleep disruption may influence the pathological processes underlying these dementing disorders.

Sleep is one of the Six Pillars of Brain Health. Looking to improve your sleep? Checkout BrainFit-Habit Tracker in the App Store. The latest version syncs to Apple Health!

Marcia is wearing a 14kt yellow gold 18” necklace featuring a centre Hope-Knot pendant, custom-made and designed by MARK...
04/26/2024

Marcia is wearing a 14kt yellow gold 18” necklace featuring a centre Hope-Knot pendant, custom-made and designed by MARK LASH to support Women’s Brain Health Initiative.
 
Almost 70% of Alzheimer’s sufferers are women. We can’t ignore a number this big.
Women’s Brain Health Initiative is a global charitable organization raising funds for s*x and gender brain-aging research and education that better meets women’s unique needs. The Hope-Knot, the symbol of the charity, is an icon to create awareness and escalate concern over the unchecked growth of dementia and other brain-aging diseases that disproportionately affect women.

An ideal gift for Mother’s Day for the women you love and whose brain you want to protect.

Support the Initiative. Wear a Hope-Knot.
For more information and additional designs in the collection, please visit hopeknot.org

Our 18th edition of Mind Over Matter is now available, thanks to our partner Brain Canada. This edition features TV Pers...
04/25/2024

Our 18th edition of Mind Over Matter is now available, thanks to our partner Brain Canada. This edition features TV Personality Cheryl Hickey with her mother, Lori Hickey, on the front cover.

They hope to spread the word about brain health and how best to safeguard it. Read their story and discover the latest research findings on how to protect your brain health.

To get your free copy, while quantities last, go to https://womensbrains.me/Order

With immense pleasure, we welcome Catherine Hunter to our esteemed board of directors. Catherine is a partner at EY Cana...
04/23/2024

With immense pleasure, we welcome Catherine Hunter to our esteemed board of directors. Catherine is a partner at EY Canada and is the National Leader of their Technology Strategy and Transformation practice, serving clients in Consumer Health and Life Sciences. Catherine has worked with diverse private and public sector clients throughout her career to develop and deliver health-focused strategies and transformations. She has served extensively as a business and technology advisor in clinical, academic and business settings.

With a longstanding history in Canada’s digital health community and through work with diverse clients and technology vendors, Catherine has always enjoyed the opportunity to develop and enable strategies through technology while working closely with the people and teams whose working lives and customer experiences can be improved.

Before joining EY in 2020, Catherine led the Health consulting practice at PwC Canada. She has also held roles with Canada Health Infoway, focusing on delivering connected electronic health solutions across Canada. She has a keen interest in volunteering and governance. She is currently the Chair of the Board for Technation Health (an association comprised of technology vendors serving Canada’s health sector) and is a member of Digital Health Canada. 

We are confident that Catherine’s unique perspective and invaluable contributions will be pivotal in steering WBHI toward greater success in our endeavours. Please join us in extending a warm welcome to Catherine.

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M4V3A1

Telephone

+18889272011

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