Solace Through Death

Solace Through Death Comfort For The Dying
(1)

❤️
06/15/2024

❤️

Death doulas across the US attend to the non-medical needs of anyone who is dying, focusing on providing support and education to patients who are near death, as well as their family members.

A year ago I was interviewed by The New York Times regarding non-profit and for-profit hospices, and the stark differenc...
06/11/2024

A year ago I was interviewed by The New York Times regarding non-profit and for-profit hospices, and the stark differences between the two. Maybe one day I might decide to write on my experiences as a death care Nurse, and how we need to better serve the dying 🩷

A friend sent me this link this morning. It is one of the most profound things I have ever watched. At the end of your l...
06/09/2024

A friend sent me this link this morning. It is one of the most profound things I have ever watched. At the end of your life, will you be the one saying “what if I would have shown up”. My life’s work is with the dying, but this message today was to not fear showing up and presenting what I have to offer the world in death care. I have never needed a message more than this one in this moment. 🩷

Dr. Brené Brown is a researcher professor at the University of Houston, Graduate College of Social Work, where she has spent the past ten years studying a co...

❤️
06/08/2024

❤️

06/08/2024

This is absolutely beautiful 🦋

06/07/2024

❤️

Some really insightful information about using our own personal stories when supporting a grieving person, and how this ...
06/03/2024

Some really insightful information about using our own personal stories when supporting a grieving person, and how this can be detrimental in rhe long run. 🩷

There are good intentions behind the people who offer “support” by way of speaking about their own personal losses however, each loss is unique to us individually and those types of comments can actually inadvertently do more harm than good.

Being human, we are constantly seeking ways to connect with one another.

If someone talks about their first experience flying on an airplane, it makes sense that we would also think of our first time on an airplane.

Conversations make us reflective. They put us down the road marked “memory lane” and we motor along looking for something in those memories to connect us with the people we are trying to find common ground with.

But grief is a whole new ball game. A chaotic ball game much like that of the “who’s on first?” skit by Abbott and Costello.

Do you know it ? It’s a mess. No concrete answers, lots of frustrations and miscommunications and yes…some humor sprinkled about just to make the whole process bearable.

So grief is like that.

A mess. But our own mess.

No one else can tidy it up because it’s not theirs.

To say to someone “I know exactly how you feel” and continue on about your own losses, is diminishing and a disservice to the person thrown into the freshness of grief. It can cause them to feel even more alone in their grief even if the desired outcome was to make them feel less alone.

Always ask carefully and respectfully if it’s OK if you share your experiences.

You do not need to know “exactly” how someone feels to be able to support them and be empathetic.

Sometimes just listening is the best support there is.

Credit to for the great depiction.

❤️
06/02/2024

❤️

we are carried.
in bellies. in arms.
in love. in hope.
in caskets. in urns.
in grief. in memories.
our whole lives.
and into the next.
we are carried.
- Sarah Rian

For me, it taught me about the depths of my love and the art of forgiveness ❤️
05/29/2024

For me, it taught me about the depths of my love and the art of forgiveness ❤️

05/14/2024

When they walk out that door to leave, tell them you love them. You never know when they won’t walk back through that door, and you will no longer be able tot tell them in person. ❤️

🩷
05/11/2024

🩷

One day, I was talking to my granddaughter, and I mentioned something that my mom had done years ago. The first thing she said to me was “you have a mom?” I realized that I never talked about her or my father or my two siblings, which my granddaughter’s had never met. The only one that can keep their story alive is me. 

Don’t stop saying their name or telling their story. Be the one that keeps their story and their legacy alive.

xo
Gabby
www.thehospiceheart.net

🩷
05/09/2024

🩷

Three years after being diagnosed with metastatic sarcoma, Kimberley Nix died on Wednesday, May 8.

🩷
05/06/2024

🩷

After Ruthie Fonseca's dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, she decided to stage a wedding photo shoot with him.

❤️
05/05/2024

❤️

"Permission to Mourn" by Tom Zuba is a heartfelt guide to navigating the grieving process and finding healing after the loss of a loved one. Drawing on his own experiences of loss and grief, Zuba offers compassionate support and practical advice for individuals on their journey through grief.

Here are ten key lessons and insights from the book:

1. Grief Is a Normal Response to Loss: Zuba emphasizes that grief is a natural and normal response to the loss of a loved one. He reassures readers that their feelings of sadness, anger, and confusion are valid and to be expected in the grieving process.

2. Honoring the Unique Nature of Grief: The book recognizes that grief is a deeply personal experience, and each individual's journey through grief is unique. Zuba encourages readers to honor their own feelings and experiences, without comparing themselves to others or feeling pressured to grieve in a certain way.

3. Permission to Feel: Zuba gives readers permission to feel their emotions fully, without judgment or inhibition. He encourages them to embrace their feelings of sadness, anger, guilt, and even moments of joy, as an essential part of the healing process.

4. The Myth of "Getting Over" Grief: Zuba challenges the notion that grief is something to be "gotten over" or resolved quickly. He emphasizes that grief is a lifelong journey, and while the intensity of emotions may lessen over time, the love for the lost loved one remains.

5. Creating Meaningful Rituals: The book explores the importance of creating meaningful rituals and traditions to honor and remember the deceased. Zuba suggests simple rituals such as lighting a candle, planting a tree, or writing in a journal as ways to keep the memory of the loved one alive.

6. Finding Support in Community: Zuba highlights the importance of finding support in community during the grieving process. Whether through support groups, therapy, or connecting with friends and family, having a supportive network can provide comfort and validation during difficult times.

7. Self-Compassion and Self-Care: The book encourages readers to practice self-compassion and self-care as they navigate grief. Zuba emphasizes the importance of taking care of oneself physically, emotionally, and spiritually, and not to neglect one's own needs in the midst of grief.

8. Embracing Change and Growth: Zuba suggests that grief can be a catalyst for personal growth and transformation. He encourages readers to embrace the changes that come with grief, and to find meaning and purpose in their loss through acts of kindness, creativity, and service.

9. Honoring the Legacy of the Deceased: The book encourages readers to honor the legacy of the deceased by living their lives in a way that reflects their values and beliefs. Zuba suggests finding ways to carry forward the lessons and wisdom imparted by the loved one, and to find comfort in keeping their memory alive through acts of love and kindness.

10. Finding Hope and Healing: Ultimately, "Permission to Mourn" is a message of hope and healing for those navigating grief. Zuba reminds readers that while grief may be painful and difficult, it is also a journey of love, connection, and transformation, leading to a deeper appreciation for life and a renewed sense of purpose.

"Permission to Mourn" is a compassionate and empowering guide to navigating the complexities of grief. Through heartfelt insights, practical advice, and personal anecdotes, Tom Zuba offers solace and support to those grieving the loss of a loved one, reminding them that they have permission to mourn in their own way and to find healing and hope in the midst of sorrow.

Book: https://amzn.to/3UBD9xf

I am in full support of use of mushrooms for end-of-life purposes, and have said I would always choose the use of this o...
05/05/2024

I am in full support of use of mushrooms for end-of-life purposes, and have said I would always choose the use of this over the morphine/ativan combo any day. ❤️

In a case that could shape the future of psychedelic medicine, a palliative care physician is challenging a DEA decision that bars him from prescribing psilocybin to late-stage cancer patients.

❤️
05/04/2024

❤️

When the mother was in the final hours of her life, I asked both daughters if they desired to be present at their mother’s death. Exhausted, both physically and emotionally, they said their final good-byes and silently left their mother’s side. After I read stories from Graceful Passages (Stillwater and Malkin) and shared my poems from my heart, kissed this matriarch good-bye, I too headed home to rest as I sensed death was very near. As I prepared for bed, the phone rang. She had died. Directly, I drove back to my client’s care home to begin the rituals of honoring her transition. Both daughters appeared, with the eldest standing at the door. We embraced and slipped into silence, tears, and reverence. After a period of meditation, I asked permission to begin the end-of-life rites. The youngest daughter did not show any signs of fearing death. Her fearlessness became even more evident by her participation in the after-death rituals of bathing, anointing, adorning, and dressing her mother for final dispensation (burial). I inquired if the eldest daughter wished to be present or wait for us in the living room. I placed a chair for her halfway into the room and halfway out in the hall. She chose to sit in a chair at the edge of the room. She had chosen to sit at the threshold of her emotions.

For the next two and one-half hours, the youngest daughter and I bathed her mother, oiled her body, combed her hair, dressed her, sang Yiddish songs, shared memories, and adorned her with jewels and flowers. The eldest daughter, still sitting at the edge of the room, held tightly to her mother’s socks as we cared for her mother’s body. I waited until all the rituals were completed and then I tenderly reached my hand out for the socks. She held the socks ever so tightly near to her heart and she whispered, “I would like to place the socks on my mother.” My breath escaped, as I understood what an unfathomable transition this was for her. Tears flowed down all our cheeks.

Shared from the End of Life Principles training manual written by Dr. Deerheart







🩷
05/04/2024

🩷

Grief makes you
feel like the
world isn’t
your home

Grief can be an overwhelming
and isolating experience
that makes it seem as though
the world around you has
shifted in a way that makes
you feel disconnected

You feel as if you are carrying
the weight of the world
on your shoulders, and that
no one truly understands
the depths of your emotions.

The world we once knew
no longer belongs to us

You are not alone in your feelings
We will navigate through it together

In despair there are always
beams of light that can pierce
through the darkness

With time you can gradually
find your way back to feeling
at home in the world once again

Reach out and allow yourself
to experience and process
your emotions

You are stronger than you
realize and deserve kindness
and compassion as you
navigate through this
difficult period

Brighter days will come

We are home …
when we are together

Until we meet again …

~ Words by Hello To Heaven (Facebook)

~ Art by Helena Nelson Reed

❤️
05/02/2024

❤️

🦋

By🖊️Lana Rafaela

Over 300 blankets were made yesterday. Here is a video from Channel 4, featuring the table I was working at. So proud th...
05/01/2024

Over 300 blankets were made yesterday. Here is a video from Channel 4, featuring the table I was working at. So proud that 700 people showed up yesterday to help with Gift of Life Michigan. ❤️

The organ and tissue donation organization makes comfort blankets that are provided to newly grieving donor families.

Address

Hamburg, MI
48139

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Solace Through Death posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Solace Through Death:

Share


Other Hamburg health & beauty businesses

Show All